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Unidentified photographer/creator 
The apparatus for the Daguerreotype 
1853 
  
Book illustration 
Google Books 
 
LL/34653 
  
Published in "Part III - Practice of Photography" in "A Manual of Photography" (Third edition) by Robert Hunt (London: John Joseph Griffin & Co., 1853), a part of the "Encyclopeadia Metropolitana: or, System of Universal Knowledge". P.257, fig.66.
 
The apparatus for the Daguerreotype shown in the vignette, may be enumerated with advantage.
 
a. Is the camera obscura, with the screen upon which the image is seen, and by which the focus is adjusted, partly raised; and when this is accurately determined a screw is shown by which it is secured.
 
b. Silver plate and edges for the same.
 
c c. Are bromide and iodine boxes of walnut, enclosing each a stout porcelain pan: each pan is furnished with an air-tight glass cover. On the upper edge of each box is a groove for holding the plate. On withdrawing the glass cover of the iodine pan, the plate is exposed to its action, and the colour produced is observed by holding a sheet of white paper in such a position that its reflection may be seen on the plate, which enables the operator to judge of the progress of the operation. When the plate has obtained the required colour, the glass cover is pushed in, so as to cover the iodine pan, and the cover over the bromine pan is withdrawn. The plate is now removed from the iodine box and placed over the bromine box, and the colour observed as before. When the plate has received the proper amount of bromine, which is perceptible by the colour, the cover of the bromine pan is pushed in, and the plate is again placed over the iodine pan for a few seconds, until the ultimate colour required is produced, and it is then ready for removal to the camera.
 
d. Improved Mercury Box, of walnut, with sliding legs, iron cistern, glass windows for inspecting the development of the picture, mounted with thermometer for ascertaining the temperature of the mercury ?
 
e e Are plate holders, with clamp for securing the same.
 
f. Is a box for holding the daguerreotype plates.
 
g. A levelling stand, used in the fixing process, see page 251. h. A flat peculiar dish for washing, see fig. 1, page 14.
 
i. Is a hand-buff.
 
[Daguerreotype Apparatus No.2686 which used this illustration was also published in the No.7, March 1852, "A Descriptive and Illustrated Catalogue of Photographic Apparatus, Microscopes, Tool Chests, Cabinets of Minerals, etc." (John Joseph Griffin and Company, London and Richard Griffin & Co., Glasgow).] 
 
 
  

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