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Hill & Adamson 
Lady Ruthven 
[Camera Work, no. 11, 1905] 
1845 (taken) 1905 (print) 
  
Photogravure 
8 x 5.9 ins 
  
Archive Farms 
Object No. 2016.532 
  
 
LL/90787 
  
Photogravure printed by James Craig Annan.
 
Publication:
Camera Work XI, 1905
 
Heinrich Schwarz, David Octavius Hill, Der Meister Der Photographer, Insel-Verlag, Leipzig, 1931, pl 74
 
Anna Tellgren, Another Story, Photography from the Moderna Museet Collection, Steidl, 2001, fig 239
 
Robert Doty, Photography as a Fine Art, George Eastman House, Rochester, 1960, pg 12
 
David Octavius Hill & Robert Adamson, Museum Ludwig/Agfa Phot-Historama, Steidl, Gottingen, 2000, pg 143, Cat 97
 
Sara Stevenson, Facing The Light, Scottish National Portrait Gallery, Edinburgh, 2002, pg 97
 
David Bruce, Sun Pictures, The Hill-Adamson Calotypes, New York Graphic Society, Greenwich, CT, 1973, pg 209
 
Sara Stevenson, The Personal Art of David Octavius Hill, Yale University Press, New Haven, 2002, pl 8
 
Robert Adamson from the University of St Andrews, Davison Art Center, Wesleyan University, Middletown, 2003, fig 3, pg 51
 
Lady Mary Ruthven (1789-1885), was the wife of Lord Ruthven and a friend of Sir Walter Scott. The vast majority of Hill and Adamson photographs show the ministers of the Free Church, notable residents of Edinburgh and distinguished visitors, or the hardy fisherfolk of Newhaven and Saint Andrews. On occasion, particularly in their portraits of the ministers-sober and all dressed alike-Hill and Adamson fell into formulaic patterns based on academic portrait painting. But there is no doubt that they were among the medium's most gifted portraitists, and one need only look at works such as this mysterious portrait of Lady Ruthven-reminiscent of Victorian fashion plates-to understand that Hill and Adamson possessed not only a profound human sensitivity but also a creative and sophisticated formal sensibility. (source: MET) 
 

 
  
 
  
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