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HomeContentsThemes > Salt prints

Contents

Information requests
697.01   Improving content on photographic techniques
Introduction
697.02   Early paper prints and their confusing terminology
Examples
697.03   Painted salt prints
697.04   Blanquart-Evrard process prints
697.05   Louis-Désiré Blanquart-Evrard: reproductions of works of art
697.06   Salt prints: Stereo
Photographers
697.07   Henry Fox Talbot: The Pencil of Nature (1844-1846)
697.08   Henry Fox Talbot: Sun Pictures in Scotland (1845)
697.09   Henry Fox Talbot: The Bertoloni Album
697.10   William Henry Fox Talbot: Waxed paper negatives
697.11   Hill & Adamson: Portraits
697.12   Hill & Adamson: A Series of Calotype Views - St. Andrews (1846)
697.13   Hill & Adamson: Scottish presbyterians
697.14   Hill & Adamson: Disruption of the Church of Scotland (1843)
697.15   Hill & Adamson: Newhaven
697.16   Auguste Salzmann: Jerusalem
697.17   John Beasly Greene: Le Nil (1854)
697.18   John Stewart: Pyrenees (1850s)
697.19   Pompeo Bondini: Italy
697.20   Roger Fenton: Russia (1852)
697.21   George Robinson Fardon: San Francisco Album. Photographs of the Most Beautiful Views and Public Buildings of San Francisco (1856-1857)
697.22   Louis-Camille d'Olivier: Nudes
697.23   Exhibition of the Works of Industry of All Nations, 1851 (1852)
Themes
697.24   Salt prints: Backgrounds
697.25   Salt prints: Exteriors
697.26   Salt prints: Portraits
697.27   Salt prints: Occupations and roles
697.28   Salt prints: Military
697.29   Salt prints: Objects
697.30   Salt prints: Panoramas
697.31   Salt prints: Still life
The fading of salt prints
697.32   Photographic Society of London: Fading Committee (1855)
This theme includes example sections and will be revised and added to as we proceed. Suggestions for additions, improvements and the correction of factual errors are always appreciated.
 
  
Information requests 
  
697.01   Process and product >  Improving content on photographic techniques 
  
We are seeking to expand the themes covering photographic techniques and processes. These sections will include:
  • Invention of the process
     
  • Any related patents
     
  • Trade literature
     
  • Contemporary advertisements and announcements of the innovation
     
  • A description of the process and its variants
     
  • Historical examples and details of where examples can be located in public collections
     
  • Contemporary examples by photographers using the exact process.
Conservation will not initially be included but may be in the future if required.
 
  
Introduction 
  
697.02   Process and product >  Early paper prints and their confusing terminology 
  
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The terminology used for early paper-based photographs is at first confusing and even now the terms are not used consistently. From its invention in around 1834 through to it declining popularity in the 1850s there was considerable experimentation taking place with different formulations of developers and fixers, types of papers and how the resulting print could be protected against fading.
Photogenic drawings  
  
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Henry Fox Talbot: Photogenic drawings 
  
In 1802 Humphry Davy reported in the Journal of the Royal Institution (London) on the experiments of Thomas Wedgwood into light sensitive chemicals and the camera obscura.[1] It was this chemical property that Henry Fox Talbot investigated in 1834 after his failure to draw with a camera lucida and an investigative zeal to discover a scientific means to preserve images of nature.[2]  
  
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Henry Fox Talbot: Some Account of the Art of Photogenic Drawing or the Process by Which Natural Objects May be Made to Delineate Themselves Without the Aid of the Artist's Pencil (1839) 
  
Talbot's 1839 publication on Photogenic drawings was hurried by Arago's announcement of the Daguerreotype on 7 January 1839. During the five years of experimentation carried out by Henry Fox Talbot he had created paper-based photographs in various colours but methods of preserving the images in a stable form had eluded him until his friend John Herschel proposed a "washing agent" that would halt the development process. Now this "washing agent" is known by photographers as "hypo"[3] or "fixer".[4] The Photogenic drawing was an early form of photography but it lacked the clarity and stability of the Daguerreotype but it remains the ancestor of calotypes and cameraless photographs such as photograms.
 
Calotypes  
  
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Henry Fox Talbot: Calotypes 
  
The calotype process used high quality writing paper sensitized with solutions of potassium iodide and light-sensitive silver nitrate and was invented by Henry Fox Talbot in 1840 and patented by him in 1841. The paper once exposed in the camera is developed in a solution of gallic acid being out the "latent image" and silver nitrate and fixed. The resulting paper print can then be waxed creating a translucent waxed paper negative which can be used to make further positive salt prints.
 
Salt prints / Salted paper prints  
  
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Henry Fox Talbot: Salt prints 
  
 
  
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Hill & Adamson: Salt prints, from calotype negatives 
  
The process of making salt prints, had numerous variations over the years, but was primarily the use of a high quality handmade writing paper or a mould-made watercolour paper, soaked in a salt solution[5] and dried. The paper was brushed with a light-sensitive silver nitrate solution in a darkened environment and this was left to dry. The photographer then paper a calotype or a waxed paper negative in a printing frame over the previously unexposed prepared paper and leave in sunlight until the correct level of exposure. The new salt print could then be washed in water to halt development by removing excess silver nitrate. The print could then be "fixed" with sodium thiosulphate, washed again and finally dried.
 
Talbotypes  
  
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Talbotypes 
  
A Talbotype is a synonym for a calotype and although the term was not approved of by Henry Fox Talbot the term was used by others including Nicolaas Henneman[6] in England and Frederick and William Langenheim[7] in America.
 
Waxed paper negatives  
  
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Henry Fox Talbot: Waxed paper negatives 
  
 
  
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Charles Nègre: Waxed paper negatives 
  
 
  
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W. & F. Langenheim: Waxed paper negatives 
  
Daguerreotypes were a positive image and could only be copied by rephotographing the original plate.[8] The calotype process of Henry Fox Talbot allowed for the creation of a negative that could be used to make as many further copies as were required. By waxing the calotype with melted beeswax the translucency of the paper was improved and it had the advantage of acting as a barrier to further chemical reactions.
The early years of photography were full of experimentation and many amateur photographers, chemists and enthusiasts experimented with formulae and process. Louis-Désiré Blanquart-Evrard,[9] Thomas Sutton[10] and Gustave Le Gray all came out with variants of the process and P.F. Mathieu introduced the gold toning of salt prints in 1847.[11]
 
As the albumen print was introduced so there became as sorted of combinations of two processes using both paper and glass negatives and variant processes making accurate determination of the process based solely upon visual characteristics difficult if not impossible.[12]  
  
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Comte Frédéric Flachéron: The Tiber, Rome (1853) 
  
 
  
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John Murray: Albumen print, from waxed paper negative 
  
The labels applied by curators and photo-historians continue to be confusing for example the prints used in Henry Fox Talbot's Pencil of Nature are referred to as calotypes when they should probably be salt prints
  
Examples 
  
697.03   Process and product >  Painted salt prints 
  
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Charle Johan Bergamasco: Hand-coloured Russian portraits on salted paper 
  
 
  
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James Robertson: Painted salt prints 
  
 
  
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John Nicolas Laverty: Hand-coloured salt prints (adjusted) 
  
 
  
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Georg Jacob Gattineau: German fencing students 
  
 
  
697.04   Process and product >  Blanquart-Evrard process prints 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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697.05   Process and product >  Louis-Désiré Blanquart-Evrard: reproductions of works of art 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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Louis-Désiré Blanquart-Evrard was a cloth merchant from Lille, France who took up the calotype process and in 1847 published a method for a negative/positive paper process.[13] He used this process to print and publish the works of other photographers.
 
By 1851 taking advantage of his own innovations he was able to print two or three hundred prints a day from the same negative and this rapid production allowed the creation of salt paper prints that could be tipped-in[14] to books.[15] Key books and albums of prints by John Beasly Greene, Charles Marville, Auguste Salzmann and Henri Le Secq were printed by Blanquart-Evrard and included:
Maxime Du Camp, 1852, Egypte, Nubie, Palestine et Syrie [Egypt, Nubia, Palestine and Syria], (Paris: Gide et J. Baudry) [Published in installments starting in September 1851]
 
John Beasley Greene, John Beasley, 1854, Le Nil - monuments - paysages [The Nile - Monuments - Landscapes], (Lille: Imprimerie Photographique de Blanquart-Evrard) [2 volumes]
 
Auguste Salzmann, 1856, Jérusalem. Etude et reproduction photographique des monuments de la Ville Sainte depuis l'époque judaïque jusqu'à nos jours par Auguste Salzmann, chargé par le Ministère de l'instruction publique d'une mission scientifique en Orient [Jerusalem: Photographs of the Monuments of the Holy City], (Paris: Gide et J. Baudry)
The ability to make large numbers of copies of works of art allowed institutions and students to obtain high quality and accurate reproductions for the first time. This created a mass market for art reproductions that Adolphe Braun[16] would later make a key part of his printing business.
 
In 1856 with Thomas Sutton he founded the magazine Photographic Notes, a journal which continued for eleven years. 
  
697.06   Process and product >  Salt prints: Stereo 
  
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Photographers 
  
697.07   Process and product >  Henry Fox Talbot: The Pencil of Nature (1844-1846) 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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Whilst the announcement of the daguerreotype in 1839 was a stimulus to the work of Henry Fox Talbot[17] it was he who fully appreciated to range of possibilities and there was no other photographer or innovator who expressed it as well. His book The Pencil of Nature was visionary in so many ways - Talbot appreciated the advantage of a negative / positive process and provided exemplars of how photography could be used for distinct purposes. Nothing says it clearer than his own words:
The Pencil of Nature
Introductory Remarks
 
The little work now presented to the Public is the first attempt to publish a series of plates or pictures wholly executed by the new art of Photogenic Drawing, without any aid whatever from the artist's pencil.
 
The term “Photography” is now so well known, that an explanation of it is perhaps superfluous; yet, as some persons may still be unacquainted with the art, even by name, its discovery being still of very recent date, a few words may be looked for of general explanation.
 
It may suffice, then, to say, that the plates of this work have been obtained by the mere action of Light upon sensitive paper. They have been formed or depicted by optical and chemical means alone, and without the aid of any one acquainted with the art of drawing. It is needless, therefore, to say that they differ in all respects, and as widely us possible, in their origin, from plates of the ordinary kind, which owe their existence to the united skill of the Artist and the Engraver.
 
They are impressed by Nature's hand; and what they want as yet of delicacy and finish of execution arises chiefly from our want of sufficient knowledge of her laws. When we have learnt more, by experience, respecting the formation of such pictures, they will doubtless be brought much nearer to perfection; and though we may not be able to conjecture with any certainty what rank they may hereafter attain to as pictorial productions, they will surely find their own sphere of utility, both for completeness of detail and correctness of perspective.
 
The Author of the present work having been so fortunate as to discover, about ten years ago, the principles and practice of Photogenic Drawing, is desirous that the first specimen of an Art, likely in all probability to be much employed in future, should be published in the country where it was first discovered. And he makes no doubt that his countrymen will deem such an intention sufficiently laudable to induce them to excuse the imperfections necessarily incident to a first attempt to exhibit an Art of so great singularity, which employs processes entirely new, and having no analogy to any thing in use before. That such imperfections will occur in a first essay, must indeed be expected. At present the Art can hardly be said to have advanced beyond its infancy—at any rate, it is yet in a very early stage—and its practice is often impeded by doubts and difficulties, which, with increasing knowledge, will diminish and disappear. Its progress will be more rapid when more minds are devoted to its improvement, and when more of skilful manual assistance is employed in the manipulation of its delicate processes; the paucity of which skilled assistance at the present moment the Author finds one of the chief difficulties in his way.[18]
 
  
   Calotype 
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697.08   Process and product >  Henry Fox Talbot: Sun Pictures in Scotland (1845) 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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William Henry Fox Talbot , one of the inventors of photography, was one of the first to produce a book that included landscape photographs.
 
In autumn 1844 he took a trip to Scotland where he photographed locations that were associated with Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832), the author of the popular Waverley novels, and Talbot‘s visit to Edinburgh may have coincided with the completion of the Scott Monument.
 
The photographs that Talbot took in Scotland included the Scott Monument, Abbotsford, Melrose Abbey, Dryburgh Abbey and Loch Katrine. The Scottish mountains of the Trossachs and the waters of Loch Katrine had inspired Sir Walter Scott‘s popular poem The Lady of the Lake (1810) and this was the reason for the selection of the site by Fox Talbot. His photograph of the loch stands out as a particularly fine example of early British landscape photography.
 
The one guinea book Sun Pictures in Scotland was sold by subscription and 120 copies were bound. One of the original handwritten lists of subscribers is preserved at the NMPFT in Bradford (UK).
 
[Thanks to Larry Schaaf for his help on this.] 
  
697.09   Process and product >  Henry Fox Talbot: The Bertoloni Album 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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Henry Fox Talbot sent examples of his photogenic drawings of botanical specimens to Italian botanist Antonio Bertoloni (1775-1869)[19] that are preserved in an album at the Metropolitan Museum of Art
  
697.10   Process and product >  William Henry Fox Talbot: Waxed paper negatives 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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697.11   Process and product >  Hill & Adamson: Portraits 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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Salt print portraits on paper made using calotype paper negatives are visually so different from daguerreotypes. The silvered metal plate of the daguerreotype has the advantage of incredible detail in the hands of master photographers like , J.E. Mayall or William Edward Kilburn there could be a sensitivity in the posing. With some photographers the painting of the daguerreotype transferred them into the realm of the miniature. The salt print does not have this accuracy and if we discount the advantages it has over the metal plate of the daguerreotype[20] there is a less tangible advantage. The daguerreotype even in the hands of the best operator has formality that takes the sitter into the unreal world of the paused moment. With the salt print the softness of the detail creates a mood almost a dreamlike state of reflection which is closer to capturing the personality and characteristics of the sitter. As David Octavius Hill of the Hill & Adamson partnership in Edinburgh wrote in a letter in 1849:
The rough surface & unequal texture throughout the paper is the main cause of the calotype failing in details, before the process of Daguerreotypy - & this is the very life of it. They look like the imperfect work of man - and not the diminished perfect work of God.[21]
 
  
   1 Hill Adamson 
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697.12   Process and product >  Hill & Adamson: A Series of Calotype Views - St. Andrews (1846) 
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Hill & Adamson were two of the leading Calotypists of Edinburgh which was a hotbed of innovation and the practical application of photography in the 1840s. In 1846 they published A Series of Calotype Views - St. Andrews[22] which is one of the earliest books of cityscapes
  
697.13   Process and product >  Hill & Adamson: Scottish presbyterians 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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697.14   Process and product >  Hill & Adamson: Disruption of the Church of Scotland (1843) 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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David Octavius Hill was a talented landscape painter and lithographer based in Edinburgh in Scotland. In 1843 when there was the Disruption of the Church of Scotland he vowed to create a painting that would commemorate the occasion and include the portraits of the nearly five hundred church ministers involved.[23] Sir David Brewster proposed that calotypes would reduce the labour of sketches and introduced Hill to Robert Adamson who was a chemist and had recently established a calotype studio on Carlton Hill in Edinburgh. The partnership was fortuitous indeed as their skills were an ideal match until Adamson's early death in January 1848.
 
A surviving letter from David Octavius Hill to the Revd Dr Gordon dated 9 June 1843 provides the context:
9 June 1843
 
Mr D.O.Hill presents his respectful compliments to the Revd Dr Gordon and requests that he will favor him by giving him a sitting for his portrait with a view to its being made use of in Mr Hills prospective Historical Picture of “The First General Assembly of the Free Protesting Church of Scotland” – a work undertaken with the sanction and approval of the Reverend Moderator and a number of the leading members of assembly, and friends of the Church. The preliminary studies of the portraits for this work will in the first instance be made by the use of the Daguerreotype and Calotype – and as Mr Hill has made the necessary arrangements with Mr Adamson a gentleman recommended to him by Sir David Brewster as an adept in the latter process, he requests that Dr Gordon will consent to meet him at Mr Adamson’s house – Calton Stairs (at the top of the first flight of steps leading to the Hill from Waterloo Place) on Saturday the 10th Instant between the hours of 10 A M and 2 P.M. or on the Monday, Tuesday, or Wednesday following at the same time. The sitter is detained only a very short time – the whole process being affected in a few minutes. Should none of these days suit Dr Gordon’s convenience, Mr Hill will make it his business to attend any other day and hour he may appoint.[24]
Even using hundreds of calotypes the completion of the painting took many years and carbon prints of the final version were offered for public sale as was announced in The Photographic News on 29th June 1866:
The subject is one full of interest to every one who can admire heroic self-abnegation in the assertion of principle, and to Scotchmen will possess in especial value as an illustration of national character, whatever their especial views on the question at issue. It is a picture commemorative of the Disruption in the Church of Scotland in 1843. The subject is the "Signing of the Deed of Demission," painted by Mr. D. O. Hill, Secretary to the Royal Scottish Academy, a gentleman whoso name has been many years associated with a deep interest in the art capacity of photography, and with some of the most artistic calotype portraits ever produced. The picture contains nearly five hundred portraits of ministers of the Scotch Church, who gave up livings, manses, glebes in short, all the temporalities which their connection with the Church gave them in the assertion of liberty of conscience.[25]
The vast painting hangs the offices of the Free Church of Scotland[26] and amongst the hundreds of faces a small David Octavius Hill can be seen with a camera. 
  
697.15   Process and product >  Hill & Adamson: Newhaven 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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The short partnership of David Octavius Hill and Robert Adamson starting in 1843 and ending with Adamson's early death in January 1848 was remarkable in many ways. It started with the creation of calotypes for the painting commemorating the Disruption of the Church of Scotland[27] and quickly moved into other collaborative projects.  
  
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In the nineteenth century Newhaven was a fishing village two miles north of the city center of Edinburgh in Scotland. The lower floors of houses stored nets and fishing equipment and the 'forstair' led up to the living accommodation and houses like this are still there today.[28]
 
Hill & Adamson took numerous portraits of fishermen, their wives and children involved in their work during the 1840s. These remain as an outstanding documentary project of occupational portraits taken outside at a time when most portraits where taken in a studio.[29] 
  
   1 Hill Adamson Newhaven 
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697.16   Process and product >  Auguste Salzmann: Jerusalem 
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There have been many photographers who travel to a famous location and photograph it but don't see the evidence it presents. They collect visual memories with a camera to document places and sites but little more. Auguste Salzmann (1824-1872) was fundamentally different and this requires stressing - no other early photographer saw the way he did as an archaeologist. His 1856 volume Jérusalem. Etude et reproduction photographique des monuments de la Ville Sainte[30] included salt prints made using waxed paper negatives and printed by Blanquart-Evrard. The important factor here is what he saw and why.
 
Archaeology has fundamental rules related to stratigraphy and the way the architectural features have changed over time that give us indication as to dating. A blocked up window or doorway, changes in the types of stone in a section, ornamental stonework of differing styles are all clues to the understanding of temporal sequences and the changing cultures of a region. Auguste Salzmann was a rare person who recognised this and by looking at some examples of his work his analytical appreciation is immediately evident.  
  
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Auguste Salzmann: Evidence of archaeological analysis 
  
In these stratigraphic sections the changes of the rocks and shaped blocks indicate different building periods. His photograph of three blocked Roman arched doorways highlights how there have been changes to the use of a building over the centuries. A blocked up doorway at the Church of the Holy Sepulchre may indicate a need for increased security or a change of use. These are clues in stone. Auguste Salzmann went on to excavate on the island of Rhodes and some of his archaeological finds went to the British Museum in London.[31]
 
These photographs are unusual as they show the mind set and training of the photographer.[32] 
  
697.17   Process and product >  John Beasly Greene: Le Nil (1854) 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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John Beasly Greene (1832-1856) was a short-lived French-born archaeologist and photographer who was a student of Gustave Le Gray.[33] In 1853 he left France for Egypt and Nubia to explore and document the archaeological sites. He is known for the ninety-four prints in Le Nil - monuments - paysages (1854)[34] that documents his work along the River Nile in Egypt. He later carried out archaeological excavations in Thebes that were published in 1855.[35] 
  
697.18   Process and product >  John Stewart: Pyrenees (1850s) 
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697.19   Process and product >  Pompeo Bondini: Italy 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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697.20   Process and product >  Roger Fenton: Russia (1852) 
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In August 1852 Roger Fenton went to Russia with engineer Charles Blacker Vignoles who was building a suspension bridge over the Dnieper River at Kiev. Fenton photographed in St. Petersburg, Moscow and Kiev during the visit and exibited three of his photographs of Russia at the Society of Arts exhibition in London that opened in December 1852.[36] 
  
697.21   Process and product >  George Robinson Fardon: San Francisco Album. Photographs of the Most Beautiful Views and Public Buildings of San Francisco (1856-1857) 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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George Robinson Fardon (1806-1886) with his series of albumenized salt paper prints in San Francisco Album. Photographs of the Most Beautiful Views and Public Buildings of San Francisco (1856-1857) has the distinction of creating the first album of photographs on an American city ever published.[37]
 
Fardon arrived in San Francisco in 1856 and had a Daguerreian Studio at 203 Clay Street in 1859. The book George Robinson Fardon. San Francisco Album: Photographs of the Most Beautiful Views and Public Buildings (San Francisco: Fraenkel Galleries, Hans P. Kraus, Jr. and Chronicle Books, 1999) includes a catalogue of the 65 known San Francisco views and their variants by Fardon. Although this is a small number of plates and only nine copies of the complete album are known the importance of a photographic series showing the urban development of an American city is difficult to over emphasize.
 
Fardon later moved to Victoria on Vancouver Island and became one of the earliest photographers on the West Coast of Canada. He first opened a studio at 68 Government Street and in 1864 moved to Langley Street. He died on 20th August 1886 and was buried at Ross Bay Cemetery in Victoria. 
  
   George Robinson  Fardon 
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697.22   Process and product >  Louis-Camille d'Olivier: Nudes 
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697.23   Process and product >  Exhibition of the Works of Industry of All Nations, 1851 (1852) 
  
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Themes 
  
697.24   Process and product >  Salt prints: Backgrounds 
  
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697.25   Process and product >  Salt prints: Exteriors 
  
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697.26   Process and product >  Salt prints: Portraits 
  
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Amidst the commonplace formality of most early photography we can find rarer salt prints with a refreshing spontaneity despite relately long exposure times.  
  
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Spontaneity 
  
 
  
697.27   Process and product >  Salt prints: Occupations and roles 
  
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It may well be a generalization that will require further analysis but there does appear to be a difference between daguerreotypes and salt print occupationals. Although some salt print occupationals were taken in photographic studios they were also taken outside in informal situations.  
  
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Hill & Adamson: Newhaven 
  
The series by Hill & Adamson taken at Newhaven in Scotland[38] is an outstanding example of this. 
  
697.28   Process and product >  Salt prints: Military 
  
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697.29   Process and product >  Salt prints: Objects 
  
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697.30   Process and product >  Salt prints: Panoramas 
  
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George Robinson Fardon (1807-1886) took daguerreotypes and salt prints in San Francisco from around 1854 until 1858. His San Francisco Album,[39] which exists in a number of variants each containing around 30 salt prints, is considered the first compilation on any American city.  
  
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George Robinson Fardon: San Francisco Album (1856) 
  
What is less commonly appreciated is that six of the 30 salt prints in the San Francisco Album can be placed together to form a single panorama and there is a seventh Fardon print that extends it.[40] 
  
697.31   Process and product >  Salt prints: Still life 
  
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The fading of salt prints 
  
697.32   Process and product >  Photographic Society of London: Fading Committee (1855) 
  
The issue of the fading of positive photographic pictures of paper was repeatedly raised as a concern between the 1840s and the 1860s and numerous articles were published in both photographic journals and more popular publications in Great Britain. In 1855 the Photographic Society of London established a committee to investigate and report on the "Fading of Photographs". The seven person committee consisted of Philip H. Delamotte, Hugh W. Diamond, T. Frederick Hardwich, T.A. Malone, John Percy, Henry Pollock and Geo. Shadbolt.
 
The Committee reported in late 1855 that the causes of fading were due to multiple factors, including poor washing leaving harmful chemical residues in the paper and the presence of "sulphuretted hydrogen" and water in the London atmosphere - perhaps not surprising given the levels of pollution in Victorian London.
 
The Committee made four suggestions:[41]
  1. That the greatest care should be bestowed upon the washing of the prints after the use of hyposulphite of soda, and for this purpose hot water is very much better than cold.
     
  2. The majority of the Committee think that gold, in some form, should be used in the preparation of pictures, although every variety of tint may be obtained without it.
     
  3. That photographs be kept dry.
     
  4. That trials be made of substances likely to protect the prints from air and moisture, such as caoutchouc, gutta percha, wax, and the different varnishes.
The report had been diligently prepared but there was no solution for the fading prints created prior to it and the issue continued to effect calotypes. 
  
 
  

Footnotes 
  
  1. Λ Humphry Davy, 1802, ‘An Account of a Method of Copying Paintings upon Glass, and of Making Profiles, by the Agency of Light upon Nitrate of Silver. Invented by T. Wedgwood, Esq.‘, Journal of the Royal Institution (London), vol. 1, p. 170 [Reprinted in: Litchfield, Richart Buckley, 1903 "Tom Wedgwood, Journals of the Royal Institution: Davy's 'Account.'" In The First Photographer (London: Duckworth and Co.), pp. 188-195
     
    Geoffrey Batchen, 1993, Summer, ‘Tom Wedgwood and Humphry Davy, 'An Account of a Method'‘, History of Photography, vol. 17, no. 2, pp. 172-183 
      
  2. Λ Henry Fox Talbot, 1839, 9 February, ‘Photogenic Drawing. Some Account of the Art of Photogenic Drawing, or the Process by which Natural Objects may be made to delineate themselves without the aid of the Artist's Pencil‘, The Athenaeum, no. 589, pp. 114-117; Henry Fox Talbot, 1839, Some Account of the Art of Photogenic Drawing or the Process by Which Natural Objects May be Made to Delineate Themselves Without the Aid of the Artist’s Pencil, (London: London: R. and J. E. Taylor) 
      
  3. Λ Incidentally for those who enjoy connections "Hypo" was the name of William Henry Jackson's mule. 
      
  4. Λ Larry J. Schaaf, 1990, '"A Wonderful Illustration of Modern Necromancy": Significant Talbot Experimental Prints in the J. Paul Getty Museum', IN J. Paul Getty Museum, 1990, Photography: Discovery and Invention : Papers Delivered at a Symposium Celebrating the Invention of Photography, (Getty Publications), pp. 31-46 
      
  5. Λ The salt solution varied but used by sodium chloride or sodium citrate and ammonium chloride. The combinations varied. 
      
  6. Λ The studio stamp for "Henneman & Co, 122 Regent Strt. London" was "Patent Talbotype in Sun Pictures". 
      
  7. Λ W. & F. Langenheim in the New York Herald, 31 January 1850, advertised:
    Talbotype Likenesses on Paper. - The advantages of these new likenesses gain for them greater popularity everyday. The subscribers are prepared to take likenesses of all sizes, up to the size of life, singly or in groups. Valuable daguerreotypes of deceased of absent friends copied on paper or ivory. The public are invited to examine specimens at our rooms, 201 Broadway.

    Λ Daguerreotypes were copied in numerous ways see - Erin Waters, 2013, "Daguerreotypes in Duplicate: A Survey of Copy Photography", The Daguerreian Annual, pp. 144-196 
      

  8. Λ Louis Desire Blanquart-Evrard, 1847, Procedes Employes pour Obtenir les Epreuves de Photographie sur Papier Presenter a l'Academie des Science, (Paris: Charles Chevalier) 
      
  9. Λ T. Sutton, 1856, The Calotype Process. A Handbook to Photography on Paper, (New York: H. H. Snelling) 
      
  10. Λ P.F. Mathieu, 1847, Auto-Photographie, ou Me´thode de Reproduction par la Lumie`re des Dessins, Lithographies, Gravures, etc. ; sans l'emploi du daguerre´otype, (Paris)
    (Accessed: 2 September 2014)
    archive.org/stream/gri_33125010707178 
      
  11. Λ For a detailed chemical analysis of salt prints see: Dusan Stulik & Art Kaplan, 2013, The Atlas of Analytical Signatures of Photographic Processes: Salt print, (Los Angeles: The Getty Conservation Institute)
    (Accessed: 2 September 2014)
    www.getty.edu/conservation/publications_resources/pdf_publications/pdf/atlas_saltprint.pdf 
      
  12. Λ Louis-Désiré Blanquart-Évrard, 1847, Procédés employés pour obtenir les épreuves de photographie sur papier, présentés à l'Académie des sciences, (Paris: C. Chevalier) 
      
  13. Λ Tipped-in - ILAB: International League of Antiquarian Booksellers
    (Accessed: 7 November 2013)
    www.ilab.org/eng/glossary/557-tipped-in.html
    Attached to, but not integral to the binding of the book. We usually use this term to indicate something that has been added: a letter from the author, a newspaper or magazine review or obituary, etc. The nature of what is tipped-in will determine whether this addition will enhance or devalue the book.
     
      
  14. Λ Isabelle Jammes, 1981, Blanquart-Évrard et les origines de l'édition photographique française. Catalogue raisonné des albums photographiques édités 1851-1855, (Geneve: Librairie Droz Sa) 
      
  15. Λ For Adolphe Braun - Christian Kempf, 1994, Adolphe Braun et la photographie 1812-1877, (Lucigraphie); Mary Bergstein, 2000, <>Image and enterprise: The photographs of Adolphe Braun, (London: Thames & Hudson) 
      
  16. Λ Henry Fox Talbot, 1839, Some Account of the Art of Photogenic Drawing or the Process by Which Natural Objects May be Made to Delineate Themselves Without the Aid of the Artist’s Pencil, (London: London: R. and J. E. Taylor); Henry Fox Talbot, 1839, 9 February, ‘Photogenic Drawing. Some Account of the Art of Photogenic Drawing, or the Process by which Natural Objects may be made to delineate themselves without the aid of the Artist's Pencil‘, The Athenaeum, no. 589, pp. 114-117 
      
  17. Λ H. Fox Talbot, 1844, The Pencil of Nature, (London: Longman, Brown, Green and Longmans), Introductory remarks 
      
  18. Λ For Henry Fox Talbot and the Bertoloni Album - Malcolm Daniel, 1992, ‘L’Album Bertoloni‘, in 1992, Fotografia & Fotografi a Bologna, 1839-1900, (Bologna: Grafis); Graham Smith, 1993, ‘Talbot and Botany: The Bertoloni Album‘, History of Photography, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 33-48 
      
  19. Λ Letter from David Octavius Hill to Hanry Sanford Bicknell, 17 January 1849 (George Eastman House, Rochester, NY). Quoted in Hans P. Kraus, Jr.; text by Larry J. Schaff with Russell Lord, 2009, Sun Pictures: Catalogue Nineteen. Silver Anniversary, (New York: Hans P. Kraus, Jr.), p. 18 
      
  20. Λ Cost of paper over metal plates, ease of transport, availability and above all the use of a negative so multiple prints could be made. 
      
  21. Λ D.O. Hill and R. Adamson, 1846, A Series of Calotype Views - St. Andrews, (Edinburgh)
     
    Copies of this series are rare - St. Andrews University Library, Special Collections / The Photographic Collection, Record: ALB22-1, General Album 22 
      
  22. Λ David Octavius Hill, 1866, "The First General Assembly of the Free Church of Scotland - Signing the Act of Separation and the Deed of Demission at Tanfield, Edinburgh, May 1843", Oil painting, 5 foot x 11 foot 4 inches (1.53m x 3.45m), Free Church of Scotland [This photograph was taken by Rev George T. Thomson LRPS and is provided with the permission of the Free Church of Scotland.] 
      
  23. Λ An example letter from "Hill, D O, to the subjects of the Disruption picture, here filled in to Dr Gordon, 9 June 1843"
    New College Library (Free Church of Scotland), autograph folder 240
    [Open, lithographed letter]
    DOH to the subjects of the Disruption picture, here filled in to Dr Gordon, 9 June 1843
    Source: scottishphotography.org/?page_id=285 
      
  24. Λ June 29, 1866, "Large Carbon Reproductions", The Photographic News: A Weekly Record of the Progress of Photography, vol. X, no. 408, pp. 304-305. 
      
  25. Λ Free Church of Scotland, 15 North Bank Street, The Mound, Edinburgh EH1 2LS, Scotland. Tel: 0131 226 5286 
      
  26. Λ David Octavius Hill, 1866, "The First General Assembly of the Free Church of Scotland - Signing the Act of Separation and the Deed of Demission at Tanfield, Edinburgh, May 1843", Oil painting, 5 foot x 11 foot 4 inches (1.53m x 3.45m), Free Church of Scotland [This photograph was taken by Rev George T. Thomson LRPS and is provided with the permission of the Free Church of Scotland.] 
      
  27. Λ Newhaven, Edinburgh - Wikipedia
    (Accessed: 20 August 2013)
    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newhaven,_Edinburgh 
      
  28. Λ Sara Stevenson, 1990, Hill and Adamson's The Fishermen and Women of the Firth of Forth, (Edinburgh: National Galleries of Scotland) 
      
  29. Λ For the publication of Auguste Salzmann of Jerusalem - Auguste Salzmann, 1856, Jérusalem. Etude et reproduction photographique des monuments de la Ville Sainte depuis l'époque judaïque jusqu'à nos jours par Auguste Salzmann, chargé par le Ministère de l'instruction publique d'une mission scientifique en Orient, [Jerusalem: Photographs of the Monuments of the Holy City], (Paris: Gide et J. Baudry) 
      
  30. Λ Auguste Salzmann was later involved in archaeological excavations on the island of Rhodes with some of his finds going to the British Museum - 1862, 2 June (Ordered), "Antiquities from Camirus, in the Island of Rhodes", The Finance Accounts I.-VII. of The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, for the Financial Year 1861-1862 (House of Commons) in the section on "Accounts, Estimates, &c. of the British Museum", pp. 16-17. 
      
  31. Λ I know of no other nineteenth photographer whose photographs show an understanding of archaeological principles as well of those of Auguste Salzmann. If you have other examples or suggestions I'd be most interested - alan@luminous-lint.com 
      
  32. Λ Danièle Méaux, 2009, ‘Monuments et Paysages de John B. Greene‘, History of Photography, vol. 33, no. 3, pp. 262-277
     
    John Beasly Greene - The J. Paul Getty Museum
    (Accessed: 11 November 2013)
    www.getty.edu/art/gettyguide/artMakerDetails?maker=1877 
      
  33. Λ John Beasley Greene, 1854, Le Nil - monuments - paysages [The Nile - Monuments - Landscapes], (Lille: Imprimerie Photographique de Blanquart-Evrard) [2 volumes]
     
    See also - Danièle Méaux, 2009, ‘Monuments et Paysages de John B. Greene‘, History of Photography, vol. 33, no. 3, pp. 262-277 
      
  34. Λ John Beasly Greene, 1855, Fouilles exécutées à Thebes dans l'année 1855, texts hièroglyphiques et documents inédits, (Paris) 
      
  35. Λ London, Society of Arts, 18 John Street, Adelphi, London, 22 December 1852 - 29 January 1853
    (Accessed: 4 September 2013)
    peib.dmu.ac.uk/exhibitionDetail.php?exbtnid=1009&exhibitionTitle=1852%2C+London%2C+Society+of+Arts The three photographs of Russia by Roger Fenton included in this exhibition were:
     
    No. 135 - Kremlin, Moscow
    No. 334 - Kieff, Russia
    No. 365 - St. Saviour's Church, Moscow 
      
  36. Λ George Robinson Fardon, 1856, Photographs of the Most Beautiful Views and Public Buildings of San Francisco; George Robinson Fardon & Jeffrey Fraenkel, 1999, George Robinson Fardon. San Francisco Album: Photographs of the Most Beautiful Views and Public Buildings, (San Francisco: Fraenkel Galleries, Hans P. Kraus, Jr. and Chronicle Books) 
      
  37. Λ Sara Stevenson, 1990, Hill and Adamson's The Fishermen and Women of the Firth of Forth, (Edinburgh: National Galleries of Scotland) 
      
  38. Λ George Robinson Fardon, 1856, San Francisco Album: or European Photographs of the Most Beautiful Views and Public Buildings of San Francisco
     
    George Eastman House has a copy of the album that came from the Gabriel Cromer collection. 
      
  39. Λ Acquisitions/1992 - George Robinson Fardon, Panorama of San Francisco, May 1855, Seven salt prints on one original mount, 18.3 x 131.4 cm, 92.XM.44, [J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles]
    1993, The J. Paul Getty Journal, vol. 23, p. 81, no. 81 
      
  40. Λ Dec. 1, 1855, "Photographic Correspondence", Notes and Queries, pp. 436-437 
      

alan@luminous-lint.com

 
  

HomeContents > Further research

 
  
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General reading 
  
Aubenas, Sylvie & Roubert, Paul-Louis (eds.), 2010, Primitifs de la Photographie: Le Calotype en France 1843-1860, (Gallimard BNF) [Δ
  
Benson, Richard, 2008, The Printed Picture, (New York: Museum of Modern Art) isbn-10: 0870707213 isbn-13: 978-0870707216 [Δ
  
Gernsheim, Helmut & Gernsheim, Alison, 1982, The Origins of Photography. Vol. 1 of The History of Photography, (New York: Thames and Hudson) [Δ
  
Mathieu, P.F., 1847, Auto-Photographie, ou Me´thode de Reproduction par la Lumie`re des Dessins, Lithographies, Gravures, etc. ; sans l'emploi du daguerre´otype, (Paris) [Δ
  
Reilly, James M., 2012, The Albumen and Salted Paper Book, (RIT Press) isbn-13: 978-1933360782 [Δ
  
Stulik, Dusan & Kaplan, Art, 2013, The Atlas of Analytical Signatures of Photographic Processes: Salt print, (Los Angeles: The Getty Conservation Institute) [Δ
  
Taylor, Roger; with Larry J. Schaaf, 2007, Impressed by Light: British Photographs from Paper Negatives, 1840–1860, (New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art) [Δ
  
 
  
Readings on, or by, individual photographers 
  
Robert Adamson 
  
1999, Hill and Adamson: Photographs from the J. Paul Getty Museum, (J. Paul Getty Museum Publications) [In Focus series] [Δ
  
Bell, Keith (ed.), 1987, Photographs of David Octavius Hill and Robert Adamson, (Saskatoon: Mendell Art Gallery) [Δ
  
Bruce, David, 1973, Sun Pictures: The Hill-Adamson Calotypes, (Greenwich, CT: New York Graphic Society) [Δ
  
Ford, Colin (ed.), 1976, An Early Victorian Album: The Photographic Masterpieces (1843-1847) of David Octavius Hill and Robert Adamson, (New York: Alfred A. Knopf) [Δ
  
Harley Jr, Ralph L., 1986, ‘The D. O. Hill and Robert Adamson Partnership‘, History of Photography, vol. 10, no. 4, pp. 303-312 [Δ
  
Smith, Graham, 1983, ‘Calotype Views of St. Andrews' by David Octavius Hill and Robert Adamson‘, History of Photography, vol. 7, no. 3, pp. 207-236 [Δ
  
Stevenson, S., 1981, David Octavius Hill and Robert Adamson. Catalogue of their Calotypes taken between 1843 and 1847 in the Collection of the Scottish National Portrait Gallery, (Edinburgh: Scottish National Portrait Gallery) [Δ
  
Stevenson, Sara, 1990, Hill and Adamson's The Fishermen and Women of the Firth of Forth, (Edinburgh: National Galleries of Scotland) [Δ
  
Ward, John & Stevenson, Sara, 1986, Printed Light. The Scientific Art of William Henry Fox Talbot and David Octavius Hill with Robert Adamson, (Edinburgh: Scottish National Portrait Gallery & Her Majesty’s Stationery Office) [Δ
  
Louis-Désiré Blanquart-Evrard 
  
Blanquart-Evrard, Louis Desire, 1847, Procedes Employes pour Obtenir les Epreuves de Photographie sur Papier Presenter a l'Academie des Science, (Paris: Charles Chevalier) [Δ
  
Jammes, Isabelle, 1981, Blanquart-Évrard et les origines de l'édition photographique française. Catalogue raisonné des albums photographiques édités 1851-1855, (Geneve: Librairie Droz Sa) [Δ
  
Maxime Du Camp 
  
Dewachter, Michel & Daniel Oster, 1987, Un voyageur en Egypte vers 1850: Le Nil de Maxime Du Camp, (Paris: Sand/Conti) [Δ
  
Du Camp, Maxime, 1852, Egypte, Nubie, Palestine et Syrie [Egypt, Nubia, Palestine and Syria], (Paris: Gide et J. Baudry) [Published in installments starting in September 1851] [Δ
  
Jammes, Isabelle, 1981, Blanquart-Évrard et les origines de l'édition photographique française. Catalogue raisonné des albums photographiques édités 1851-1855, (Geneve: Librairie Droz Sa) [Δ
  
Claude-Marie Ferrier 
  
Cameron, John B. & Schimmelman, Janice G., 2012, The Early Paper Stereoviews of Claude-Marie Ferrier, 1852-1858, (The Collodion Press - Privately printed - Blurb / 3400181) [Δ
  
David Octavius Hill 
  
1999, Hill and Adamson: Photographs from the J. Paul Getty Museum, (J. Paul Getty Museum Publications) [In Focus series] [Δ
  
Bell, Keith (ed.), 1987, Photographs of David Octavius Hill and Robert Adamson, (Saskatoon: Mendell Art Gallery) [Δ
  
Bruce, David, 1973, Sun Pictures: The Hill-Adamson Calotypes, (Greenwich, CT: New York Graphic Society) [Δ
  
Ford, Colin (ed.), 1976, An Early Victorian Album: The Photographic Masterpieces (1843-1847) of David Octavius Hill and Robert Adamson, (New York: Alfred A. Knopf) [Δ
  
Harley Jr, Ralph L., 1986, ‘The D. O. Hill and Robert Adamson Partnership‘, History of Photography, vol. 10, no. 4, pp. 303-312 [Δ
  
Nickel, Heinrich L., 1960, David Octavius Hill, (Halle: Fotokinoverl.) [Δ
  
Schwarz, Heinrich, 1932, David Octavius Hill: Master of Photography, (London: George C. Harrap) [Δ
  
Smith, Graham, 1983, ‘Calotype Views of St. Andrews' by David Octavius Hill and Robert Adamson‘, History of Photography, vol. 7, no. 3, pp. 207-236 [Δ
  
Stevenson, S., 1981, David Octavius Hill and Robert Adamson. Catalogue of their Calotypes taken between 1843 and 1847 in the Collection of the Scottish National Portrait Gallery, (Edinburgh: Scottish National Portrait Gallery) [Δ
  
Stevenson, Sara, 1990, Hill and Adamson's The Fishermen and Women of the Firth of Forth, (Edinburgh: National Galleries of Scotland) [Δ
  
Stevenson, Sara, 2002, The Personal Art of David Octavius Hill, (Yale University Press / Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art) isbn-13: 978-0300095340 [Δ
  
Ward, John & Stevenson, Sara, 1986, Printed Light. The Scientific Art of William Henry Fox Talbot and David Octavius Hill with Robert Adamson, (Edinburgh: Scottish National Portrait Gallery & Her Majesty’s Stationery Office) [Δ
  
Hill & Adamson 
  
1999, Hill and Adamson: Photographs from the J. Paul Getty Museum, (J. Paul Getty Museum Publications) [In Focus series] [Δ
  
Bell, Keith (ed.), 1987, Photographs of David Octavius Hill and Robert Adamson, (Saskatoon: Mendell Art Gallery) [Δ
  
Bruce, David, 1973, Sun Pictures: The Hill-Adamson Calotypes, (Greenwich, CT: New York Graphic Society) [Δ
  
Ford, Colin (ed.), 1976, An Early Victorian Album: The Photographic Masterpieces (1843-1847) of David Octavius Hill and Robert Adamson, (New York: Alfred A. Knopf) [Δ
  
Harley Jr, Ralph L., 1986, ‘The D. O. Hill and Robert Adamson Partnership‘, History of Photography, vol. 10, no. 4, pp. 303-312 [Δ
  
Nickel, Heinrich L., 1960, David Octavius Hill, (Halle: Fotokinoverl.) [Δ
  
Schwarz, Heinrich, 1932, David Octavius Hill: Master of Photography, (London: George C. Harrap) [Δ
  
Smith, Graham, 1983, ‘Calotype Views of St. Andrews' by David Octavius Hill and Robert Adamson‘, History of Photography, vol. 7, no. 3, pp. 207-236 [Δ
  
Stevenson, S., 1981, David Octavius Hill and Robert Adamson. Catalogue of their Calotypes taken between 1843 and 1847 in the Collection of the Scottish National Portrait Gallery, (Edinburgh: Scottish National Portrait Gallery) [Δ
  
Stevenson, Sara, 1990, Hill and Adamson's The Fishermen and Women of the Firth of Forth, (Edinburgh: National Galleries of Scotland) [Δ
  
Stevenson, Sara, 2002, The Personal Art of David Octavius Hill, (Yale University Press / Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art) isbn-13: 978-0300095340 [Δ
  
Ward, John & Stevenson, Sara, 1986, Printed Light. The Scientific Art of William Henry Fox Talbot and David Octavius Hill with Robert Adamson, (Edinburgh: Scottish National Portrait Gallery & Her Majesty’s Stationery Office) [Δ
  
Gustave Le Gray 
  
Aubenas, Sylvie et al., 2002, Gustave Le Gray, 1820–1884, (Los Angeles: J. Paul Getty Museum) [Δ
  
Barro, Lisa & Kennedy, Nora W., 2005, ‘Gustave Le Gray's Salted Paper Prints‘, in 2005, Pre-Prints of the 14th Triennial Meeting Amsterdam, ICOM Committee for Conservation, pp. 533–540 [Δ
  
Auguste Salzmann 
  
Salzmann, Auguste, 1856, Jérusalem. Etude et reproduction photographique des monuments de la Ville Sainte depuis l'époque judaïque jusqu'à nos jours par Auguste Salzmann, chargé par le Ministère de l'instruction publique d'une mission scientifique en Orient [Jerusalem: Photographs of the Monuments of the Holy City], (Paris: Gide et J. Baudry) [Δ
  
Henry Fox Talbot 
  
Brusius, Mirjam, 2009, ‘Inscriptions in a double sense: The biography of an early scientific photograph of script‘, Nuncius: Journal of the History of Science, vol. 24, no. 2, p. 367 [Δ
  
Caminos, Ricardo A., 1966, ‘The Talbotype Applied to Hieroglyphics‘, Journal of Egyptian Archaeology, vol. 52, pp. 65-70 [See also: plates XIII-XV] [Δ
  
Talbot, Henry Fox, 1846, The Talbotype Applied to Hieroglyphics, (Reading: Privately printed) [Nicolaas Henneman produced the prints. The work included three photographs with accompanying text.] [Δ
  
Talbot, William Henry Fox, 1845, Sun Pictures in Scotland, (London) [Δ
  
Talbot, William Henry Fox, 1989, The Pencil of Nature, (New York: Hans P. Kraus) [Facsimile edition] [Δ
  
Ward, John & Stevenson, Sara, 1986, Printed Light. The Scientific Art of William Henry Fox Talbot and David Octavius Hill with Robert Adamson, (Edinburgh: Scottish National Portrait Gallery & Her Majesty’s Stationery Office) [Δ
  
 
  
If you feel this list is missing a significant book or article please let me know - Alan - alan@luminous-lint.com 
  
 
  
Resources 
  
Salted-paper prints: Richard Benson - The Printed Page - The Museum of Modern Art 
http://www.benson.readandnote.com ... 
  
Graphics Atlas - Image Permanence Institute 
http://www.graphicsatlas.org 
Graphics Atlas is a sophisticated resource that presents a unique, object-based approach for the identification and characterization of prints and photographs. 
  
 
  

HomeContentsPhotographers > Photographers worth investigating

 
Édouard Baldus  (1813-1889) • Louis-Désiré Blanquart-Evrard  (1802-1872) • Giacomo Caneva  (1813-1865) • Eugène Constant  (check) • Vittorio della Rovere • Maxime Du Camp  (1822-1894) • Claude-Marie Ferrier  (1811-1889) • Frederick Fiebig • Comte Frédéric Flachéron  (1813-1883) • Jean-Baptiste Frenet  (1814-1889) • Georg Jacob Gattineau • David Octavius Hill  (1802-1870) • Hill & Adamson • Silas A. Holmes  (1820-1886) • Calvert Richard Jones  (1804-1877) • Gustave Le Gray  (1820-1884) • Henri Le Secq  (1818-1882) • John McCosh  (check) • Luigi Pesce •  Aimé Rochas • Nevil Story-Maskelyne  (1823-1911) • Henry Fox Talbot  (1800-1877) • Félix Teynard  (1817-1892) • Jean Walther  (1806-1866)
HomeTechniquesProcess and product > Salt prints 
A wider gazeRelated topics 
  
Calotypes 
Imprimerie photographique Blanquart-Evrard 
 
  

HomeContentsOnline exhibitions > Salt prints

Please submit suggestions for Online Exhibitions that will enhance this theme.
Alan - alan@luminous-lint.com

 
  
ThumbnailSalt paper prints - Exterior views (1839-1855) 
Title | Lightbox | Checklist
Released (October 24, 2010) A preliminary reference set.
 
Currently seeking higher quality scans and further examples.
ThumbnailSalt prints 
Title | Lightbox | Checklist
Released (July 15, 2006)
 
  

HomeVisual indexes > Salt prints

Please submit suggestions for Visual Indexes to enhance this theme.
Alan - alan@luminous-lint.com

 
  
   Photographer 
  
ThumbnailAuguste Salzmann: Jerusalem 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailCharle Johan Bergamasco: Hand-coloured Russian portraits on salted paper prints 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailGeorg Jacob Gattineau: German fencing students (1861) 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailGustave de Beaucorps: Le Pont Saint-Ange, Rome (ca. 1859) 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailHill & Adamson: Edinburgh Castle 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailHill & Adamson: James Linton at Newhaven 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailHill & Adamson: Newhaven 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailJames Robertson: Painted salt prints 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailJohn Nicolas Laverty: Hand-coloured salt prints (adjusted) 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailPompeo Bondini: Italy 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailSilas A. Holmes (attributed): New York ca. 1855) 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
 
 
  
   Techniques 
  
ThumbnailSalt prints: Painted 
ThumbnailSalt prints: Themes: Erotica 
ThumbnailSalt prints: Themes: Exteriors 
ThumbnailSalt prints: Themes: Military 
ThumbnailSalt prints: Themes: Objects 
ThumbnailSalt prints: Themes: Occupationals 
ThumbnailSalt prints: Themes: Photographica 
ThumbnailSalt prints: Themes: Photomontage 
ThumbnailSalt prints: Themes: Places 
ThumbnailSalt prints: Themes: Portraits 
ThumbnailSalt prints: Themes: Post-mortem 
ThumbnailSalt prints: Themes: Sports and pastimes 
ThumbnailSalt prints: Themes: Still life 
 
 
  
   Still thinking about these... 
  
ThumbnailExhibition of the Works of Industry of All Nations, 1851 (1852) 
ThumbnailSalt prints: Backgrounds 
 
  
Refreshed: 20 December 2014, 23:00
 
  
 
  
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