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HomeContentsThemes > Photographing art - sculpture

Contents

Examples
541.01   Photographing art: Sculpture
Photographers
541.02   Adolph Schaefer: The Buddhist monument at Borobudur in Central Java, Indonesia (1844-1845)
541.03   Henry Fox Talbot: Bust of Patroclus
541.04   Roger Fenton: The British Museum
541.05   HMS Topaze and Easter Island, Chile (1868)
541.06   Alinari: The statues of Florence
541.07   Alois Löcherer: The statue of Bavaria, Munich (1844-1850)
541.08   Édouard Baldus: The Louvre, Paris (1856-1857)
541.09   Robert Macpherson: The statues of Rome
541.10   Délié & Béchard: Album du Musée Boulaq
541.11   Edward Steichen: Rodin's statue of Balzac (1908)
Using photography as an aid to sculpture
541.12   François Willème: Photosculpture
541.13   Henry Rox: Photosculptures
World's Fairs and International Exhibitions
541.14   Vienna, Weltausstellung, 1873 Wien: Statuary
Tableaux vivant
541.15   Josef Jindrich Šechtl and Ignác Šechtl: Living statues
Natural sculptures / Environment art
541.16   Andy Goldsworthy: Books
541.17   Richard Long: On-site sculptures
541.18   Robert Smithson: On-site sculptures
This theme includes example sections and will be revised and added to as we proceed. Suggestions for additions, improvements and the correction of factual errors are always appreciated. 
  
Status: Collect > Document > Analyse > Improve
 
  
Examples 
  
541.01   Art >  Photographing art: Sculpture 
  
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Photographers 
  
541.02   Art >  Adolph Schaefer: The Buddhist monument at Borobudur in Central Java, Indonesia (1844-1845) 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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In the collections at the Universiteit Leiden, Prentenkabinet there are a number of daguerreotypes taken between 1844 and 1845 by Adolph Schaefer of the sculptures at the Mahayana Buddhist monument at Borobudur in Central Java, Indonesia.[1]
 
Like Joseph-Philibert Girault de Prangey documenting the monuments of the Classical and Ancient world[2] the work of Schaefer is an early example of using daguerreotypes as an aid to archaeological research. In America Thomas Easterly[3] used daguerreotypes to document The Destruction of Big Mound (1853-1854) St. Louis showing how surviving photographs could record the destruction of cultural sites.
 
In 1873-1874 Isidore van Kinsbergen was commissioned by the Batavian Society for Arts and Sciences to document the ruins at Borobudur.[4] 
  
541.03   Art >  Henry Fox Talbot: Bust of Patroclus 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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H. Fox Talbot, The Pencil of Nature, (London: Longman, Brown, Green and Longmans, 1844)
Statues, busts, and other specimens of sculpture, are generally well represented by the Photographic Art; and also very rapidly, in consequence of their whiteness.
 
These delineations are susceptible of an almost unlimited variety: since in the first place, a statue may be placed in any position with regard to the sun, either directly opposite to it, or at any angle: the directness or obliquity of the illumination causing of course an immense difference in the effect. And when a choice has been made of the direction in which the sun's rays shall fall, the statue may be then turned round on its pedestal, which produces a second set of variations no less considerable than the first. And when to this is added the change of size which is produced in the image by bringing the Camera Obscura nearer to the statue or removing it further off, it becomes evident how very great a number of different effects may be obtained from a single specimen of sculpture.
 
With regard to many statues, however, a better effect is obtained by delineating them in cloudy weather than in sunshine. For, the sunshine causes such strong shadows as sometimes to confuse the subject. To prevent this, it is a good plan to hold a white cloth on one side of the statue at a little distance to reflect back the sun's rays and cause a faint illumination of the parts which would otherwise be lost in shadow.
 
  
541.04   Art >  Roger Fenton: The British Museum 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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   Roger  Fenton Museums 
View exhibition 
Title | Lightbox | Checklist
 
  
541.05   Art >  HMS Topaze and Easter Island, Chile (1868) 
  
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The moai or stone statues of Easter Islands (Rapu Nui) in Polynesia were known to Western expeditions through the oil painting of William Hodges who was the artist on Captain Cook's visit to the island on a survey mission in 1774.
 
In 1868 the English ship HMS Topaze commanded by Richard Ashmore Powell collected the four ton statue Hoa Hakananai'a (thought to mean 'stolen or hidden friend') and took it out on a raft to the ship. In Valparaiso in Chile Paul-Émile Miot photographed the statue on the deck of HMS Topaze enroute to Great Britain where it is now in the British Museum.[5][6] 
  
541.06   Art >  Alinari: The statues of Florence 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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541.07   Art >  Alois Löcherer: The statue of Bavaria, Munich (1844-1850) 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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Alois Löcherer took a series of photographs of the construction, transportation and assembly of the vast statue statue of Bavaria which took place between 1844 and 1850.[7] The bronze statue, which was commissioned by Ludwig I of Bavaria, was cast at the Munich foundry of J.B. Stiglmair between 1844 and 1850. The extended period over which photographs were taken make this series by Löcherer one of the earliest examples of documentary photography of a civil engineering project. 
  
541.08   Art >  Édouard Baldus: The Louvre, Paris (1856-1857) 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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Édouard Baldus documented the construction of The Louve in Paris (1856-1857) and series of six large folios of 538 salt prints was created. The folios may have been a mock-up or "pre-selection" of images used in the final edition of 25 folios of salt prints presented to royalty and national libraries in France and Europe. [8] 
  
541.09   Art >  Robert Macpherson: The statues of Rome 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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541.10   Art >  Délié & Béchard: Album du Musée Boulaq 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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541.11   Art >  Edward Steichen: Rodin's statue of Balzac (1908) 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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Rodin (1840-1917) had been commissioned by The Société des Gens de Lettres to prepare a sculpture of the French author Balzac (1799-1850) and when he first exhibited it the work was not accepted as it failed to depict a recognizable likeness of the author. This created a considerable scandal in the press. Although it was initially rejected public interest in the monument grew and in 1908 Rodin contacted three people Jacques-Ernest Bulloz, Jean Limet and his friend Edward Steichen, who was almost 40 years younger than Rodin, about photographing the sculpture. Edward Steichen photographed the sculpture with the soft-muted tones of Pictorialism to create a sombre and reflective mood - a heroic silouette. Here there is minimal detail just as the scuplture itself is an impression of Balzac rather than a real person.[9] 
  
Using photography as an aid to sculpture 
  
541.12   Art >  François Willème: Photosculpture 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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French sculptor François Willème (1830-1905) used and patented a system of his own invention for taking multiple simultaneous photographs of three-dimensional objects or people from different standardized distances around the subject. Alden Scott Boyer acquired a number of photographs that were based on the work of François Willème and photohistorian Beaumont Newhall described in a 1958 article how he had worked in his studio in the nineteenth century:
Inside, a silver plumb bob hung from the very center of the skylight. Directly beneath it was a raised circular platform with numbers 1 to 24 printed on it. The walls of the gallery were carved with carved pilasters into twenty-four panels, in the centers of which were handsome statues, supported on carved brackets or consoles. Not a camera was in sight.
 
The sitter was posed on the dais, with his head directly beneath the plumb bob. He was instructed to hold the pose for ten seconds - and that was all there was to having one's photosculpture taken. Compared with the hours upon hours of tiresome sitting for the orthodox sculptor, the new invention promised to be a great success.
 
Unseen by the sitter, twenty-four pictures of him had been taken by twenty-four miniature cameras, cleverly hidden inside the consoles. Each camera had a shutter, and these were synchronized by a system of cords controlled by an operator. The photographs which resulted were only a means to an end, and themselves possessed no artistic quality. As Boyer pointed out, all the paraphernalia and clutter of the studio was recorded - headrests and all. But the set of negatives contained sufficient information to enable François Willème to make a statue with a minimum of skill of hand and effort.
 
The second operation was to make lantern slides from the negatives.
 
The workroom where the photographs were transformed into three-dimensional sculptures presented as unusual an appearance as the studio. A battery of lantern slide projectors stood in a line, their lenses focused on translucent screens approximately six fee high. Beside each screen was a stout workbench on which there was a revolving platform divided exactly like the posing dais into twenty-four numbered sections. Modeling clay was piled on this platform and roughly shaped by hand into the size and form of the final statue.
 
The next step was to transfer the outline thrown on the screen by the magic lantern to the clay. This Willème did by means of a pantograph, adapted from the draftsman's instrument for reducing drawings. Four levers are so joined together in a parallelogram shape that the movement of the end of one lever is exactly reproduced by the other end but in reduced degree. Willème fastened a modeling tool at one end of his pantograph, which was arranged vertically, and a stylus at the other. As he traced the outline of the projected photograph, the modeling tool bit into the clay. After tracing the outline, Willème next traced the secondary features - eyes, nose, mouth.
 
Now a second slide was put into the projector. The translucent screen, which could be adjusted vertically and horizontally, was moved until a mark in the center was exactly opposite the plumb bob. The revolving platform holding the clay was turned to correspond to the number of the photograph, and the process was repeated.
 
After the twenty-four photographs had been traced, the result was a statue, which simply needed to be smoothed off before being cast into a more permanent form.[10]
François Willème patented his invention in the United States[11] and it was used to create sculptures of Admiral Farragut and Ulysses S. Grant
  
541.13   Art >  Henry Rox: Photosculptures 
  
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World's Fairs and International Exhibitions 
  
541.14   Art >  Vienna, Weltausstellung, 1873 Wien: Statuary 
  
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Tableaux vivant 
  
541.15   Art >  Josef Jindrich Šechtl and Ignác Šechtl: Living statues 
  
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Natural sculptures / Environment art 
  
541.16   Art >  Andy Goldsworthy: Books 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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To gain an alternative perspective on the natural world examine the books of the Scottish sculptor Andy Goldsworthy who uses leaves, petals, stones and ice to construct transient creations of outstanding beauty and he preserves these short-lived masterpieces photographically.[12] In a 2007 interview in The Observer gave a context:
Goldsworthy is a land artist in the tradition of the great American earth-movers like Robert Smithson who created Spiral Jetty at Salt Lake, Utah. Richard Long, who imported that tradition to Britain, is another mentor; like them, he wants to get away from two-dimensional representation of landscape in a frame, and give you the thing itself. That's the theory. But he is also strongly in the tradition of everyone who has ever had memorable days making dens in parks or sandcastles on beaches. He preserves such ephemeral creations, icicle statues on rocks, brilliant forest dramas made with autumn leaves, in exquisite photographs.[13]
 
  
541.17   Art >  Richard Long: On-site sculptures 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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541.18   Art >  Robert Smithson: On-site sculptures 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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Footnotes 
  
  1. Λ Herman Moeshart, 1985, July-September, ‘Daguerreotypes by Adolph Schaefer‘, History of Photography, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 211-218 
      
  2. Λ Joseph-Philibert Girault de Prangey's daguerreotypes are included in - 1998, Girault de Prangey (1804-1892): dessins, peintures, photographies, études historiques, (Langres: Musées de Langres / D. Guéniot) [Exhibition catalogue] 
      
  3. Λ Delores A. Kilgo, 1994, Likeness and Landscape: Thomas M. Easterly and the Art of the Daguerreotype, (University of New Mexico Press) 
      
  4. Λ Pauline Lunsingh Scheurleer, "Isidore van Kinsbergen, Photographer of Javanese Antiquities", in Jane Levy Reed (ed.), 1991, Toward Independence, A Century of Indonesia Photographed, (San Francisco: Friends of Photography), pp. 36-43 
      
  5. Λ British Museum - Hoa Hakananai'a From Orongo, Easter Island (Rapa Nui), Polynesia, around AD 1000
    (Accessed: 4 April 2013)
    www.britishmuseum.org/explore/highlights/highlight_objects/aoa/h/hoa_hakananaia.aspx 
      
  6. Λ For the study of archaeological remains on Easter Island - The Easter Island Statue Project
    (Accessed: 5 May 2014)
    www.eisp.org 
      
  7. Λ Alois Löcherer, 1998, Alois Löcherer. Photographien 1845 - 1855, (Schirmer /Mosel Verlag Gm) 
      
  8. Λ pers. email (1 July 2013) Robert G. Hill to Alan Griffiths. A set of the six folios is in the Private Collection of Robert G. Hill, Toronto, Canada. 
      
  9. Λ Rodin and Steichen - Musée Rodin
    (Accessed: 5 November 2013)
    www.musee-rodin.fr/en/rodin/educational-files/rodin-and-steichen 
      
  10. Λ Beaumont Newhall, May 1958, "Photosculpture", Image: Journal of Photography and Motion Pictures of the George Eastman House, no. 61, pp. 100-105 
      
  11. Λ 9 August 1864, "F. Willeme: Photographing Sculpture", U. S. Patent No. 43,822, 
      
  12. Λ For a selection of books on the Land art of Andy Goldsworthy - Andy Goldsworthy, 1990, A Collaboration with Nature, (Abrams); Andy Goldsworthy, 1996, Wood, (Harry N. Abrams); Andy Goldsworthy, 2004, Hand to Earth, (Harry N. Abrams), Andy Goldsworthy, 2011, Stone, (Thames & Hudson) 
      
  13. Λ Tim Adams, 11 March 2007, "Interview: Andy Goldsworthy - Natural Talent", The Observer (UK)
    (Accessed: 17 August 2013)
    www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2007/mar/11/art.features3 
      

alan@luminous-lint.com

 
  

HomeContents > Further research

 
  
General reading 
  
Claudet, A., 1864, 15 October, ‘Photosculpture‘, The Journal of the Photographic Society of London, no. 150, pp. 121-124 [Δ
  
Dezeuze, Anna & Kelly, Julia (eds.), 2013, Found Sculpture and Photography from Surrealism to Contemporary Art, (Ashgate) isbn-13: 978-1409400004 [Δ
  
Elsen, A.E., 1980, In Rodin's Studio: A Photographic Record of Sculpture in the Making, (Oxford) [Δ
  
Fehlmann, Marc, 2006, ‘Under the light of Helion: early photography and the Parthenon sculptures‘, Sculpture Journal, vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 161-172 [Δ
  
Galerie Daniel Blau [firm], 2008, Gegossenes Licht / Cast Light, (Munich: Galerie Daniel Blau) isbn-13: 978-3000240454 [500 copies] [Δ
  
Gall, Jean-Luc, 1997, November, ‘Photo/sculpture L'invention de François Willème‘, Revue études photographiques, no. 3 [Δ
  
Janis, Eugenia Parry, 1991, The Kiss of Apollo, Photography & sculpture, 1845 to the present, (San Francisco: Fraenkel Gallery) isbn-10: 0938491660 isbn-13: 978-0938491668 [Δ
  
Kenworthy-Browne, John, 2006, ‘Plaster casts for the Crystal Palace, Sydenham‘, Sculpture Journal, vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 173-198 [Δ
  
Marcoci, Roxana, 2010, The Original Copy: Photography of Sculpture, 1839 to Today, (New York: The Museum of Modern Art) isbn-10: 0870707574 isbn-13: 978-0870707575 [Contributors : Geoffrey Batchen, Tobia Bezzola] [Δ
  
Newhall, Beaumont, 1958, May, ‘Photosculpture‘, Image: Journal of Photography and Motion Pictures of the George Eastman House, no. 61, pp. 100-105 [http://image.eastmanhouse.org/files/GEH_1958_07_05.pdf] [Δ
  
Sobieszek, Robert A., 1980, ‘Sculpture as the Sum of Its Profiles: François Willème and Photosculpture in France, 1859-1868‘, The Art Bulletin, vol. 62, no. 4, pp. 617-630 [Δ
  
 
  
Readings on, or by, individual photographers 
  
Alois Löcherer 
  
Löcherer, Alois, 1998, Alois Löcherer. Photographien 1845 - 1855, (Schirmer /Mosel Verlag Gm) [Δ
  
Robert Macpherson 
  
Macpherson, Robert, 1863, Vatican Sculptures, Selected and Arranged in the Order in which they are Found in the Galleries, (London: Chapman & Hall) [Δ
  
 
  
If you feel this list is missing a significant book or article please let me know - Alan - alan@luminous-lint.com 
  

HomeContentsPhotographers > Photographers worth investigating

 
Alinari • Alphonse Bernoud  (1820-1889) • Adolphe Braun  (1812-1877) • Braun Clément & Cie • François-Rupert Carabin  (1862-1932) • Mario Carrieri • Roger Fenton  (1819-1869) • Anton Hautmann  (1821-1862) • Alois Löcherer  (1815-1862) • Budtz Müller  (1837-1884) • Adolph Schaefer • François Willème  (1830-1905)
HomeThemesArt > Photographing art - sculpture 
 
A wider gazeRelated topics 
  
Photographing art - paintings and drawings 
Still life 
 
  

HomeContentsOnline exhibitions > Photographing art - sculpture

Please submit suggestions for Online Exhibitions that will enhance this theme.
Alan - alan@luminous-lint.com

 
  
ThumbnailPhotographic reproductions of sculpture 
Title | Lightbox | Checklist
Released (January 22, 2012)
ThumbnailRoger Fenton - Museums 
Title | Lightbox | Checklist
Released (November 20, 2010)
 
  

HomeVisual indexes > Photographing art - sculpture

Please submit suggestions for Visual Indexes to enhance this theme.
Alan - alan@luminous-lint.com

 
  
   Photographer 
  
ThumbnailAdolph Schaefer: Borobudur 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailAlbert Fernique: Album de la construction de la Statue de la Liberté 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailAlinari: Italy: Florence: Statues 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailAlois Löcherer: The statue of Bavaria, Munich (1844-1850) 
ThumbnailBudtz Muller: Les Oeuvres de Thorvaldsen 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailCharles Bierstadt: Bartholdi Statue of Liberty, New York Harbor 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailCharles Nègre: Plaster casts 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailDmitri Constantine: Sculpture 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailEdward Steichen: Balzac 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailFrançois Willème: Photosculpture 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailHenry Fox Talbot: Bust of Patroclus 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailHenry Fox Talbot: Diogenes 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailHenry Rox: Photosculptures 
ThumbnailLinnaeus Tripe: The Elliot Marbles 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailLouis-Rémy Robert: Doorway to Sèvres Factory 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailLouis-Rémy Robert: Sèvres ceramics 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailRobert Macpherson: Sculpture 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailSouthworth & Hawes: Sculptures 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
 
  
   Connections 
  
ThumbnailHenri Le Secq - Bisson frères - Charles Marville - Charles Nègre 
 
 
  
   Themes 
  
ThumbnailArt: Photographing sculpture 
ThumbnailArt: Sculpture: The "Laocoonte" in the Vatican Museums 
ThumbnailArt: Sculpture: The "Statue of Horses and Chariot" in the Vatican Museums 
ThumbnailScientific: Archaeology: The Rosetta Stone 
ThumbnailStatues, sculptures and busts of photographers 
 
 
  
   Still thinking about these... 
  
ThumbnailVienna, Weltausstellung, 1873 Wien: Statuary 
 
 
  
Refreshed: 18 August 2014, 09:00
 
  
 
  
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