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HomeContents > People > Photographers > T. O'Conor Sloane Jr.

Dates:  1870 - 1963
Born:  US, NY, Brooklyn
 
  

Preparing biographies

Approved biography for T. O'Conor Sloane Jr.
(Courtesy of Christian Peterson)

 
  
T. O’Conor Sloane, Jr., was born in 1870 in Brooklyn, but spent most of his adult life in Orange, New Jersey. He was the son of an accomplished scientist and trained as an electrical engineer. He was photographing by the summer of 1894, at age fifteen, when he documented a weeklong cruise with his father on a sloop yacht on Long Island Sound. Pictures of this trip survive in a unique album he compiled that is now at the Mystic Seaport Museum (Mystic, Connecticut).
 
Sloane was most active as a naturalistic photographer at the turn of the twentieth century. Reproductions of his work appeared in the American Annual of Photography 1901 and the monthlies Photo Beacon (June 1900) and Photographic Times (November 1900 and January 1904). Camera Notes, the quarterly of the Camera Club of New York, also ran a halftone of one of his landscapes in its October 1900 issue.
 
Sloane exhibited his pictures in both this country and Europe. In 1900, he showed in photographic salons in Chicago and Philadelphia. His photographs were accepted by juries in London in 1901 and Turin in 1902. He also exhibited in members’ shows at the Camera Club of New York in 1900 and 1901 and the Orange Camera Club. In 1902, Alfred Stieglitz included a single piece by Sloane in American Pictorial Photography, the inaugural exhibition of the Photo-Secession, a high honor. Presumably, this signaled that Sloane was a member of this advanced group of photographers, but his work never again appeared in this context.
 
Sloane preferred landscape and nude subjects. He sometimes printed in gum-bichromate, a process that allowed heavy hand manipulation of the photographic image. He even penned a brief technical note about gum printing, for the January 1901 issue of Camera Notes.
 
After this date, T. O’Conor Sloane, Jr., all but disappeared in the photographic press, except for a portrait of him in the May 1932 issue of Photo Miniature, with no accompanying text. He died in 1963. 
  
Christian A. Peterson Pictorial Photography at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts (Christian A. Peterson: Privately printed, 2012) 
  
This biography is courtesy and copyright of Christian Peterson and is included here with permission. 
  
Date last updated: 1 June 2013. 
  
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Portraits 
  
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