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Curatorial and planning notes 
  
Details on individual tourist sites such as the Colosseum, the Acropolis, the Pyramids and many others are included in the "Geographical regions" section. I'd like to extend this section with information related to the tours of Thomas Cook, railroad excursions, early family travel albums and the diaries of photographers as they toured the world. If you have examples I'd be grateful if you'd let me know.
 
  
Contents

The growing popularity of travel
507.01   Photographers on the Grand Tour
507.02   Thomas Cook
507.03   Travel in popular culture
507.04   Travellers
507.05   The travels of Grand Duke Alexei Alexandrovich of Russia (1871-1872)
Hotels
507.06   Egypt: Shepheard's Hotel / Hotel Shepherd
Travel photographers at work
507.07   Carleton Watkins: #925 Spring Valley Water Works
Documenting the world
507.08   Albert Kahn: Archives of the Planet (1909-1931)
Photographic souvenirs
507.09   Photographs for the growing number of travelers
507.10   Auguste Lesouëf - Pompeii (1880)
507.11   Marketing: Commercial catalogues
507.12   Nineteenth century book and print sellers
507.13   Karl Baedeker's Handbooks for Travellers
507.14   Souvenir photograph albums
507.15   Souvenir sets of travel photographs
507.16   Paperweight travel souvenirs
Reminiscences and the armchair traveler
507.17   Théophile Gautier: Wanderings in Spain (1853)
507.18   Mr. E. K. Tenison, of Kilbonan Castle, exhibited a number of photographs of very large size, representing views in Spain (1853)
Books and portfolios of prints based on, or purportedly based on, photographs
507.19   Paris et ses Environs Reproduits par le Daguerrotype, Sous la Direction de M. Ch. Philipon (Paris: Chez Aubert et Cie, 1840)
507.20   Noël Marie Paymal Lerebours: Excursions daguerriennes : vues et monuments les plus remarquables du globe
507.21   Adolphe Duperly: Daguerian Excursions in Jamaica (1840)
507.22   Bruges, ses Monuments et ses Tableaux, edited by Daveluy (Bruges, Daveluy, 1855)
Travel books
507.23   Roger Fenton: The Conway in the Stereoscope (1860)
507.24   William Despard Hemphill: The Abbeys, Castles, and Scenery of Clonmel and the Surrounding Countryside (1860)
507.25   Louis de Clercq: Voyage en Orient (1860)
507.26   Francis Bedford: The Prince of Wales and his trip to the East (1862)
507.27   Francis Bedford: The Prince of Wales and his trip to the East - Covers (1863)
507.28   Edward Bierstadt: Gems of American Scenery, consisting of Stereocopic Views among the White Mountains (1878)
507.29   J. Payne Jennings: Book covers
507.30   Photographically illustrated books for the armchair traveler
Stereo sets
507.31   Stereoview libraries for the armchair traveler
Travel clichés of the nineteenth century
507.32   Egypt: Climbing the Pyramids
Travel literature
507.33   Jules Verne: Around the World in Eighty Days - What would Phileas Fogg and Passepartout have seen in 1872?
507.34   Francis Frith: Illustrations for Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's Hyperion (1865)
507.35   Mark Twain attempting to photograph the Matterhorn (1880)
Albums and diaries
507.36   Albums and travel diaries created by travelers
507.37   Luis Pastorino: Fotografias de Montevideo (1880)
507.38   Enrico Van Lint: Ricordo di Pisa (ca 1875-1880)
507.39   Frank Jay Haynes: Alaska Views (ca. 1891)
507.40   Album of cyanotypes of Florence, Italy (1880s or later)
507.41   Clara Whitcomb`s diary: Egypt and the Levant (1898-1899)
507.42   Photograph album - An Unknown Street Photographer in Paris (1896)
507.43   G.K. Ballance: Travel in Switzerland and Italy (1900-1910)
507.44   Charles Breed: The Wellcome Photographic Exposure Record and Diary - 1910 - French trip
Autochromes and early colour travel photography
507.45   Autochromes: From around the world
507.46   Fernand Cuville: Greece: Mount Athos
This theme includes example sections and will be revised and added to as we proceed. Suggestions for additions, improvements and the correction of factual errors are always appreciated. 
  
Status: Collect > Document > Analyse > Improve
 
  
The growing popularity of travel 
  
507.01   Travel >  Photographers on the Grand Tour 
  
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A number of early photographers in the mid-1850's onwards were interested in the commercial possibilities of taking images in exotic locations and then selling the resulting images in the developing European markets. When leaving their own countries the photographers gravitated towards the locations popularized by the 'Grand Tour' to Italy sometimes extening their travels to Greece, Turkey, Egypt and the sites of the Holy Land.
  • Joseph-Philibert Girault de Prangey (1804-1892) with his Daguerreotypes of monuments in Rome and Athens taken in 1842.[1]  
      
    Joseph-Philibert Girault de Prangey: Italy and Greece (1842) 
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  • John Ruskin (1819-1900)[2] was a highly influential British art critic, writer, social reformer, artist, outstanding watercolourist and occasional amateur photographer who took daguerreotypes at various locations including Feiburg, Venice, Lucca and Pisa. His works included illustrations based on daguerreotypes.  
      
    John Ruskin: Daguerreotypes and illustrations 
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  • William J. Stillman (1828-1901) traveled through Europe with the British art critic John Ruskin to the Alps and took photographs of classical sites, most notably the Acropolis (1869).[3]  
      
    William J. Stillman: The Acropolis, Athens 
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There were a great many other photographers who went to the classical sites and recorded them either as amateurs or for publication in albums. Some names worthy of further investigation include Rev. George Bridges[4], Francis Bedford[5], Eugene Piot, and the Reverend Calvert Richard Jones with his photographs of the Roman colosseum.
 
There were also resident foreign photographers in different centers such as Robert Macpherson[6] and James Anderson[7] in Rome. In Naples Giorgio Sommer (1834-1914)[8] provided views of the ruins of Pompeii, the city of Naples and stereotypical genre photographs of people eating spaghetti, drinking wine and pickpockets. In Venice Carlo Naya and Carlo Ponti photographs of the canals and local colour. James Robertson[9] photographed in Constantinople, the capital of the Ottoman Empire, selling photographs to travellers.
 
There were also local photographers in major communities for example in Greece the first Greek photographer Philippos Margaritis but there were others including Dmitri Constantine and Petros Moraites. Each country and region has this blend of foreign travellers, foreign residents and local photographers and gradually more thorough histories are appearing on each of these. 
  
507.02   Travel >  Thomas Cook 
  
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From his early beginnings arranging an 1841 temperance outing by rail in England British entrepeneur Thomas Cook (1808-1892)[10] went on to become a major force in how travel was managed for the masses. He set in place the structure for planned excursions and quickly became a significant operator and claimed he took 165,000 people to the Great Exhibition in London.[11] His tours removed barriers to foreign travel by handling the transport, accomodation and food and over time redeemable coupons were created for hotels. The Cook's Continental Time Tables & Tourist's Handbooks were essential companions for the adventurous traveller and Cook's Offices and Agents were in many cities to ease the concerns of the neophtye traveller.  
  
Signs for Thomas Cook by the Jaffa Gate, Jerusalem 
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The important detail here is that the rise of travel companies such as Thomas Cook's went along with the expansion of the railway networks and increasing maritime passenger traffic and was closely linked to the rise of the European Empires. Improved transportation networks encouraged business opportunities and just as Thomas Cook could manage the travel so Karl Baedeker's Handbooks for Travellers inform one about what to see. These developments coincided with the rise of photography and amateur photographers could visit major sites and for those without a camera there was a developing market for professional photographers selling photographs of the key sites mentioned by Baedeker - it was a perfect combination of forces. 
  
507.03   Travel >  Travel in popular culture 
  
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In the nineteenth century the growth of railway mileage worldwide was phenomenal as they strove to keep up with the pent up demand for faster and more commodious forms of travel than horse drawn carriages. The popular imagination was filled with magazine illustrations of trains,[12] increasing speed and timetables to accurately plan travel. In the United States railroad mileage grew from a total of 9,020 miles in 1850 to 52,920 miles in 1871[13] between 1871 and 1880 during a peak period of railway building in the US over 4,000 miles a year were being laid down.[14] An almost random selection of railway stations shows that this was a worldwide phenomena - Baltiysky Rail Terminal in St Petersburg (1857), Victoria Station in London (1860), Stuttgart (1868), Yokohama (1872) and Dearborn / Polk St. in Chicago (1883). Many thousands of railway stations were build in the nineteenth century.[15]
 
As trade expanded along with colonial empires so the need for shipping lines carrying the salesmen, merchants, beaurocrats, military officers and missionaries to support the imperial designs. Berths for those who travelled for "travel's sake" or adventure expanded along with the guidebooks and maps to support them. The aspirations to travel increased as photographs were tipped-in[16] to expensive travel books or used as the basis for woodcuts, engraving and lithographs in books, magazines or as single prints. Stereoviews were a popular craze during the nineteenth century and included photographs of tourist locations around the world.[17] 
  
507.04   Travel >  Travellers 
  
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Nineteenth century photography has preserved travellers as they viewed the wonders of the world. We can see the great showman P.T. Barnum in Yosemite on a stereocard and see the result when artist Pierre Bonnard (1867-1947) took a snapshot of his fellow painters Ker-Xavier Roussel and Edouard Vuillard when they visited Venice in 1899.[18] 
  
507.05   Travel >  The travels of Grand Duke Alexei Alexandrovich of Russia (1871-1872) 
  
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Grand Duke Alexei Alexandrovich of Russia (1850-1908) was the fifth child of Tzar Alexander II and had a memorable naval career and was instrumental the modernisation of the Russian navy. He served as a lieutenant aboard the Svetlana during the 1871 voyage to the United States, a brief trip to Canada, Cuba, Brazil, Cape Town (South Africa), Batavia (Indonesia), Singapore, Hong Kong, China and Japan.[19] This adventurous voyage included a buffalo hunt and was widely reported in the press and photographs were taken by local photographers as the royal visit progressed.[20] 
  
Hotels 
  
507.06   Travel >  Egypt: Shepheard's Hotel / Hotel Shepherd 
  
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With the expansion of travel both for commerce and leisure so the need for a better class of hotels arose with opulence, grandeur and cuisine suited to the affluent. Shepheard's Hotel (renamed in 1860)[21] in Cairo in Egypt was a famous example as was Raffles Hotel (1887) in Singapore and the Ritz in London (1906). 
  
Travel photographers at work 
  
507.07   Travel >  Carleton Watkins: #925 Spring Valley Water Works 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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The following comments by Will Dunniway and Robert Szabo, two contemporary wet-plate collodion photographers, explain the significance of this rare yellow-mount stereoview "#925 Spring Valley Water Works" by Carleton E. Watkins:
 
The items inside the tent:
  1. The spigot for his water supply. It is not possible to see what the container was made of, but most likely it would have been copper or brass for weight considerations.
     
  2. Three of the four visible bottles appear to be leather wrapped. This is to prevent the glass from breaking from a rough wagon ride between shoots.
     
  3. There is an open wooden box and it is uncertain what it would have been used for. It was most likely to have been used for transporting chemicals and photographic paraphernalia.
The items outside the tent:
  1. As can be seen here Carleton Watkins used a vertical bath to process his mammoth plates. It has been suggested that he used a tray as his bath to sensitize his plates but this is conclusive. There is a further point about this bath tank. He is said to have NOT used a glass liner to contain his bath. Instead it was believed he asphalt painted the inside, or something along this line. In this image, it appears that there is not a glass liner. To seal this bath for traveling, usually the glass tank will extend above the wooden rim.
     
  2. A mammoth plate storage box.
     
  3. These boxes appear to be the 5x8 inch plate storage boxes for making stereo images. They are about the right size for two rows of plates, with a divider in the middle. They are on top the large mammoth plate boxes not being used at this moment of exposure, thus, these 5x8 plate boxes are sequentially in order.
     
  4. A glass plate cleaning vise.
     
  5. The lid clamp to a silver bath tank. The metal clamp with thumb screws was used for the sealing off this bath tank when traveling. The wooden lid for this huge mammoth plate silver bath tank appears to be with this clamp.
The tent itself:
 
The dark tent is lined with what I think is yellow, or a very warm colored material. As you know, collodion is a blue sensitive emulsion (it is called 'Ordinary'). This being what this is, the blue will NOT be seen, where as the yellow (red or warm tones) would be seen as dark. The outer material seems to be plain white canvas duck. The white outer shell is so the interior of this dark tent would not heat up in direct sun. This color choice was a must on warm days. After about 90oF outside, the inside of the tent would elevate the silver bath to above 80o F in no time at all. At this temperature, silver bath starts to act up, and will produce flawed plates.
 
It is not certain that the person on the left is Carleton E. Watkins and this remains to be confirmed. 
  
   Carleton Eugene  Watkins Spring Valley Water Works 
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Documenting the world 
  
507.08   Travel >  Albert Kahn: Archives of the Planet (1909-1931) 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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Albert Kahn (1860-1940)[22] was a banker rather than a photographer but his role in using colour photography[23] and film to document the planet left a profound legacy. Following a visit to Japan with his chauffeur and photographer, Alfred Dutertre, in 1909 he funded a project using a variety of photographers[24] to document over 50 countries between 1909 and 1931 creating an archive of 72,000 colour photographs and 183,000 meters of film.[25] 
  
Photographic souvenirs 
  
507.09   Travel >  Photographs for the growing number of travelers 
  
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As the number of tourists expanded with improved transportation, particularly railways, during the nineteenth century the market opportunity of selling photographs to them grew. This market was addressed by local photographers providing prints or albums either directly from their studios or through intermediaries such as booksellers and print sellers. Some photographers published extentive catalogues of the photographs they had available for purchase.
 
Examples of photographers servicing the tourist market include:  
  
507.10   Travel >  Auguste Lesouëf - Pompeii (1880) 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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These four hand colored photographs from an album of twelve are by Auguste Lesouëf (1829-1906).[31] They were produced as souvenirs for the many tourists who visited the excavations.
 
The Roman city of Pompeii was covered by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 A.D but in the nineteenth century Fausto and Felice Niccolini were documenting the extensive archaeological excavations and published the results in their four volume work Le case ed i monumenti di Pompei disegnati e descritti that was published between 1854 and 1897. 
  
507.11   Travel >  Marketing: Commercial catalogues 
  
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To improve access to the large numbers of photographs available photographers had lists printed[32] for distribution and others had illustrated catalogues or photomontages of their images.[33] 
  
   19thc Studio Marketing 
View exhibition 
Title | Lightbox | Checklist
 
  
507.12   Travel >  Nineteenth century book and print sellers 
  
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Large cities in the nineteenth century had bookshops and shops selling prints and photographs. This was an essential part of the marketing chain and presumably they purchased material at a wholesale price directly from photographers or jobbers, took a commission on sales, or handled it for photographers on a sale or return basis.[34]  
  
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In Rome one of the most significant dealers in photographs was the "Libreria Tedesca do Gius. Spithover". Josef Spithover[35] handled the work of many early photographers who documented the Roman monuments and those who made photographic reproductions of the artworks in the Vatican Museum. As travel guides became increasingly popular, the most notable being Karl Baedeker's Handbooks for Travellers, they would list where print and photographs could be purchased to ease the searches of the visually inclined traveller.[36] Josef also published photographic prints.
 
In Walks in Rome (1875) by Augustus John Cuthbert Hare there is a list of where photographs could be puchased in Rome and the specialities of the photographers:
Photographers.—For views of Rome.—Watson, Via Babuino; Macpherson, 12 Vicolo Aliberti; Mang, 104 Via Felice; Anderson (his photographs sold at Spithover's) ; Joseph Phelps, 169 Via Babuino; Maggi, 329 Corso. For Artistic Bits, very much to be recommended, De Bonis, 11 Via Felice. For Portraits.—Suscipi, 48 Via Condotti (the best for medallions); Alessandri, 12 Corso (excellent for Cartes de Visite); Lais, 57 Via del Campo-Marzo; Ferretti, 50 Via Sta. Maria in Via.[37]
The following, somewhat lengthy, passage is taken from John Murray's A Handbook of Rome and its Environs (1864) and gives the information a traveller to Rome would require to assist in purchasing photographs. Note how reproductions or art, photographs of the monuments were sold by the photographers themselves from their studios or through a number of print shops. Within this text names of some of the key photographers of nineteenth century Rome are mentioned including Tommaso Cuccioni, James Anderson[38] and Pietro Dovizielli.
Photography has of late years been very successfully applied in representing not only the ancient and modern monuments of Rome, but sculpture, and in copying the original drawings of the old masters. A less legitimate application of it perhaps has been the reproduction of the chefs-d'oeuvre of the old masters from engravings, for it is scarcely necessary to remark that to the present time photography has imperfectly succeeded in copying oil pictures from the originals. The purchaser will therefore do well to bear in mind that what may be sold to him as a photographic copy of a painting has been in reality made from an engraving in the greater number of instances, or from a drawing. The most eminent artists in photography at Rome are Sig. Cuccioni, an Italian, at 18, Via Condotti, and Mr. Anderson, an Englishman. Cuccioni's photographs are excellent, and the large ones of the Coliseum, the Roman Forum, St. Peter's, St. Paul's, the Castle of St. Angelo, the Fontana di Trevi, &c., are chefs-d'oeuvres. unique for their size and execution; his reproductions of the ancient sculptures in the museums of the Capitol and Vatican are also extremely good. Mr. Anderson's photographs, the best we have seen, are extremely faithful and good, and of different sizes to suit all purses and purchasers: they can only be procured at Spithover's library. Mr. Anderson is the most extensive producer of photographs in Rome, and his productions, as those of Cuccioni, stand the light well. Some of Anderson's finest photographs of old paintings have been made from exquisite drawings by Sig. Rocchi, which deserve to be distinguished from those taken from engravings. A. has also photographed the works in sculpture of the most eminent modern artists, Gibson, Macdonald, Spence, Cardwell, Hosmer, &c; many of the chefs-d'oeuvre of the Vatican and Capitoline Museums; and the finest at the Villa Ludovisi. Mr. Macpherson, 12, Vicolo di Aliberti, near the Piazza di Spagna, where his photographs can only be procured. Dovizielli, 136, Via Babuino; especially for the photographs of Raphael's frescoes in the Farnesina Palace. Mr. Ferrando, 11, Via Bocca di Leone, opposite the Hotel d'Angleterre, for portraits and reproductions from the works of the old masters. The price of photographs varies with the size: those of Anderson from 2 1/2 to 12 pauls ; those of Cuccioni from 5 pauls to 1 scudo ; and of Macpherson 1 sc.; Cuccioni's magnificent views of the Forum, St. Peter's, the Castle of St. Angelo, and the Coliseum, in 2 and 3 pieces which join perfectly, from 5 to 10 scudi. Inferior photographs to the above-mentioned may be had at the principal print-shops; and those adapted for the stereoscope, mostly made in Paris, at Spithover's and Piale's libraries, at Ansiglioni's, 150, Corso, and Suscipi's, 182 in the same street.[39]
To assist in selection of photographs commercial catalogues were published by photographers and rare examples of these have survived. 
  
507.13   Travel >  Karl Baedeker's Handbooks for Travellers 
  
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The travel handbooks of Karl Baedeker and his descendents[40] provided tips on where to purchase the finest photographs.
 
Beirut
Photographers. Dumas, in the street leading from the two principal hotels into the town. The photographs, generally good and cheap, should be bought of the photographers themselves, and not from the dealers who offer them at the hotels. Unmounted photographs should be rolled on a piece of wood, or packed in a tin box which may be bought at the bazaar for a few piastres.[41]  
  
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"Dumas" would be Tancrède Dumas.
 
Jerusalem
Books, Photographs. Shapira, Christian Street. is the best shop; then Bergheim, in the same street. Photographs of every part of Palestine, medium size 18 fr. per dozen. They should be bought unmounted, and rolled on a round piece of wood to facilitate transport.[42]  
  
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Cairo
Photographs. Schoefft, Abbasiyeh Street (Place Faghalla), with a good background for groups: also a fine collection of groups of natives, and a few desert scenes, some of which are very striking (various prices ; a collection of 25, of small size, is sold for 25 fr.). Helios, Rue du Tribunal, with a handsome studio; Calamidia, Kosetti Garden: Bechart, in the Ezbekiyeh Garden, and others. Among the numerous photographs of Egyptian landscapes and temples the best are those by Sebah of Constantinople, which may be purchased at his depot, adjoining the French consulate in the Ezbekiyeh, or at Kauffmann's. Hr. E. Brugsch, the keeper of the Bulak Museum (p. 293), has caused a number of the objects in the museum to be photographed. This collection, which costs 25 fr., maybe purchased at the museum, or at Kauffmann's, but is not sold by the photographers.[43]  
  
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The photographers in the handbook included "Brechart" who is presumably Émile Béchard or Henri Béchard, Pascal Sebah and Egyptologist Emil Brugsch.
 
London
Photograph-sellers : J. Gerson, 5 Rathbone Place (photographs of the pictures in the National Gallery, etc.); Hauff, 46 Southampton Row, Holborn (Braun's photographs of the pictures in the National Gallery); Autotype Fine Art Gallery, 74 New Oxford Street; Mansell, 271-273 Oxford Street; Marion (photographic materials), 23 Soho Square; London Stereoscopic Company, 54 Cheapside and 108 Regent Street; Spooner, 379 Strand.[44]  
  
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The "Braun" referred to would be Adolphe Braun who with his carbon printing works at Dornach in Swtzerland a major publishers of photographic reproductions of art. The London Stereoscopic Company was a highly significant publisher of stereoviews.
 
Florence
On the Cafes of Florence: Visitors to the cafe's are frequently importuned by hawkers of photographs, etc., who often sell their wares at one-third or one-half of the price at first demanded, and by the well-known Fioraje, or flower-girls.[45]  
  
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Venice
Photographs: Naya, in the Piazza of St. Mark, views of Venice, from the smallest at about 50 c. to the large and expensive size (28 by 36 inches), copies from drawings I 1/2, from original pictures 4 fr[46]  
  
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The "Naya" mentioned in the hanbook for Venice was Carlo Naya.
 
This is only a smattering of examples from a single guide book publisher and no doubt a diligent researcher could find many more and track the changes over time. 
  
   19thc Studio Marketing 
View exhibition 
Title | Lightbox | Checklist
 
  
507.14   Travel >  Souvenir photograph albums 
  
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   19thc Photograph Albums Covers 
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Title | Lightbox | Checklist
 
  
507.15   Travel >  Souvenir sets of travel photographs 
  
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Small wallets made of stiff card containing miniature views of tourist destinations were common souvenirs through the nineteenth century.[47] 
  
507.16   Travel >  Paperweight travel souvenirs 
  
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Reminiscences and the armchair traveler 
  
507.17   Travel >  Théophile Gautier: Wanderings in Spain (1853) 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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Théophile Gautier Wanderings in Spain (London: Ingram, Cooke, and Co., 1853), p.22.
The sun was setting when we entered Vittoria; after threading all sorts of streets, of but middling architectural style and very bad taste, the coach stopped at the parador vejo, where our luggage was scrupulously examined. Our Daguerreotype especially alarmed the worthy custom-house officers a good deal; they approached it with the greatest precautions, like people who are afraid of being blown up; I think they imagined it to be an electrifying machine, and I took care not to undeceive them.
 
  
507.18   Travel >  Mr. E. K. Tenison, of Kilbonan Castle, exhibited a number of photographs of very large size, representing views in Spain (1853) 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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Edward King Tenison was one of the earliest photographers taking calotypes in Spain. Some of his calotypes were shown at The Irish Industrial Exhibition of 1853. In 1854 he published an album Memories of Spain (Recuerdos de Espana) which contained forty calotypes of Spanish towns that had been taken between 1852 and 1854. His wife Lady Louisa Mary Anne Tenison wrote about her time in Spain in various magazine articles and her book Castile and Andulucia (London, 1853).
 
John Sproule The Irish Industrial Exhibition of 1853: A Detailed Catalogue of its Contents (Dublin: James McGlashan, 1854), Class X, p.234-235.
Mr. E. K. Tenison, of Kilbonan Castle, exhibited a number of photographs of very large size, representing views in Spain. Although we have seen some French photographs, especially those of M. Martens, of Pans, far superior to those views, yet, when we take their great size into account, they were certainly remarkable examples, and showed what may be expected from this branch of art, when fully perfected. The finest and most effective specimen in the whole collection was a view of the city of Toledo; the view of the east end of Burgos Cathedral was also admirable; as were those of the Church of San Pablo. at Valladolid; and the Royal Palace of Madrid. There were two examples of the effects of treating (the pictures with solutions of certain substances. One was a charming view of Cordova, of a peculiar and exceedingly agreeable warm yellow tint, produced by immersing the positive picture in extemely dilute muriatic acid. There was another example of this fine sunny, sepia-like tint, in a pretty view of the Gate of Cordova. The second example of the effect of certain solutions was a view of the Palio de los Reyes, or Escurial, which had a curious violet tint, produced by immersing the picture in a solution of chloride of gold in aqua regia. It was, in fact, to some extent, an example of the chrysotype of Herschel, above alluded to. Several of these photographs exhibited great inequality of tints, such as the Portal of Leon Cathedral, which was too black in the doorways; and the Congresso de los Deputados, or Chamber of Deputies, at Madrid, the fore-ground of which was absolutely black. It is probable, that had the negatives of these pictures been weakened by the process of Blanquart-Everard, they would have been excellent. This defect is most likely to occur in taking views of buildings where there is a great contrast of light and shade, and hence the process alluded to for weakening the negative is worthy of attention.
 
  
Books and portfolios of prints based on, or purportedly based on, photographs 
  
507.19   Travel >  Paris et ses Environs Reproduits par le Daguerrotype, Sous la Direction de M. Ch. Philipon (Paris: Chez Aubert et Cie, 1840) 
  
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The book Paris et ses environs : reproduits par le daguerreotype[48] (1840) includes tinted lithographs of Paris and Versailles.[49] 
  
507.20   Travel >  Noël Marie Paymal Lerebours: Excursions daguerriennes : vues et monuments les plus remarquables du globe 
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Noël Marie Paymal Lerebours was a French optical instrument maker, photographer and publisher. Soon after the announcement of photography in 1839 he sent Daguerreotypists around the world to photograph the wonders of the globe. The resulting images were converted into engravings and published in Excursions daguerriennes: Vues et monuments les plus remarquables du globe (1842).[50] Published in parts The Civil Engineer and Architect's Journal review of Part V. read:
We recommend this work to our readers. It comes out in numbers containing well executed engravings of scenes and buildings sketched by the Daguerreotype. In this publication the admirable capabilities of photography for architectural delineation is fully shown, and we have no doubt will prove extremely interesting. In this number are the Maison Came at Nismes, the Trajan column at Rome, the Church of Basil the Great at Moscow, and a view of the Mola at Naples.[51]
Engravings based on photographs were becoming close to reality and this would affect the styles used by engravers as they strove to illustrate what had been captured with light. 
  
507.21   Travel >  Adolphe Duperly: Daguerian Excursions in Jamaica (1840) 
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Adolphe Duperly (1801-1865) arrived in Jamaica in 1830s and established himself as an engraver. The book Daguerian Excursions in Jamaica (ca. 1844)[52][53] by Adolphe Duperly included engravings based upon daguerreotypes the location of which is currently unknown. Duperly's firm was a highly successful one in Jamaica and continued through his son and grandson. 
  
507.22   Travel >  Bruges, ses Monuments et ses Tableaux, edited by Daveluy (Bruges, Daveluy, 1855) 
  
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Travel books 
  
507.23   Travel >  Roger Fenton: The Conway in the Stereoscope (1860) 
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Roger Fenton, well known for his photographs taken during the Crimean War,[54] also took a number of stereoviews of the River Conway in Wales that were published in The Conway in the Stereoscope (1860).[55]
 
The book was published by Lowell Reeve in London, a publishing firm that already had experience in tipping-in[56] stereo photographs as they had published Teneriffe - An Astronomer’s Experiment by Charles Piazzi Smyth in 1857.[57] 
  
507.24   Travel >  William Despard Hemphill: The Abbeys, Castles, and Scenery of Clonmel and the Surrounding Countryside (1860) 
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Dr. William Despard Hemphill (1816-1902) was an early Irish photographer who took stereoscopic photographs and used them early on for book illustration. His, presumably privately printed, book The Abbeys, Castles, and Scenery of Clonmel and the Surrounding Countryside (1860) is a very early example of this. 
  
507.25   Travel >  Louis de Clercq: Voyage en Orient (1860) 
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Louis de Clercq (1836-1901) was a French photographer who accompanied the 1858-59 government-sponsored expedition of the historian Emmanuel-Guillaume Rey[58] to study archaeological sites, especially the Crusader castles, in Syria and Asia Minor. de Clercq published 222 calotypes in his six volume work Voyage en Orient 1859-1860, villes, monuments et vues pittoresques (1860).[59] 
  
507.26   Travel >  Francis Bedford: The Prince of Wales and his trip to the East (1862) 
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The Royal Collection in the UK includes The Prince of Wales's diary which contains insights into his 1862 Tour[60] accompanied by photographer Francis Bedford.[61]
 
4 March 1862
We then proceeded on the dromedaries (not at all an unpleasant mode of conveyance) to the celebrated Pyramids of Ghizeh - They quite exceeded my expectations, & are certainly wonderful mementoes of our forefathers. We visited the Sphinx just before sunset, which is also very curious and interesting. We had a charming little encampment just below the Pyramids where we slept for the night'
13 March 1862
"....The ruins of Philae are beautiful and most interesting and Mr. Bedford the photographer, who came from England with me and our party took some very good views...."
14 March 1862
"....Mr. Bedford (the photographer who accompanied us from England) took some very successful views of the temple (at Edfoo)".
21 April 1862
".... We lunched under a figtree at 12 o'clock on the site of where once the city of Capernaum is said to have stood, + Mr. Bedford photographed us 'en groupe'."
4 May 1862
"At about 10 we left our camp to lionize thoroughly the fine temple (at Baalbec) + we were much pleased with what we saw. We remained about two hours going over it; Mr. Bedford took some excellent views of it, which will be a great addition to his collection of photographs...."
 
  
   Francis  Bedford Tour 
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507.27   Travel >  Francis Bedford: The Prince of Wales and his trip to the East - Covers (1863) 
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In 1862 Francis Bedford accompanied the Prince of Wales on a tour of the ancient sites of Egypt and the Holy Land and the photographs were published in the four volume "Photographic Pictures made by Mr. Francis Bedford during the Tour in the East, in which ... he accompanied ... the Prince of Wales" (London: Day & Son, 1863) and a later 1866 edition.[62] 
  
   Francis  Bedford Tour 
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507.28   Travel >  Edward Bierstadt: Gems of American Scenery, consisting of Stereocopic Views among the White Mountains (1878) 
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Edward Bierstadt (1824-1906) was an engraver and photographer of landscapes and portraits and the brother of the painter Albert Bierstadt. on 17 November 1875 Edward Bierstadt filed a US Patent for Improvement in stereoscopes which was granted on 21 March 1876. The patent was for a method of adding stereoviews into books with eyeglasses built in to allow for their viewing.[63] His book Gems of American Scenery, consisting of Stereocopic Views among the White Mountains, [1878][64] included stereoviews of the White Mountains in New Hampshire, an area that had been photographed by dentist, and amateur daguerreotypist, Samuel A. Bemis in the early 1840s. 
  
507.29   Travel >  J. Payne Jennings: Book covers 
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The rapid growth of an urban middle class in England during the nineteenth century went hand-in-hand with the expansion of a comprehensive railway system providing leisure opportunities. Picturesque regions like the Lake District and the Norfolk Boards in East Anglia were particularly popular and the scenic photographs of J. Payne Jennings were used by the Great Eastern Railway Company to encourage rail travel to rural idylls far removed, and yet accessible, from the major cities. 
  
507.30   Travel >  Photographically illustrated books for the armchair traveler 
  
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Henry Fox Talbot in his far-sighted book The Pencil of Nature (1844) illustrated with examples the diverse ways in which photography was applicable to a whole range of tasks. His futile attempts with the capturing of landscapes was precipitated by his own failure to use a camera lucida to his own satisfaction to capture the landscape during his travels to Lake Como. As he wrote:
One of the first days of the month of October 1833, I was amusing myself on the lovely shores of the Lake of Como, in Italy, taking sketches with Wollaston's Camera Lucida, or rather I should say, attempting to take them: but with the smallest possible amount of success. For when the eye was removed from the prism—in which all looked beautiful—I found that the faithless pencil had only left traces on the paper melancholy to behold.
 
After various fruitless attempts, I laid aside the instrument and came to the conclusion, that its use required a previous knowledge of drawing, which unfortunately I did not possess.[65]
His "fruitless attempts" at rendering Italian landscapes to his own satisfaction led him to experiments with chemistry and light to his discovery of one of the early processes of photography. Here we need to understand the reasons for the drawings in the first place - the primary motivation is to document a landscape as a visual aide-memoire for a later time when removed from the location. It is tangible visual evidence of a location seen on one's travels and one that can be shared and enjoyed with others. In The Pencil of Nature Talbot included calotypes of Oxford, Paris, Orleans, London as well as his own house at Laycock Abbey in Wiltshire. He appreciated that a primary function of photography was the documentation of places and this preceded the travel photobooks that would rapidly follow. With daguerreotypes magnificent views could be taken and cityscapes recorded but they were one-offs as there was no negative and there existence only on a metal substrate made the production of books including them impractical.[66]
 
From the 1850s onwards books of exploration and less arduous travel were produced including ones with stereoviews such as those of Roger Fenton on The Conway in the Stereoscope (1860)[67], William Despard Hemphill 's volume on The Abbeys, Castles, and Scenery of Clonmel and the Surrounding Countryside (1860)[68] and Edward Bierstadt's Gems of American Scenery, consisting of Stereocopic Views among the White Mountains.[69]
 
Illustrated publications were used to support commercial ventures for example with John Payne Jennings promoting railways and tourism in England or Edward Bierstadt who was hired by William West Durant to take photographs for an advertising brochure - The Adirondacks, Artotype Views Among the Mountains and Lakes of the North Woods in the USA.
 
As the nineteenth century progressed the number of books with tipped-in photographs increased and travel was an ideal subject as the middle class expanded and European powers expanded their colonial domains. For those lacking the time to travel books with photographs were an educational substitute for the armchair traveller. 
  
Stereo sets 
  
507.31   Travel >  Stereoview libraries for the armchair traveler 
  
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Stereoviews[70] were enormously popular in the nineteenth century supported by the research and use of influential figures like David Brewster[71] and Oliver Wendell Holmes.[72] Some photographers such as Charles Piazzi-Smyth (1858),[73], Roger Fenton (1860),[74] William Despard Hemphill (1860),[75] and Edward Bierstadt (1878)[76] produced books illustrated with stereoviews.
 
Photographers who are now a significant part of the history of photography such as Timothy H. O'Sullivan took stereoviews on the Explorations and Surveys West of the 100th Meridian (1871-1874) and Carleton E. Watkins recorded the landscapes of the American West in his Pacific Coast Views which continued until around 1876 and later in the Watkins New Series.
 
Companies such as Underwood & Underwood,[77] the Keystone View Company[78], Kilburn Brothers[79] and H.C. White massed produced sets of stereocards allowing the family to virtually travel the wonders of the world from their own home. For the wealthy specialist furniture was available to shelve these ever-growing sets. 
  
Travel clichés of the nineteenth century 
  
507.32   Travel >  Egypt: Climbing the Pyramids 
  
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With each significant location around the world there are common shots and views of travellers clambering up the Great Pyramid in Egypt is one of these. It was the nineteenth century equivalent of being photographed on a rollercoaster at a Disney theme park.
 
Contemporary accounts of the climb indicate the effort required.
 
George Anson, A Voyage Round the World, in the Years 1740, 41, 42, 43, 44 (W. Smith), p. 10
Even as I walked around it, and looked up at it from the base, I did not feel its immensity until I commenced ascending; then, having climbed some distance up, when I stopped to breathe and looked down upon my friend below, who was dwindled to insect size, and then up at the great distance between me and the summit, i then realized in all their force the huge dimensions of this giant work. It took me twenty minutes to mount to the summit; about the same time that it had required to mount the cones of Etna and Vesuvius. The ascent is not particularly difficult, at least with the assistance of the Arabs. There are two hundred and six tiers of stone, from one to four feet in height, each two or three feet smaller than the one below, making what are called the steps. Very often the steps were so high that I could not reach them with my feet. Indeed, for the most part, I was obliged to climb with my knees, deriving great assistance from the step which one Arab made for me with his knee, and the helping hand of another above.[80]
Henry Edward Fan, 1842, Five Years in India (London: Henry Colburn), p. 291:
We first climbed to the top of the Great Pyramid, one of the most fatiguing jobs I ever had the misfortune to try; and what between the heat and smell of the Arabs, who insisted upon lifting one up, whether one liked it or not, and the height of the stones, I was nearly exhausted when I found myself on the top: the entire pyramid being some 450 feet high.[81]
Sir John Gardner Wilkinson, 1858, Murrays - A Handbook for Travellers in Egypt (London: John Murray), p. 166
The first thing the traveller generally does, on arriving at the pyramids, is to ascend that of Cheops. The ascent is by no means difficult, though fatiguing to some unaccustomed to climbing, from the height of the stones, while others ascend with the greatest ease; and I have known one, an officer of the Cyclops, reach the top in 8 min. Ladies, who are often dragged up, rather than assisted, by the Arabs, will find a great advantage in having a couple of steps, or a footstool, to be carried by the Arabs, and put down where the stones are high; and this would be not less useful in descending than in going up the pyramid. [82]
 
  
Travel literature 
  
507.33   Travel >  Jules Verne: Around the World in Eighty Days - What would Phileas Fogg and Passepartout have seen in 1872? 
  
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The world as it was when Phileas Fogg and his valet Passepartout passed through on their fictional voyage around the world in 1872.
Great Britain
Egypt
India
Hong Kong Japan
America
Ireland
Great Britain
What would the dashing pair have witnessed along the way during their intrepid travels?
 
When Jules Verne's book Around the World in Eighty Days[83] was published in 1873 the world was at a stage of rapid industrial development.
 
Only a few years earlier the Suez Canal had been opened greatly reducing the time required to travel from Western Europe to India and the Far East. On 10 May 1869 the rails were joined at Promontary Summit for the Transcontinental railway in the United States. The railway station in Yokohama opened in 1872 symbolizing the immense changes in Japan which had been largely closed to foreigners until the Black Ships of Admiral Perry arrived in 1853. Emmigration and immigration during this period was enormous and ships such as the S/S Manhattan of the Guion Line crossed from Liverpool to New York six times between 1870-1872 and companies like the Pacific Mail Steamship company plied the routes between San Francisco, Panama, Yokohama, Hong Kong and Singapore.
 
The times were far from tranquil: Lieutenant Camus had been killed in Japan in 1868 by Samurai who objected to the presence of foreigners; San Francisco had an earthquake also in 1868, and between 1870 and 1871 there were the Orange Riots in New York. The bison mentioned in the novel were being exterminated in the US and the Battle of the Little Bighorn would happen only a few years later in 1876 changing the ways of the Plains Indians forever.
 
The setting for this online exhibition is the two and a half months from 2nd October 1872 until 21st December 1872 as the fictional Phileas Fogg and his valet Passepartout circumnavigate the globe to win a wager of £40,000. This exhibition follows the approximate route they took and shows the places as they were when the fictional pair passed through. The exact route has not been slavishly followed, nor have the exact dates, but rather they are explored through the visual remains of a long gone world.
 
Following the popularity of Around the World in Eighty Days by Jules Verne the adventurous journalist Nellie Bly set out in 1889 to prove that the journey was viable. Supported by her newspaper, the New York World she completed the trip within 72 days and her book, Around the World in Seventy-Two Days,[84] was also a best seller. 
  
   Around The World in Eighty Days 
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507.34   Travel >  Francis Frith: Illustrations for Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's Hyperion (1865) 
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Francis Frith is best known for his views of Egypt, his photographically-illustrated books on Egypt, Sinai and Palestine[85] and the company he established that became a major seller of postcards and illustrated books on different regions especially within Great Britain. Frith had also used his photographs to illustrate editions of the Holy Bible.[86]
 
In 1865 Francis Frith spent six weeks travelling down the Rhine viewing the landscapes and visiting the cities and points of interest along the way in Switzerland, Austria and Germany.[87] He used the photographs he took along the route to illustrate the novel Hyperion by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow which had been published in 1839 by Samuel Coleman, incidently 1839 was the year photography publicly announced. In the novel the fictional character Paul Flemming travels through Germany whilst pondering his own revelations on nature, romanticism and his religious belief. The passages within the novel led Longfellow enthusiasts to use it as a travel guide to accompany them on their own journeys within Germany. The photographs of Francis Frith attempt to capture both the locations and the mood of the novel. 
  
507.35   Travel >  Mark Twain attempting to photograph the Matterhorn (1880) 
  
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Mark Twain in his book A Tramp Abroad related the difficulties of taking mountain scenery:
But lonely, conspicuous, and superb rose that wonderful upright wedge, the Matterhorn. Its precipitous sides were powdered over with snow, and the upper half hidden in thick clouds which now and then dissolved to cobweb films and gave brief glimpses of the imposing tower as through a veil. A little later the Matterhorn 1 took to himself the semblance of a volcano; he was stripped naked to his apex around this circled vast wreaths of white cloud which strung slowly out and streamed away slantwise toward the sun, a twenty-mile stretch of rolling and tumbling vapour, and looking just as if it were pouring out of a crater.
 
1 Note. I had the very unusual luck to catch one little momentary glimpse of the Matterhorn wholly unencumbered by clouds. I levelled my photographic apparatus at it without the loss of an instant, and should have got an elegant picture if my donkey had not interfered. It was my purpose to draw this photograph all by myself for my book, but was obliged to put the mountain part of it into the hands of the professional artist because I found I could not do landscape well.[88]
 
  
Albums and diaries 
  
507.36   Travel >  Albums and travel diaries created by travelers 
  
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507.37   Travel >  Luis Pastorino: Fotografias de Montevideo (1880) 
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This 1880 album "Fotografias de Montevideo" consists of 24 albumen prints taken by Luis Pastorino, Fotografo, 94A Calle Minas, Montevideo. 
  
   Landscape Urban Montevideo 1880 
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507.38   Travel >  Enrico Van Lint: Ricordo di Pisa (ca 1875-1880) 
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Italian photographer Enrico Van Lint (1808-1884) was a master of the calotype and documented the monuments of the city of Pisa.[89] This small album entitled Ricordo di Pisa from around 1875-1880 shows tourist locations devoid of people and was presumably intended as a souvnir. 
  
   Enrico  Van Lint 
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507.39   Travel >  Frank Jay Haynes: Alaska Views (ca. 1891) 
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An album of 24 vintage albumen prints from the series "Alaska Views" taken by the noted Western photographer F. Jay Haynes (1853-1921) circa 1891.[90] 
  
   Landscape Alaska Views 
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507.40   Travel >  Album of cyanotypes of Florence, Italy (1880s or later) 
  
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Cyanotypes are rarely found in Italy. Cyanotype views are even rarer, while twelve topographical cyanotypes in a studio album format are virtually unknown, at least in my experience as a collector. Unfortunately, the studio which produced these images is not indicated, though the maker would appear to be a professional photographer who had worked in Florence. He used more than one lens, and he had access to privileged viewpoints, which would not have been available to amateurs or visiting foreigners. The subjects reflect the typical itinerary of the ‘grand tour’ souvenir album of the city, and they were probably derived from glass plates made at an earlier date, probably the early 1880s. The positioning of the camera and the absence of shadows suggests that each view was taken at the most appropriate time of the day, i.e., they are the result of a sustained and costly effort to capture the moment when each subject could be photographed to its best advantage. If albums such as this were intended as a commercial enterprise, however, we can reasonably conclude that the attempt was not a commercial success.[91] 
  
507.41   Travel >  Clara Whitcomb`s diary: Egypt and the Levant (1898-1899) 
  
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In December 1898, Clara Whitcomb, a young woman from Chicago, chronicled her trip to Egypt and the Levant in 1898-1899 in a diary. What makes her remarkable to us, one hundred and eight years later, is that her diary was preserved, allowing us to experience her adventures in the present. Clara illustrated her concise and often witty descriptions of the local people, architecture, and geography with souvenir photographs, hotel receipts, stationery and postcards.[92] 
  
507.42   Travel >  Photograph album - An Unknown Street Photographer in Paris (1896) 
  
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These photographs come from a small, olive green Kodak album with the handwritten inscription on the inside cover, "Paris, 1896". The size of the prints, 1½ x 2 inches, indicates they were taken with a Pocket Kodak Camera, first released the year before. There are 92 photographs in all.
 
So much for the technical information; the real value of this album is that it represents the work of an amateur street photographer during the very earliest years of snapshot photography. More than that, the composition of a lot of the images is enigmatic. It anticipates an aesthetic that didn’t become popular until the introduction of the SLR camera some thirty years later and it leads us to wonder whether some of the photographs are the accidents they first appear to be.
 
The photographer has left a few, spare clues about his identity. The shadow cast in one photograph indicates it is a man and from two images it appears he may have been wandering the streets in the company of a friend. The inscriptions written in faint pencil on the album pages are in French although we can’t assume that was his native language. Tourists often give the local names for landmarks. One thing seems certain; though he may have been an amateur by inclination, his eye for photography is sophisticated, suggesting previous experience, a background in visual arts or at the least, a natural affinity.
 
A sizeable number of photographs in the album have to do with motion; bicyclists, horse drawn buggies and pedestrians hurrying through the streets. In December the previous year the Lumiére brothers had given the first public exhibition of their cinematograph and Etienne Jules Marey was still perfecting chronophotographic cameras. Capturing motion was constantly discussed in photographic journals and in newspapers and though no capable high speed cameras were commercially available in 1896, they were an inevitability. The new Pocket Kodak had a shutter speed of 1 1/25 of a second, still not fast enough to eliminate blur but it was small and light enough to exert some control over the image. As the photographer strolled through the Bois de Boulogne and snapped at bicyclists, he was as interested in experimenting with the possibilities of his new camera as he was in documenting city life.
 
Most amateur photo albums contain at least one image with an exact and revelatory composition that holds our attention. Generally we put that down to coincidence, but with this album the composition in so many images is carefully considered. Take, for example No. 14, a woman pushing a pram. The balance and pattern of the image, with the baby’s head placed under the dome and the woman at the centre is very neat. It appears as though the photographer saw the image materializing, perhaps as she was a few metres away, and positioned himself, steadying the camera against his chest and watching for the moment through the viewfinder.
 
With other images he intrudes, pushing his camera as close as possible without attracting obvious attention. In one of the most mysterious images (No. 19), a woman’s face is cropped neatly in half, the Pont Royal in the background. We could accept this as a lucky accident but the same apparent haphazardness is found in other images and on closer view they all reveal a harmony in the composition that begins to look deliberate. In the photograph of several men sitting on park benches (No. 25), the man in the right foreground is cropped, again, in half. The whole shape of the photograph leads towards the top hatted figure at the rear but it’s the hand on the silver topped cane that draws us back. In No. 24, another photographer (his friend?) is shot adjusting his camera. His head is cut off. Had a photographer like Andre Kertesz taken this in the 1930s we’d get the pun immediately and talk about it in terms of vision and identity. Only the date and this photographer’s anonymity prevent us from thinking he may have been making the same point.
 
Other photographs evoke Walker Evans’ streetscapes and (not surprisingly) J. H Lartigue’s juvenile snapshots[93]. Looking at the album in its entirety, it’s clear that although he has photographed many landmarks, the photographer is less interested in Paris as a subject than in the possibilities it offers for exploring something more intangible. If not an artist by profession, he was by disposition.
 
John Toohey (August 2009) 
  
   19thc Souvenir Albums 
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507.43   Travel >  G.K. Ballance: Travel in Switzerland and Italy (1900-1910) 
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English photographer G.K. Ballance, of Menton, England was active in the early 1900s and was part of the naturalist movement. He is known primarily for his platinum prints and while he worked throughout Europe he was most prolific in Switzerland, Italy and England. In 1908, while in Switzerland, he exhibited at the Fifth Annual Exhibition of Photographs of the Worcester Art Museum (UK). Later in 1930 and 1931, while active in the pictorialist’s circles in England, he exhibited at the Annual Exhibition of the Royal Photographic Society
  
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507.44   Travel >  Charles Breed: The Wellcome Photographic Exposure Record and Diary - 1910 - French trip 
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Photographer Charles Breed travelled to France in 1910 and between the 15 June and 1 September he recorded each of the photographs he took in a The Wellcome Photographic Exposure Record and Diary - 1910. The page of the book are divided into columns, Date / No. of Slide / Plate or Film (this column the photographer changed so he could note the Lens used) / Time of Day / Light / Stop / Exposure / Subject, notes on lighting etc. / No. of Negative and he filled them in diligently. Along with his photographic endeavours he noted some of the presents he purchased including lace, gloves and two pipes. 
  
Autochromes and early colour travel photography 
  
507.45   Travel >  Autochromes: From around the world 
  
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Albert Kahn
 
"A reconciled world in which every civilization could communicate and live in perfect harmony": such was the Utopia pursued by the banker Albert Kahn (1860-1940) as soon as he made his fortune.[94]
 
In the gardens he had landscaped between 1895 and 1910 as the backdrop to his solitary life, Albert kahn juxtaposed the diverse scenes which reflected the world of his dreams. The Around the World travel grants (1898), the Around the World Society (1906), the Archives of the Planet (1909), the National Committee of Social and Political Studies (1916) and the Social Documentation Center of the French Ecole Normale Supérieure (1920) were all foundations that saw the light of day in his property in Boulogne and shared the same objective: to bring nations closer together, to bring about a deeper understanding of other realities throughout the world.
 
The Archives of the Planet consist in 72,000 Autochromes and 183,000 meters of film shot in around fifty countries of the world between 1909 and 1931.
 
© Albert Kahn Museum
14, rue du port
92100 Boulogne-Billancourt
France
Email : museealbertkahn@cg92.fr
 
Gabriel Veyre
 
The French photographer Gabriel Veyre was 25 years old when he was engaged by the Lumière brothers as a cinematograph operator with the mission to show to the world their new invention. From 1896 to 1900 he traveled around the globe (Cuba, Mexico, Colombia, Venezuela, Panama, Japan, China, Indo-China and Canada) and brought back many films and photographs.
 
In 1901 he became the photographer and cinematographer of the Sultan of Morocco. Still in contact with the Lumière brothers who have just marketed the Autochrome, Gabriel Veyre became one of its more enthusiastic ambassadors, finding in the light of Morocco an inexhaustible source of inspiration.
 
He died at the same time as the autochrome plate in 1936, leaving behind hundreds of remarkable images which today are part of the visual memory of Morocco.
 
© Philippe Jacquier / Gabriel Veyre collection - www.gabrielveyre-collection.org
 
Fred Payne Clatworthy
 
Fred Payne Clatworthy was born in Dayton, Ohio in 1875. The son of a minister, the family moved to Evanston, Illinois in 1884. Though trained as a lawyer, Clatworthy‘s passion was photography. In 1905, Clatworthy moved to Estes Park, Colorado, eventually setting up a studio, curio shop, and gallery on it’s main street.
 
In 1914, Clark Blickensderfer an accomplished amateur photographer introduced Clatworthy to the autochrome process. As John Wood noted in The Photographic Arts (1997) Clatworthy "perfected his art with countless experimentation. He did not make a few autochromes, a few hundred, or even a few thousand, but more than ten thousand."
 
As Clatworthy became proficient with the process, he soon felt compelled to re-photograph many of the scenes that he had previously photographed in black-and-white. As a practical matter, Clatworthy sold hand-colored versions of his black-and-white images in his studio. These would vary in size, the coloring applied either in watercolor or in oil. He also sold "Albertype" postcards that were lithographic reproductions of hand-colored black-and-white postcards.
 
Clatworthy‘s association with National Geographic began in 1916. His first autochrome series appeared in the April 1923 issue. Titled "Western Views in the Land of the Best," it featured views of Colorado and the American Southwest. Clatworthy would not submit another series to Geographic due to the low amount of monetary remuneration (see section National Geographic and the Autochrome). However, once that situation improved, Clatworthy published an additional series beginning with the June, 1928 issue, "Photographing the West in Colors," followed by the August, 1929 series, "Scenic Glories of the Western United States." Another series appeared in July 1930, "Adventures in Color on Mexico‘s West Coast followed by a series in the July 1932 series called, "Colorado: Among the Peaks and Parks of the Rockies". The last series Clatworthy did for National Geographic was on California and appeared in November 1934: "A Sunshine Land of Fruits, Flowers, Movies, and Sport." By that point in time, autochromes were being replaced by newer color processes including Dufay, Finlay, Agfacolor, and, eventually Kodachrome.
 
Clatworthy would embark on an autochrome lecture circuit during the winter months when tourist season was virtually non-existent in Estes Park. Immensely popular, these lectures were delivered in all the principle cities of the US in front of crowds numbering from a few hundred to more than 3,000. It was in this endeavor, carried out over a number years, coupled with his many published autochromes that lead John Wood to declare Clatworthy "responsible for truly introducing autochromes to the American people."
 
Though Clatworthy was one of the most well known autochromists of his day, he, like many, if not most, of the other photographers who worked in the process, save for the Photo-Secessionists, have faded into an undeserved obscurity. This obscurity is not so much the result of the quality or importance of his work, but rather from the lack of attention photographic historians have in general paid to the autochrome process. When John Wood writes of Clatworthy, "There was no one like him in the history of the American autochrome; he was our Jules Gervais-Courtellemont" one cannot help but wonder if more than a handful of the most dedicated photo-historians know with whom he is being compared. Fortunately, the ease with which autochromes can be viewed on a computer monitor may signal a rise of awareness and interest. A chapter has been given to Clatworthy in John Wood’s The Photographic Arts (1997) and a new biography of Clatworthy by Richelle Cross Force is scheduled for release in 2006.
 
© Mark Jacobs 2006
 
Pierre Grange
 
Born in 1878 in France, a graduate of scientific and medical schools, Pierre Grange was an early adopter of the Autochrome process. From 1908 to 1938 he was an untiring traveler with his camera going through Switzerland, Belgium, Italy and France.
 
A scientific man, he stretched the capabilities of the Autochrome process, discovering for example how to push or slow down the development of the plate independently of the length of the pose.
 
In all, he took over 3,300 Autochromes during his many trips. Being a pioneer of the audio-visual, he lectured with projected Autochromes from his collection to the public at well attended shows."
 
© Philippe Grange - 2006 - jerpspitz@gmail.com 
  
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507.46   Travel >  Fernand Cuville: Greece: Mount Athos 
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Footnotes 
  
  1. Λ In 1842 Joseph-Philibert Girault de Prangey set off on a tour of Italy, Greece and the Middle East taking between 800 and 900 daguerreotypes of ancient monuments.
     
    On Joseph-Philibert Girault de Prangey - 1998, Girault de Prangey (1804-1892): dessins, peintures, photographies, études historiques, (Langres: Musées de Langres / D. Guéniot) [Exhibition catalogue]
     
    Sales catalogues - 2003, 20 May, Important Daguerreotypes by Joseph-Philbert Girault De Prangey from the Archive of the Artist - Part I - Christie's London, (London: Christies); 2004, 18 May, Important Daguerreotypes by Joseph-Philbert Girault De Prangey from the Archive of the Artist - Part II - Christie's London, (London: Christies) 
      
  2. Λ For John Ruskin - Karen Burns, 1997, ‘Topographies of Tourism: Documentary Photography and "The Stones of Venice"‘, Assemblage, vol. 32, pp. 22-44; Brian Hanson, 1981, ‘Carrying off the Grand Canal: Ruskin’s Architectural Drawings and the Daguerreotype‘, The Architectural Review, pp. 104-109; Stephen Wildman, 2006, Ruskin and the Daguerreotype, (Lancaster: Lancaster University / Ruskin Library); K. & J. Jacobson, 2014, Carry Off the Palaces: John Ruskin's Lost Daguerreotypes, (Quaritch) 
      
  3. Λ For William James Stillman - William James Stillman, 1876, Poetic Localities: Photographs of Adirondacks, Cambridge, Crete, Italy, Athens, (Boston: J.R. Osgood and Company) [Reprinted by Aperture, in association with the International Center of Photography, 1988]; Andrew Szegedy-Maszak, 2009, spring, ‘Athens. Photographed by W.J. Stillman‘, Princeton University Library Chronicle, vol. 70, no. 3, pp. 399-432
     
    Elizabeth Lindquist-Cock, 1979, ‘Stillman, Ruskin and Rossetti: The Struggle between Nature and Art‘, History of Photography, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 1-14 
      
  4. Λ For George Wilson Bridges - George Wilson Bridges, 1852 (ca), Selections from Seventeen-Hundred Genuine Photographs: (Views — Portraits — Statuary — Antiquities.) Taken around the Shores of the Mediterranean between the Years 1846 – 52. With, or without, Notes, Historical, and Descriptive. By a Wayworn Wanderer; Robert E. Lassam & Michael Gray, 1988, The Romantic Era: Reverendo Calvert Richard Jones, 1804-1877, Reverendo George Wilson Bridges, 1788-1863, William Robert Baker di Bayfordbury, 1810-1896, (Florence: Alinari) [Exhibition catalogue] 
      
  5. Λ For Francis Bedford - Francis Bedford, 1863, Photographic Pictures Made By Mr. Francis Bedford During the Tour in the East in which, by command, he accompanied His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales, (London: Day & Son); W.M. Thompson & Francis Bedford, 1860s, The Holy Land, Egypt, Constantinople, Athens: a series of forty-eight photographs, (London: Day) [Text and introduction by W.M. Thompson, photographs by Francis Bedford]; Linda Wheatley-Irving, 2007, Summer, ‘Holy Land Photographs and Their Words: Francis Bedford and the 'Tour in the East'‘, Jerusalem Quarterly, vol. 31, pp. 79-96; Sophie Gordon, John McCarthy & Badr El-Hage, 2013, Cairo to Constantinople: Francis Bedford's Photographs of the Middle East, (Royal Collection Publications) 
      
  6. Λ For Robert Macpherson - Robert Macpherson, 1863, Vatican Sculptures, Selected and Arranged in the Order in which they are Found in the Galleries, (London: Chapman & Hall)
     
    Pietro Becchetti & Carlo Pietrangeli, 1987, Robert Macpherson: Un inglese fotografo a Roma, (Rome: Quasar Editions); Alistair Crawford, 1999, ‘Robert Macpherson 1814-72, The Foremost Photographer of Rome‘, Papers of the British School at Rome, vol. 67, pp. 353-403; Alistair Crawford, 2008, ‘Robert Macpherson 1814-1872: The Final Proof‘, in Jubilee - 30 Years ESHPh; Congress of Photography in Vienna; Ray McKenzie, 1996, Spring, ‘Scottish Photographers in Nineteenth-century Italy. Robert Macpherson and his Contemporaries‘, History of Photography, vol. 20, pp. 33-40; Marjorie Munsterburg, 1986, March, ‘A Biographical Sketch of Robert Macpherson‘, The Art Bulletin, vol. 68, no. 1, pp. 142-153; David Wooters, 1996, Spring, ‘The Quiet Art of Robert Macpherson: An Explication‘, History of Photography, vol. 20, pp. 2-3 
      
  7. Λ For James Anderson - Ritter, Dorothea & Siegert, Dietmar, 2005, Rome 1846-1870 James Anderson und die Maler-Fotografen: Sammlung Siegert, (Edition Braus) [Catalog of an exhibition held at Neue Pinakothek, Munich, May 4-Sept. 11, 2005] 
      
  8. Λ For Giorgio Sommer - P. Baum, 1985, Giorgio Sommer (1834-1914): Photographien aus Italien, (Neue Galerie der Stadt Linz) [Exhibition catalogue]; Giovanni Fanelli, 2007, L’Italia virata all’oro. Attraverso le fotografie di Giorgio Sommer, (Firenze: Pagliai Polistampa); Giovanni Fanelli, 2010, ‘Addenda a Giorgio Sommer‘, Critica d’Arte, vol. Anno LXXII, no. Luglio-Dicembre, 43-43; M. Miraglia,1996, ‘Giorgio, Sommer’s Italian Journey. Between Tradition and the Popular Image‘, History of Photography, vol. 20, no. 1; M. Miraglia (ed.); M. Piantanida; U. Pohlmann & D. Siegert, 1992, Giorgio Sommer in Italien. Fotografien 1857-1888, (Heidelberg: Edition Braus) [Exhibition catalogue]; D. Palazzoli, 1981, Giorgio Sommer fotografo a Napoli, (Milano: Electa); A.D. Weinberg, 1981, The Photography of Giorgio Sommer, (New York, Rochester) [Exhibition catalogue] 
      
  9. Λ For James Robertson - n.d., James Robertson: Photographer of Istanbul, (London: The British Council); B.A. Henisch & H.K. Henisch, 1990, January-March, ‘James Robertson of Constantinople: A Chronology‘, History of Photography, vol. 14, pp. 23-32; Bahattin Oztuncay, 1992, James Robertson: Pioneer of Photography in The Ottoman Empire, (Istanbul: Eran) 
      
  10. Λ Andrew Williamson, 1998, The Golden Age of Travel: The Romantic Years of Tourism in Images from the Thomas Cook Archives, (Thomas Cook); Robert Ingle, 1991 Thomas Cook of Leicester, (Bangor: Headstart History) 
      
  11. Λ Thomas Cook - Wikipedia
    (Accessed: 23 July 2013)
    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Cook 
      
  12. Λ For illustrations of railways - Jim Harter, 2005, World Railways of the Nineteenth Century: A Pictorial History in Victorian Engravings, (JHU Press) 
      
  13. Λ Michael G. Mulhall (ed.), 1899, The Dictionary of Statistics, 4th edition, (London: George Routledge & Sons), p. 507. Cited in Richard F. Selcer, 2006, Civil War America, 1850 To 1875, (Infobase Publishing), p. 107 
      
  14. Λ Michael G. Mulhall (ed.), 1899, The Dictionary of Statistics, 4th edition, (London: George Routledge & Sons), p. 507. Cited in Richard F. Selcer, 2006, Civil War America, 1850 To 1875, (Infobase Publishing), p. 109 
      
  15. Λ Carroll L.V. Meeks, 1956, The Railway Station. An Architectural History, (New Haven: Yale University Press); Jeffrey Richards & John M. MacKenzie, 1986, The Railway Station. A Social History, (Oxford: Oxford University Press) 
      
  16. Λ Tipped-in - ILAB: International League of Antiquarian Booksellers
    (Accessed: 7 November 2013)
    www.ilab.org/eng/glossary/557-tipped-in.html
    Attached to, but not integral to the binding of the book. We usually use this term to indicate something that has been added: a letter from the author, a newspaper or magazine review or obituary, etc. The nature of what is tipped-in will determine whether this addition will enhance or devalue the book.
     
      
  17. Λ Early research on stereoviews was largely carried out by collectors such as William Culp Darrah and T.K. Treadwell - William Culp Darrah, 1964, Stereo Views: A History of Stereographs in America and Their Collection, (Gettysburg, PA: Times and News Publishing Co.); William Culp Darrah, 1977, The World of Stereographs, (Gettysburg, Pa.: William C. Darrah); T.K. Treadwell & William C. Darrah, 1994, Stereographers of the World. Vol. 1: Foreign; vol. 2: United States, (National Stereoscopic Association); John S. Waldsmith, 2002, Stereo Views: An Illustrated History and Price Guide, (Iola, WI: Gazelle) 
      
  18. Λ Pierre Bonnard, "Ker-Xavier Roussel and Edouard Vuillard, Venice", 1899, Sepia-toned gelatin silver print from original negative, 1 1/2 x 2 ins (negative), Musée d'Orsay, Gift of the children of Charles Terrasse, 1992. © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris. 
      
  19. Λ Grand Duke Alexei Alexandrovich of Russia - Wikipedia - Useful for contemporary sources.
    (Accessed: 15 February 2014))
    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Duke_Alexei_Alexandrovich_of_Russia 
      
  20. Λ I would imagine that there are accounts in Russian of the travels of Grand Duke Alexei Alexandrovich and presumably photograph albums. If anybody knows the source of such material I would be most grateful - alan@luminous-lint.com 
      
  21. Λ In the 1840s it was the Hotel des Anglais (English Hotel) and was renamed in 1860 Shepheard's Hotel, after its owner Samuel Shepheard (1816–66).
     
    Nina Nelson, 1960, Shepheard's Hotel, (London: Barrie & Rockliff); Nina Nelson, 1992, Helnan Shepheard Hotel Cairo-Egypt, (Cairo: Al-Ahram, 1992); Andrew Humphreys, 2011, Grand Hotels of Egypt in the Golden Age of Travel, (American University in Cairo Press)
     
    Grand Hotels of Egypt
    (Accessed: 14 April 2014)
    grandhotelsegypt.com 
      
  22. Λ The BBC (UK) ran a television series on Albert Kahn with an accompanying book - David Okuefuna, 2008, The Wonderful World of Albert Kahn: Colour Photographs from a Lost Age, (BBC Books in association with the Musée Albert-Kahn, département des Hauts-de-Seine, France)
     
    The original BBC series shown in 2007 consisted of the following episodes:
     
    A Vision of the World
    1/5 Documentary about the world's first colour camera system from 1908.
    First broadcast: 19 Apr 2007
     
    Men of the World
    2/5 Kahn's global circumnavigation and Stephane Passet's 1913 journey to China and India.
    First broadcast: 26 Apr 2007
     
    Europe on the Brink
    3/5 When Auguste Leon visited Scandinavia in 1910, he found widespread deprivation and famine.
    First broadcast: 03 May 2007
     
    The Soldiers' Story
    4/5 During the First World War, Kahn dispatched his photographers to the French battlefields.
    First broadcast: 09 Sep 2008
     
    The Civilians' Story
    5/5 Tracing the work of Kahn's photographers throughout France during the Great War.
    First broadcast: 17 May 2007 
      
  23. Λ The colour process used by the photographers of Albert Kahn was the Autochrome. 
      
  24. Λ The photographers Albert Kahn commissioned included: Stéphane Passet, Roger Dumas, Alfred Dutertre, Frédéric Gadmer, Lucien Le Saint, Auguste Léon, Léon Busy, Paul Castelnau, Camille Sauvageot and Georges Chevalier. 
      
  25. Λ The Albert Kahn collection is archived at:
     
    albert-kahn.hauts-de-seine.net/english/
    Albert Kahn, museum and gardens
    10-14, rue du Port
    92100 Boulogne-Billancourt
    France
     
    Tel: (33) 1 55 19 28 00
    museealbertkahn@cg92.fr 
      
  26. Λ Robert Macpherson, 1863, Vatican Sculptures, Selected and Arranged in the Order in which they are Found in the Galleries, (London: Chapman & Hall)
     
    Pietro Becchetti & Carlo Pietrangeli, 1987, Robert Macpherson: Un inglese fotografo a Roma, (Rome: Quasar Editions); Alistair Crawford, 1999, ‘Robert Macpherson 1814-72, The Foremost Photographer of Rome‘, Papers of the British School at Rome, vol. 67, pp. 353-403; Alistair Crawford, 2008, ‘Robert Macpherson 1814-1872: The Final Proof‘, in Jubilee - 30 Years ESHPh; Congress of Photography in Vienna; Ray McKenzie, 1996, Spring, ‘Scottish Photographers in Nineteenth-century Italy. Robert Macpherson and his Contemporaries‘, History of Photography, vol. 20, pp. 33-40; Marjorie Munsterburg, 1986, March, ‘A Biographical Sketch of Robert Macpherson‘, The Art Bulletin, vol. 68, no. 1; David Wooters, 1996, Spring, ‘The Quiet Art of Robert Macpherson: An Explication‘, History of Photography, vol. 20, pp. 2-3 
      
  27. Λ Dorothea Ritter & Dietmar Siegert, 2005, Rome 1846-1870 James Anderson und die Maler-Fotografen: Sammlung Siegert, (Edition Braus) [Catalog of an exhibition held at Neue Pinakothek, Munich, May 4-Sept. 11, 2005.] 
      
  28. Λ P. Baum, 1985, Giorgio Sommer (1834-1914): Photographien aus Italien, (Neue Galerie der Stadt Linz) [Exhibition catalogue]; G. Fanelli, 2007, L’Italia virata all’oro. Attraverso le fotografie di Giorgio Sommer, (Firenze: Pagliai Polistampa); G. Fanelli, 2010, ‘Addenda a Giorgio Sommer‘, Critica d’Arte, vol. Anno LXXII, no. Luglio-Dicembre, 43-43; M. Miraglia,1996, ‘Giorgio, Sommer’s Italian Journey. Between Tradition and the Popular Image‘, History of Photography, vol. 20, no. 1; M. Miraglia (ed.), M. Piantanida, U. Pohlmann & D. Siegert, 1992, Giorgio Sommer in Italien. Fotografien 1857-1888, (Heidelberg: Edition Braus) [Exhibition catalogue]; D. Palazzoli, 1981, Giorgio Sommer fotografo a Napoli, (Milano: Electa); A.D. Weinberg, 1981, The Photography of Giorgio Sommer, (New York, Rochester) [Exhibition catalogue] 
      
  29. Λ Jack Ellis Haynes, 1916, Haynes Guide - The Complete Handbook: Yellowstone National Park, (Saint Paul: J.E. Haynes) [30th edition] 
      
  30. Λ Lee Fontanella, 1999, Clifford en Espana: Un Fotografo en la Corte de Isabel II, (Madrid: Ediciones El Viso) 
      
  31. Λ The originals of this series by Auguste Lesouëf in the Bibliothèque nationale de France. 
      
  32. Λ The London Stereoscopic Company, Alphonse Bernoud, Lawrence & Houseworth, Giacomo Brogi and the Soule Photograph Company all printed catalogues and no doubt there were a great many more. 
      
  33. Λ Thomas Houseworth in the USA and Giocomo Brogi in Italy each had prints that showed a selection of their images. 
      
  34. Λ I know of no studies of the inventories or economics of nineteenth century printshops and if you have details I'd be most interested - alan@luminous-lint.com 
      
  35. Λ Elvira Ofenbach, 1997, Josef Spithover: Ein westfalischer Buchhandler, Kunsthandler und Mazen im Rom des 19. Jahrhunderts, (Schnell & Steiner) 
      
  36. Λ Spithover in Piazza di Spagna, Rome, is mentioned in guidebooks including - John Murray, 1953, A Handbook for Travellers in Central Italy. Part II. Rome and its environs, (J. Murray), Third edition, p. 6 
      
  37. Λ Augustus John Cuthbert Hare, 1875, Walks in Rome, (Daldy, Isbister & Company), vol. 1, p. 29 
      
  38. Λ Dorothea Ritter & Dietmar Siegert, 2005, Rome 1846-1870 James Anderson und die Maler-Fotografen: Sammlung Siegert, (Edition Braus) [Catalog of an exhibition held at Neue Pinakothek, Munich, May 4-Sept. 11, 2005.] 
      
  39. Λ John Murray, A Handbook of Rome and its Environs, Seventh edition, (London: John Murray, 1864), pp. xxii-xxiii. 
      
  40. Λ Herbert Warren Wind, 22 September 1975, "The House of Baedeker", The New Yorker
    www.newyorker.com/archive/1975/09/22/1975_09_22_042_TNY_CARDS_000316883
    [Subscription required] 
      
  41. Λ Karl Baedeker (firm), 1876, Palestine and Syria. Handbook for Travellers (Leipsic: Karl Baedeker), p. 439 
      
  42. Λ Karl Baedeker (firm), 1876, Palestine and Syria. Handbook for Travellers (Leipsic: Karl Baedeker), p. 145 
      
  43. Λ Karl Baedeker (firm), 1878, Egypt. Handbook for Travellers. Part First: Lower Egypt, with the Fayum and the Peninsula of Sinai (Leipsic: Karl Baedeker), pp. 234-235 
      
  44. Λ Karl Baedeker (firm), 1885, London and its Environs: Including Excursions to Brighton, the Isle of Wight, etc. Handbook for Travellers. (Leipsic: Karl Baedeker), p. 22 
      
  45. Λ Karl Baedeker (firm), 1886, Italy. Handbook for Travellers. First part: Northern Italy (Leipsic: Karl Baedeker), p. 376 
      
  46. Λ Karl Baedeker (firm), 1886, Italy. Handbook for Travellers. First part: Northern Italy (Leipsic: Karl Baedeker), p. 234 
      
  47. Λ I have not come across a good book on wallets containing minature views or any articles. If you have done research in this area or know of any I would be most grateful - alan@luminous-lint.com 
      
  48. Λ  Charles Philipon; Auguste Auvial; Paul de La Garenne; Victor Ratier; Jean Baptiste Arnout; et al, 1840, Paris et ses environs : reproduits par le daguerre´otype, ( Paris : Chez Aubert et cie., e´diteurs, marchands d'estampes et imprimeurs - Paris : Imprime´ par Be´thune et Plon) 
      
  49. Λ Included on "Books illustrated with lithographs or engravings after daguerreotypes or with prints from etched daguerreotypes" in Helmut and Alison Gernsheim, 1956, L.J.M. Daguerre (1787-1851), (Cleveland: World Pub. Co.), p. 190.
     
    For a useful list of early publications that used, or purportedly used, daguerreotypes see - Beaumont Newhall & Robert Doty, 1962, "The Value of Photography to the Artist, 1839", Image (George Eastman House), vol. 11, no. 6, pp. 25-28 
      
  50. Λ Noël Marie Paymal Lerebours, 1842, Excursions daguerriennes: Vues et monuments les plus remarquables du globe (A Paris: Chez Rittner et Goupil, Boulevard Montmartre, 15; Lerebours, Opticien de l'Observatoire, Place du Pont-Neuf, 13; Hr Bossange, Quai Voltaire, 11). 
      
  51. Λ 1841, The Civil Engineer and Architect's Journal, vol. 4, p. 63 
      
  52. Λ Adolphe Duperly, 1840, Daguerian Excursions in Jamaica being A Collection of Views of the most Striking Scenery, public Buildings and other interesting objects, (A. Duperly)
     
    There is a copy in the British Library. 
      
  53. Λ The date of this publication is uncertain and the date of 1844 is given by - Frank Cundall, (1902), Bibliographia Jamaicensis. A list of Jamaica books and pamphlets, magazine articles, newspapers, and maps, most of which are in the library of the Institute of Jamaica, (Kingston: Institute of Jamaica) 
      
  54. Λ Roger Fenton is the best known of Crimean War photographers and there is a considerable amount written about him - Gordon Baldwin et al., 2004, All the Mighty World: The Photographs of Roger Fenton, 1852–1860, (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press; New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art); Helmut & Alison Gernsheim, 1954, Roger Fenton: Photographer of the Crimean War, (London: Secker & Warburg); John Hannavy, 1975, Fenton of Crimble Hall, (Boston: David R. Godine); Valerie Lloyd, 1988, Roger Fenton: Photographer of the 1850s, (London: South Bank Board); Richard Pare, 1987, Roger Fenton, (New York: Aperture).
     
    For a rephotographic study - David R. Jones, 2012, In the Footsteps of Roger Fenton, Crimean War Photographer, (www.lulu.com: self-published) 
      
  55. Λ Roger Fenton, 1860, The Conway in the Stereoscope, (London: Lowell Reeve) 
      
  56. Λ Tipped-in - ILAB: International League of Antiquarian Booksellers
    (Accessed: 7 November 2013)
    www.ilab.org/eng/glossary/557-tipped-in.html
    Attached to, but not integral to the binding of the book. We usually use this term to indicate something that has been added: a letter from the author, a newspaper or magazine review or obituary, etc. The nature of what is tipped-in will determine whether this addition will enhance or devalue the book.
     
      
  57. Λ C. Piazzi Smyth, 1858, Teneriffe - An Astronomer's Experiment, (Lowell Reeve) 
      
  58. Λ Emmanuel-Guillaume Rey wrote on military fortifications and architecture with his books including - E.G. Rey, 1871, Etude sur les monuments de l'architecture militaire des croise´s en Syrie et dans l'i^le de Chypre, (Paris: Impr. nationale) 
      
  59. Λ Louis de Clerq, 1860, Voyage en Orient 1859-1860, villes, monuments et vues pittoresques [Six volumes with 222 calotypes] 
      
  60. Λ Quotations are taken from - Bill Jay "Royal Command - Francis Bedford's photographs of the educational tour of the Middle East by the Prince of Wales, 1862"
    (Accessed: 11 November 2013)
    www.billjayonphotography.com/Royal%20Command-%20Francis%20Bedford.pdf 
      
  61. Λ Francis Bedford, 1863, Photographic Pictures Made By Mr. Francis Bedford During the Tour in the East in which, by command, he accompanied His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales, (London: Day & Son)
     
    W.M. Thompson & Francis Bedford, 1860s, The Holy Land, Egypt, Constantinople, Athens: a series of forty-eight photographs, (London: Day) [Text and introduction by W.M. Thompson, photographs by Francis Bedford]
     
    See also - Badr El-Hage & Sophie Gordon, 2012, The Middle East in early photographs: Francis Bedford's royal tour of 1862, (London: Royal Collection); Sophie Gordon; John McCarthy & Badr El-Hage, 2013, Cairo to Constantinople: Francis Bedford's Photographs of the Middle East, (Royal Collection Publications) 
      
  62. Λ For Francis Bedford - Francis Bedford, 1863, Photographic Pictures Made By Mr. Francis Bedford During the Tour in the East in which, by command, he accompanied His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales, (London: Day & Son); W.M. Thompson & Francis Bedford, 1860s, The Holy Land, Egypt, Constantinople, Athens: a series of forty-eight photographs, (London: Day) [Text and introduction by W.M. Thompson, photographs by Francis Bedford]; Linda Wheatley-Irving, 2007, Summer, ‘Holy Land Photographs and Their Words: Francis Bedford and the 'Tour in the East'‘, Jerusalem Quarterly, vol. 31, pp. 79-96; Sophie Gordon, John McCarthy & Badr El-Hage, 2013, Cairo to Constantinople: Francis Bedford's Photographs of the Middle East, (Royal Collection Publications) 
      
  63. Λ Edward Bierstadt, Improvement in stereoscopes (US Patent: US174893 A, filed: 17 Nov 1875, published: 21 Mar 1876) 
      
  64. Λ Edward Bierstadt, [1878], Gems of American Scenery, consisting of Stereocopic Views among the White Mountains. With descriptive text. Illustrations by the Artotype Process, (New York: Harroun & Bierstadt) 
      
  65. Λ From Henry Fox Talbot's "Brief Historical Sketch of the Invention of the Art" in The Pencil of Nature, (Longman, Brown, Green and Longmans, London) 
      
  66. Λ It is a personal observation but I find the daguerreotypes of Choiselat & Ratel (Charles-Marie-Isidore Choiselat and Stanislas Ratel) taken in the 1840s to be amongst of the finest landscapes ever taken. 
      
  67. Λ Roger Fenton, 1860, The Conway in the Stereoscope: illustrated by Roger Fenton, with Notes, Descriptive and Historical by James Bridge Davidson, (London: Lovell Reeve) 
      
  68. Λ William Despard Hemphill, 1860, The Abbeys, Castles, and Scenery of Clonmel and the Surrounding Countryside (Privately printed) 
      
  69. Λ Edward Bierstadt, 1878, Gems of American Scenery, consisting of Stereocopic Views among the White Mountains, (New York: Harroun & Bierstadt) 
      
  70. Λ For stereoviews - William Culp Darrah, 1964, Stereo Views: A History of Stereographs in America and Their Collection, (Gettysburg, PA: Times and News Publishing Co.); William Culp Darrah, 1977, The World of Stereographs, (Gettysburg, Pa.: William C. Darrah); T.K. Treadwell & William C. Darrah, 1994, Stereographers of the World. Vol. 1: Foreign; vol. 2: United States, (National Stereoscopic Association); John Waldsmith, 2002, Stereo Views: An Illustrated History and Price Guide, (Iola, WI: Gazelle) 
      
  71. Λ For writings by Sir David Brewster - David Brewster, 1856, The Stereoscope: Its History, Theory, and Construction, (London: John Murray); Sir David Brewster, 1870, The Stereoscope: Its History, Theory and Construction, (London: John Camden Hotton) 
      
  72. Λ For Oliver Wendell Holmes - Oliver Wendell Holmes, 1861, July, ‘Sun-Painting and Sun-Sculpture; With a Stereoscopic Trip Across the Atlantic‘, Atlantic Monthly, pp. 13-29 
      
  73. Λ Biography of Charles Piazzi Smyth - Hermann Alexander Brück & Mary T. Brück, 1988, The Peripatetic Astronomer: The Life of Charles Piazzi Smyth, (Bristol: Adam Hilger); Roger Taylor & Larry J. Schaaf, 2007, Impressed by Light: British Photographs from Paper Negatives, 1840-1860 (New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art)
     
    Work on Teneriffe - Larry Schaaf, 1980, ‘Piazzi Smyth at Tenerife: Part 1: The Expedition and the Resulting Book‘, History of Photography, vol. 4, no. 4, pp. 289-307; Larry Schaaf, 1981, ‘Piazzi Smyth at Tenerife: Part 2: Photography and the Disciples of Constable and Harding‘, History of Photography, vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 27-50
     
    His book which included stereographic photographs - C. Piazzi Smyth, 1858, Teneriffe - An Astronomer's Experiment, (Lowell Reeve) 
      
  74. Λ Roger Fenton, 1860, The Conway in the Stereoscope: illustrated by Roger Fenton, with Notes, Descriptive and Historical by James Bridge Davidson, (London: Lovell Reeve) 
      
  75. Λ William Despard Hemphill, 1860, The Abbeys, Castles, and Scenery of Clonmel and the Surrounding Countryside (Privately printed) 
      
  76. Λ Edward Bierstadt, 1878, Gems of American Scenery, consisting of Stereocopic Views among the White Mountains, (New York: Harroun & Bierstadt) 
      
  77. Λ The Keystone View Company purchased a large portion of the Underwood & Underwood photographs in 1920. 
      
  78. Λ The Keystone-Mast Collection (1870-1963) is housed at University of California Riverside and is part of the California Museum of Photography. The collection consists of 250,000 stereoscopic glass-plate and film negatives and 100,000 vintage prints.
    (Accessed: 3 December 2013)
    www.oac.cdlib.org/items/ark:/13030/ft1q2n999m 
      
  79. Λ The University of Washington provides the following information on the Kilburn Brothers - B.W. Kilburn & Co. was started in Littleton, New Hampshire in 1876, by the Kilburn Brothers, Benjamin West and Edward Kilburn, and became one of the major publishers of sterographs at the turn of the century. After B.W. Kilburns demise in 1909, the entire set of Kilburn negatives were acquired by the Keystone View Co.
    (Accessed: 3 December 2013)
     
      
  80. Λ George Anson, A Voyage Round the World, in the Years 1740, 41, 42, 43, 44 (W. Smith), p. 10 
      
  81. Λ Henry Edward Fan, 1842, Five Years in India (London: Henry Colburn), p. 291 
      
  82. Λ Sir John Gardner Wilkinson, 1858, Murrays - A Handbook for Travellers in Egypt (London: John Murray), p. 166 
      
  83. Λ First edition - Jules Verne, 1873, Around the World in Eighty Days, (Paris: Pierre-Jules Hetzel & Cie) 
      
  84. Λ Nelly Bly, 2009, Around the World in Seventy-Two Days, (Wildside Press) [Reprint] 
      
  85. Λ There are multiple versions of books by Francis Frith and as they included tipped-in plates the illustrations can vary between copies. Some of the books are undated making a full listing with dates a challenge. If you have a listing I'd be most grateful - alan@luminous-lint.com 
      
  86. Λ The two editions of the Holy Bible illustrated with photographs by Francis Frith are:
    1860 - E. Eyre & W. Spottiswoode
    1862-1863 - Glasgow: W. Mackenzie 
      
  87. Λ Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, 1865, Hyperion, (London) [Third edition. Illustrated with twenty-four photographs of the Rhine, Switzerland, and the Tyrol, by F. Frith.] 
      
  88. Λ Mark Twain, 1880, A Tramp Abroad, Third edition, (London: Chatto & Windus), vol. II, p. 100 
      
  89. Λ Giovanni Fanelli, 2004, L’immagine di Pisa nell’opera di Enrico Van Lint pioniere della fotografia, (Firenze: Pagliai Polistampa) 
      
  90. Λ Each view is mounted on boudoir-size card (5.25 x 8.5 inches) with reverse imprint for "Alaska Views ... Photographed and Published by F. Jay Hayes & Bro., Official Photographers N.P.R.R. 392 Jackson St., Cor. 6th, St. Paul, Minn. Yellowstone Park and Northern Pacific Views." along with a list of views in the series. The print size is 5 x 8.25 inches (13 x 21 cm). 
      
  91. Λ Text courtesy of Michael G. Jacob, Spoleto, Italy 
      
  92. Λ For more on the photographic diary of Clara Whitcomb and many others see - Barbara Levine & Kirsten Jensen, 2007, Around the World: The Grand Tour in Photo Albums, (Princeton Architectural Press) 
      
  93. Λ Jacques-Henri Lartigue, 1966, Boyhood Photos of J. H. Lartigue: The Family Album of a Gilded Age, (Lausanne, Switzerland: Ami Guichard); Martine D’Astier, Quentin Bajac & Alain Saya, 2003, Lartigue: Album of a Century, (New York: Harry N. Abrams) 
      
  94. Λ For the Autochrome archives of Albert Kahn - David Okuefuna, 2008, Albert Kahn: Le monde en couleurs Autochromes 1908-1931, (Chne) [French]; David Okuefuna, 2008, The Dawn of the Color Photograph: Albert Kahn's Archives of the Planet, (Princeton University Press); David Okuefuna, 2008, The Wonderful World of Albert Kahn: Colour Photographs from a Lost Age, (BBC Books). There was also an excellent BBC multi-part TV series, The Wonderful World Of Albert Kahn (DVD Release date: 7 Sept 2009) 
      

alan@luminous-lint.com

 
  

HomeContents > Further research

 
  
Thumbnail Thumbnail Thumbnail Thumbnail Thumbnail Thumbnail Thumbnail Thumbnail Thumbnail Thumbnail Thumbnail Thumbnail Thumbnail Thumbnail Thumbnail  
  
General reading 
  
1893, The United States of America: One Hundred Albertype Illustrations, (New York: A. Wittemann) [Δ
  
Aker, Julide, 2000, Sight-seeing: Photography of the Middle East and its Audiences, 1840-1940, (Cambridge: Harvard University Art Museums Gallery Series, Niumber 30) [Δ
  
Armstrong, Carol, 1998, Scenes in a Library: Reading the Photograph in the Book, 1843-1875, (The MIT Press) [Δ
  
Beveridge, Erskine, 1922, Wanderings with a Camera 1882-1898, (Edinburgh: Privately printed) [Δ
  
Blottiere, Alain, 2009, Vintage Egypt: Cruising the Nile in the Golden Age of Travel, (Flammarion) isbn-10: 2080301136 isbn-13: 978-2080301130 [Revised edition] [Δ
  
Boisjoly, François & Badot, Jean-Christophe, 2014, Répertoire des photographes français d'outre-mer du XIXe siècle, (Paris: Héritage Architectural) isbn-13: 978-2915096156 [Δ
  
Bryden, Henry Anderson, 1893, Gun and Camera in Southern Africa ... With numerous illustrations and a map, (London: Edward Stanford) [Δ
  
Fabian, Rainer & Adam, Hans Christian, 1983, Masters of Early Travel Photography, (New York: Vendome Press) [Δ
  
Fanelli, Giovanni & Mazza, Barbara, 2013, Italie - Le Grand Tour: Dans le Miroir de la Photographie au XiXe Siècle, (Nicolas Chaudun) isbn-10: 2350391620 isbn-13: 978-2350391625 [French] [Δ
  
Foster, Sheila;, Heiting, Manfred & Stuhlman, Rachel (eds.), 2007, Imagining Paradise: The Richard and Ronay Menschel Library at The George Eastman House, (Rochester. Göttingen, Germany and London: Steidl) [Δ
  
Hastings, C[harles] W. (ed.), 1891, Holidays with the Camera ... With ... illustrations, and an appendix containing a complete list of contributors, titles of their photographs, and ... criticism, (London: Hazell & Watson) [Δ
  
Hershkowitz, R., 1980, The British Photographer Abroad. The First Thirty Years, (London: Robert Hershkowitz Ltd) [Δ
  
Howe, K.S., 1993, Excursions Along The Nile: The Photographic Discovery Of Ancient Egypt, (Santa Barbara: Santa Barbara Museum Of Art) isbn-10: 0899510892 isbn-13: 978-0899510897 [Δ
  
Howe, K.S., 1997, Revealing The Holy Land. The Photographic Exploration Of Palestine, (Santa Barbara: Santa Barbara Museum Of Art) [Δ
  
Howe, K.S., 2004, First Seen. Portraits Of The World's Peoples 1840-1880 From The Wilson Centre For Photography, (London: Santa Barbara Museum of Art; Third Millennium Publishing) [Δ
  
Jacobson, K., 2007, Odalisques & Arabesques: Orientalist Photography 1839-1925, (London: Quaritch) isbn-10: 095508525X isbn-13: 9780955085253 [Δ
  
Krauss, Rolf E., 1979, ‘Travel Reports and Photography in Early Photographically Illustrated Books‘, History of Photography, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 15-30 [Δ
  
Micklewright, Nancy, 2003, A Victorian Traveler in the Middle East: The Photography and Travel Writing of Annie Lady Brassey, (Ashgate Pub Ltd) isbn-10: 0754632024 isbn-13: 978-0754632023 [Δ
  
Okuefuna, David, 2008, The Dawn of the Color Photograph: Albert Kahn's Archives of the Planet, (Princeton University Press) isbn-13: 978-0691139074 [Δ
  
Onne, Eyal, 1980, Photographic Heritage of the Holy Land 1839-1914, (Institute of Advanced Studies Manchester Polytechnic) isbn-10: 0905252101 isbn-13: 978-0905252100 [Δ
  
Steele, Thomas Sedgwick, 1880, Canoe and Camera: a two hundred mile tour through the Maine forests ... With illustrations, (New York: Orange Judd Co.) [Δ
  
Taylor, John, 1992, ‘Aristocrats of Anthropology: A Study of P. H. Emerson and Other Tourists of the Norfolk Broads‘, Image, vol. 35, no. 1/2, pp. 3-24 [Δ
  
Thomson, John, 1907, ‘Geographical Photography‘, Scottish Geographical Magazine, vol. 23, no. 1, p. 17 [Δ
  
Vaczek, L & Buckland, G, 1981, Travelers In Ancient Lands: A Portrait Of The Middle East, 1839-1919, (Boston: New York Graphic Society) [Δ
  
Verne, Jules, 1873, Around the World in Eighty Days, (Paris: Pierre-Jules Hetzel & Cie) [Δ
  
Verne, Jules, 1898, Superb Orénoque, (Collection Hetzel) [Δ
  
Woodbury, Walter Bentley (ed.), 1875, Treasure spots of the world: A selection of the chief beauties and wonders of nature and art, (London: London: Ward, Lock, and Tyler) [Illustrated with 28 high-quality photo-mechanical prints created by the Woodburytype type process] [Δ
  
 
  
Readings on, or by, individual photographers 
  
Francis Bedford 
  
Badr El-Hage & Gordon, Sophie, 2012, The Middle East in early photographs: Francis Bedford's royal tour of 1862, (London: Royal Collection) [Δ
  
Bedford, Francis, 1863, Photographic Pictures Made By Mr. Francis Bedford During the Tour in the East in which, by command, he accompanied His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales, (London: Day & Son) [Δ
  
Gordon, Sophie; McCarthy, John & El-Hage, Badr, 2013, Cairo to Constantinople: Francis Bedford's Photographs of the Middle East, (Royal Collection Publications) isbn-10: 1905686188 isbn-13: 978-1905686186 [Δ
  
Thompson, W.M. & Bedford, Francis, 1860s, The Holy Land, Egypt, Constantinople, Athens: a series of forty-eight photographs, (London: Day) [Text and introduction by W.M. Thompson, photographs by Francis Bedford] [Δ
  
Wheatley-Irving, Linda, 2007, Summer, ‘Holy Land Photographs and Their Words: Francis Bedford and the 'Tour in the East'‘, Jerusalem Quarterly, vol. 31, pp. 79-96 [Δ
  
Samuel Bourne 
  
Rayner, Hugh (ed.), 2009, Photographic Journeys in the Himalayas 1863-1866 Samuel Bourne, (Pagoda Press) isbn-13: 978-1904289647 [Δ
  
Louis de Clercq 
  
de Clerq, Louis, 1860, Voyage en Orient 1859-1860, villes, monuments et vues pittoresques [Six volumes with 222 calotypes] [Δ
  
Édouard Delessert 
  
Delessert, Édouard, 1854, Ile de Sardaigne: Cagliari et Sassari, 40 Vues Photographiques, (Goupil) [Δ
  
Roger Fenton 
  
Fenton, Roger, 1860, The Conway in the Stereoscope: illustrated by Roger Fenton, with Notes, Descriptive and Historical by James Bridge Davidson, (London: Lovell Reeve) [Δ
  
Francis Frith 
  
Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth, 1865, Hyperion, (London) [Third edition. Illustrated with twenty-four photographs of the Rhine, Switzerland, and the Tyrol, by F. Frith.] [Δ
  
Arnold Genthe 
  
Genthe, Arnold & Tchen, John Kuo Wei, 1984, Genthe's Photographs of San Francisco's Old Chinatown, (Dover Publications) isbn-10: 0486245926 isbn-13: 978-0486245928 [Δ
  
Joseph-Philibert Girault de Prangey 
  
1998, Girault de Prangey (1804-1892): dessins, peintures, photographies, études historiques, (Langres: Musées de Langres / D. Guéniot) [Exhibition catalogue] [Δ
  
2003, 20 May, Important Daguerreotypes by Joseph-Philbert Girault De Prangey from the Archive of the Artist - Part I - Christie's London, (London: Christies) [Δ
  
2004, 18 May, Important Daguerreotypes by Joseph-Philbert Girault De Prangey from the Archive of the Artist - Part II - Christie's London, (London: Christies) [Δ
  
Burton Holmes 
  
Barber, X. Theodore, 1993, March, ‘The Roots of Travel Cinema: John L. Stoddard, E. Burton Holmes and the Nineteenth-Century Illustrated Travel Lecture‘, Film History, vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 68-84 [Δ
  
J. Payne Jennings 
  
Cotterell, Constance, 1895, Summer Holidays in North East England. Illustrated with photographs by Payne Jennings, etc., (London: Walter Scott) [Δ
  
Jennings, Payne, 1875, The English Lakes, ([London?]) [Δ
  
Jennings, Payne, 1897, Photo Pictures in East Anglia by Payne Jennings. With descriptive letterpress by A. Berlyn, (Ashtead: Art Photo Works) [Δ
  
Jennings, Payne, 1897, Sun Pictures of the Norfolk Boards: . One Hundred Photographs from Nature of the Rivers and Broads of Norfolk and Suffolk, (Ashtead: Art Photo Works) [With letterpress description by E. R. Suffling] [Δ
  
John Shaw Smith 
  
Pelizzari, Maria Antonella, 2000, ‘The Inclusive Map of John Shaw Smith’s 1850-1852 Photographic Tour‘, Visual Resources, vol. 16, pp. 351-75 [Δ
  
John Lawson Stoddard 
  
Taylor, Daniel Crane, 1935, John L Stoddard: traveller, lecturer, litterateur, (New York: P. J. Kennedy & Sons) [Δ
  
Claudius Galen Wheelhouse 
  
Wheelhouse, Claudius Galen & El-Hage, Badr (ed.), 2006, Narrative of a Yacht Voyage in the Mediterranean, 1849/1850, (London: Folios) isbn-13: 978-1901059458 [Δ
  
 
  
If you feel this list is missing a significant book or article please let me know - Alan - alan@luminous-lint.com 
  

HomeContentsPhotographers > Photographers worth investigating

 
Louis de Clercq  (1836-1901) • Francis Frith  (1822-1898) • Burton Holmes  (1870-1958) • J. Payne Jennings  (check) • John Shaw Smith  (1811-1873) • John Lawson Stoddard  (1850-1931) • Wilfred Thesiger  (1910-2003) • John Thomson  (1837-1921)
HomeThemes > Travel 
 
A wider gazeRelated topics 
  
Albums 
Dark tents and dark boxes 
Expeditions and exploration 
Pack animals - mules, donkeys, burros and horses 
Snapshots 
Transportation 
 
  

HomeContentsOnline exhibitions > Travel

Please submit suggestions for Online Exhibitions that will enhance this theme.
Alan - alan@luminous-lint.com

 
  
Thumbnail19th Century Photograph Album covers 
Title | Lightbox | Checklist
Released (November 6, 2010) A preliminary reference set.
 
Currently seeking examples of unusual photograph albums.
ThumbnailAround the World: The Grand Tour in Photo Albums 
Title | Lightbox | Checklist
Released (November 23, 2007)
ThumbnailAutochromes: From around the world 
Title | Lightbox | Checklist
Released (May 1, 2006)
ThumbnailCarleton Watkins - Spring Valley Water Works 
Title | Lightbox | Checklist
Released (January 29, 2011)
ThumbnailCyanotypes of Florence, Italy 
Title | Lightbox | Checklist
Released (February 10, 2013)
ThumbnailFrancis Bedford: Tour in the East (1862) 
Title | Lightbox | Checklist
Released (August 22, 2012)
ThumbnailFrancis Frith: Sinai, Palestine, The Nile 
Title | Lightbox | Checklist
Released (August 14, 2007)
ThumbnailG.K. Ballance: Travel in Switzerland and Italy 
Title | Lightbox | Checklist
Released (August 14, 2007)
ThumbnailJules Verne: Around the World in Eighty Days - What would Phileas Fogg and Passepartout have seen? 
Title | Lightbox | Checklist
Released (October 17, 2010)
ThumbnailNiagara Falls 
Title | Lightbox | Checklist
Improved (October 22, 2010)
ThumbnailPhotograph album - An Unknown Street Photographer in Paris (1896) 
Title | Lightbox | Checklist
Released (August 6, 2009)
ThumbnailPhotograph album - Bermuda (ca. 1890) 
Title | Lightbox | Checklist
Released (June 13, 2007) Can anybody identify the photographer?
ThumbnailPhotograph album - Fotografias de Montevideo (1880) 
Title | Lightbox | Checklist
Released (March 7, 2007)
ThumbnailPhotograph album - Maj. General Leonard Wood in Cuba (ca. 1899) 
Title | Lightbox | Checklist
Released (April 5, 2007)
ThumbnailSnapshot photography 
Title | Lightbox | Checklist
Released (March 21, 2011)
  
 
  

HomeVisual indexes > Travel

Please submit suggestions for Visual Indexes to enhance this theme.
Alan - alan@luminous-lint.com

 
  
   Photographer 
  
ThumbnailCharles Breed: The Wellcome Photographic Exposure Record and Diary - 1910 - French trip 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailFrancis Bedford: Constantinople (1862) 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailFrancis Bedford: Covers for Tour in the East 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailFrancis Bedford: Egypt (1862) 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailFrancis Bedford: Greece (1862) 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailFrancis Bedford: Lebanon (1862) 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailFrancis Bedford: The Holy Land and Syria (1862) 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailFrancis Bedford: The Prince of Wales and his trip to the East (1862) 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailFrancis Frith: Illustrations for Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's Hyperion (1865) 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailFrancis Frith: Lower Egypt, Thebes and the Pyramids 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailG. Lékégian: Encampment of Beduins 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailJ. Payne Jennings: Book covers 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailJosé Agusto da Cunha Moraes: Africa Occidental Album Photographico 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailJosef Spithover: Book and print seller in Rome 
ThumbnailLamarque (Santiago): Photograph album - Maj. General Leonard Wood in Cuba (ca. 1899) 
ThumbnailLord and Lady Canning Family Album 
ThumbnailLouis de Clercq: Voyage en Orient 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailNoël Marie Paymal Lerebours: Excursions daguerriennes 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailWalter B. Woodbury (ed.): Treasure spots of the world (1875) 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
 
 
  
   Themes 
  
ThumbnailCoventry-rotary, Photo-tricycle, M.D. Rudge and Co. (Great Britain) 
ThumbnailKarl Baedeker's Handbooks for Travellers 
ThumbnailSouvenir sets of travel photographs 
ThumbnailTravel: Popular culture 
ThumbnailTravel: Thomas Cook and his Tours 
 
 
  
   Geography 
  
ThumbnailEgypt: The Pyramids: Climbing 
ThumbnailUSA: California: Yosemite: Visitors 
 
  
   Equipment and supplies 
  
ThumbnailPhotograph albums: Souvenir 
 
 
  
    
  
ThumbnailMobile studios: Railroad photograph cars and studios on trains 
 
 
  
   Techniques 
  
ThumbnailStanhopes 
 
 
  
   Still thinking about these... 
  
ThumbnailAlbum of cyanotypes of Florence, Italy (1880s or later) 
ThumbnailEgypt: Shepheard's Hotel / Hotel Shepherd 
ThumbnailErinnerung an Oberammergau 1890 (Souvenir of Oberammergau 1890) 
ThumbnailJosef Spithover - Libreria Spithover: Stereoviews 
ThumbnailNineteenth century book and print sellers 
ThumbnailRouch's Registered Portable Dark Operating Chamber, for working in open country (1858) 
 
  
Refreshed: 23 April 2014, 23:31
 
  
 
  
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