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Feb 10, 2012 Lewis Hine and Child Labor Reform 
 
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As the number of children employed in industrial occupations was increasing in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries so there was a reaction against it based on health, educational, social and religious rationales. Edgar Gardner Murphy (1869-1913), who had served as priest of the Episcopal Church for twelve years, saw the dangers of unfettered child labor and proposed a National Child Labor Committee bringing together different groups with similar motivations.
 
On 25th April 1904 a meeting was held at Carnegie Hall in New York City to address the plight of working children. It was at that meeting that the National Child Labor Committee (NCLC) was established. By 1907 the organisation had gained considerable support and it was charted by an Act of Congress.
 
To raise public awareness in early 1908 they hired Lewis Hine to photograph working children and it was appreciated that his images and supporting notes would serve as documentary evidence of the appalling working conditions of young workers. By 1912 a Children‘ Bureau was established in both the U.S. Department of Commerce and the U.S. Department of Labor which indicated progress but laws were introduced at the state or city level resulting in a patchwork of differing standards and enforcement. It was not until Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 that child labor was effectively banned or regulated nationwide.
 
In 1954, to commemorate its fiftieth anniversary, the National Child Labor Committee presented to the Library of Congress official records, correspondence, speeches, reports, press releases, and clippings from the period 1904 to 1953. This resource is regarded as one of the most significant documentary projects in the history of photography.
 
With thanks to Frédéric Perrier for his enthusiasm for the crusading work of Lewis Hine. 
  
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Exhibition: Lewis Hine and Child Labor Reform 
  
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Feb 6, 2012 Advertising and Commercial Photography: An Introduction 
 
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One would need to be brave or insane to attempt an overview of "Advertising and Commercial Photography" and hopefully I can claim neither of those personality traits - though the second might be debatable. This new online exhibition is a historical introduction to the subject and it ends at about the 1930s. It makes no attempt at being comprehensive but rather brings together little seen examples from a wide range of sources. Over time I'll be focusing in on specific aspects of the subject.
 
I'm interested in hearing from collectors and organisations who have 19th century commercial catalogues and marketing materials with tipped-in photographs - alan@luminous-lint.com
 
These online exhibitions could not happen without the support of a great many people and organisations who deserve our thanks and support. Thanks to you all. 
  
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Exhibition: Advertising and Commercial Photography: An Introduction 
  
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Feb 5, 2012 Different versions of Photographs 
 
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We are interested in building up reference sets to show how the same plate or negative could be used to create different photographs. If you have, or know about, examples please send me an email - alan@luminous-lint.com 
  
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Exhibition: Different versions of Photographs 
  
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Feb 5, 2012 William de Wiveleslie Abney: Thebes and its Five Greater Temples 
 
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The photographs in this online exhibition are taken from William de Wiveleslie Abney Thebes and its Five Greater Temples, (London: Sampson, Low, Marston, Searle, & Rivington, 1876) in the collection of the University of Heidelberg Library.
 
William de Wiveleslie Abney was in Egypt in 1874 to photograph the Transit of Venus and whilst awaiting that event took photographs of the archaeological monuments of Thebes. As he was on an official scientific expedition he was well equipped and accompanied by three members of the Royal Engineers of the British Army - and their names are given in the Preface to his 1876 book as Corporals Laffeaty, Milne, and Farr. There is a discrepancy in the names as in "Paper IX. The Recent Transit of Venus" by Captain Abney, R.E. p.73 in Papers on Subjects connected with the Duties of the Corps of Royal Engineers, New Series XXIII, 1876 they are given as Sapper Laffeaty, 2nd Corpl. Mitre and Sapper W. Farr.
 
The quality of these tipped-in albumen plates is exceptional and reflects well on the training of the team. 
  
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Exhibition: William de Wiveleslie Abney: Thebes and its Five Greater Temples 
  
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Feb 5, 2012 Enrico Van Lint: Ricordo di Pisa 
 
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This online exhibition shows the type of souvenir album that could be purchased when visiting tourist sites in the nineteenth century. The album was created by the notable photographer of Pisa Enrico Van Lint (1808-1884) and there is a biography kindly provided by Giovanni Fanelli. Many thanks to Christoph Laubsch for providing this example from his collection. 
  
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Exhibition: Enrico Van Lint: Ricordo di Pisa 
  
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Feb 5, 2012 Woodward's Solar Enlarger - A personal story 
 
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Collecting photography is a long term passion and this online exhibition traces the story as Matt Isenburg, one of the leading American collectors of nineteenth century photography and a caring friend, tells how he took forty years to acquire a Woodward's Solar Enlarger from his friend Frank. Read the introduction to understand the passion for collecting.
 
 
  
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Exhibition: Woodward's Solar Enlarger - A personal story 
  
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Feb 1, 2012 The Afghan Box Camera Project 2012 
 
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Curated by
The Afghan Box Camera Project
Afghan Box Camera Project
Lukas Birk & Sean Foley

 
Editorial note
 
Firstly a disclaimer - I do not know and have not met the people who run this project.
 
Secondly - I haven't used Luminous-Lint to back projects financially because I feel it is not appropriate but here I'm making an exception.
 
The Afghan Box Camera Project is timely and significant as it is documenting a way of taking photographs that is vanishing around the world and deserves to be recorded. The Afghan Box Camera Project has clearly demonstrated that they are serious, have thought it through, and have done an excellent job and will continue to do so - it deserves our support.
 
Help out if you can - thanks, Alan Griffiths
 

 

KickStarter - Afghan Box Camera Project 2012
 
  
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Exhibition: Afghan Box Camera Project 
  
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Jan 31, 2012 26.5 million is not a small number... 
 
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My memory can be terrible and I forget bits of software I've written. Yesterday I found a bit I wrote in late 2007 that has been logging page views on www.luminous-lint.com since then. I just checked and there have been 26.5 million page views since January 2008. Currently it is running at well over 500,000 a month so I think some of you may be interested in photography.
 
[Posted to Facebook: 31 January 2012] 
  
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Jan 22, 2012 
  
** Ongoing ** 
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Paintings and prints based on photographs or vice versa 
 
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It can be difficult to locate examples of paintings that have provably been based on photographs, or vice versa, and so this exhibition brings together some notable examples and it will be improved over time. If you have examples let us all know. 
  
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Exhibition: Paintings and prints based on photographs or vice versa 
  
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Jan 22, 2012 
  
** Ongoing ** 
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Photographs that are stylistically similar to paintings 
 
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At certain times people have sought to raise the "artistic" value of photography by showing how similar it was, or is, to painting. Within pictorialism "hand-worked" prints were the natural way to go with this and although it was a dead end as it denied what made photography unique it was a significant period in widening the acceptance of photography as an art form. This exhibition brings together a series of photographs that demonstrate how photographers have been influenced stylistically by painting and printmaking. 
  
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Exhibition: Photographs that are stylistically similar to paintings 
  
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