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HomeContents > People > Photographers > Horst Faas

Dates:  1933, 28 April - 2012, 10 May
Born:  Germany, Berlin
Died:  Germany, Munich
 
  
War photographer and photojournalist. His outstanding work during the Vietnam War won the 1965 Pulitzer Prize. He was also an excellent picture editor, selecting two of the most memorable photographs of the Vietnam War: Eddie Adams‘s 1 Feb 1968 photograph of an execution on a Saigon street and Nick Ut‘s 1972 photograph of Kim Phuc, the young girl running down a rural road after being burnt by napalm.

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Philip Katcher
Horst Faas at work at Cam Rahn, Viet Nam, when the 1st Infantry Division landed there. 
1965, August
 
  
Family history 
  
If you are related to this photographer and interested in tracking down your extended family we can place a note here for you to help. It is free and you would be amazed who gets in touch. 
  
alan@luminous-lint.com
 
  
 
  

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Internet biographies

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Getty Research, Los Angeles, USA has an ULAN (Union List of Artists Names Online) entry for this photographer. This is useful for checking names and they frequently provide a brief biography. Go to website
 

Quotations

The wit and wisdom.

 
"I try to express with the camera what the story is, to get to the heart of the story with picture. In battle I look at things first in terms of people, second in terms of strategies or casualties…. To tell a story, you don‘t photograph one hundred dead civilians to prove there where one hundred dead civilians. You photograph one dead civilian with an expression on his face that says, ‘This is what it‘s like if you‘re a dead civilian in Vietnam.‘"
"To get the best picture of a captured prisoner, you have to get him just as he is captured. The expression he wears then lost forever…. The human mechanism is remarkably recuperative. A half hour later, the expressions are gone, the faces have changed. The mother with the dead baby in her arms does not look grief struck anymore, no matter what she feels."
 
  
 
  
 
  
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