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HomeContentsThemes > Advertising

Curatorial and planning notes 
  
This theme will also include the subversion of advertising and commercial photography by Andy Warhol and the billboard collaborations of Mike Mandel and Larry Sultan.
 
  
Contents

Advertising and commercial photography
295.01   The distinction between commercial photography and advertising
295.02   Advertising photography
295.03   Advertising that includes photographs
295.04   Photography as an Advertising Medium (1859)
Examples of advertising
295.05   Carte de visites: Advertising for photographers
295.06   Carte de visites: Advertising
295.07   Ranger & Austen: Clairvoyant Medical Examinations - Buffum & Cleveland
295.08   Contemporary uses of carte de visites for employment
295.09   Cabinet cards: Advertising
295.10   Robinson & Roi: The Famous Glass Dress - Royal Robe of Princess Eulalia
295.11   Sutherland sisters
295.12   McDonald: Advertising cabinet cards for the Storm Sign Co., South Bend, Ind.
295.13   I.W. Taber: The Taber photographic album of principal business houses, residences and persons (1880)
295.14   Banner ladies
295.15   Seeking a wife (1881)
295.16   New York facades shown in cabinet cards
295.17   Sports cards and cigarette cards
295.18   Advertising calenders
295.19   Gelatin silver prints: Advertising
Documentation of advertising and marketing initiatives
295.20   Documenting window and shop displays
Photographers
295.21   Margaret Watkins: Advertising
295.22   J. Pécsi: Photo und Publizität - Photo and Advertising (1930)
295.23   Victor Keppler: Advertising
295.24   Lejaren ŕ Hiller: Surgery through the Ages
295.25   Nickolas Muray: Advertising
This theme includes example sections and will be revised and added to as we proceed. Suggestions for additions, improvements and the correction of factual errors are always appreciated.
 
  
Advertising and commercial photography 
  
295.01   Advertising >  The distinction between commercial photography and advertising 
  
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Distinguishing between commercial and advertising photographs is not straightforward and requires contextual understanding such as associated text and logos to confirm that the image was used to advertise a product or service.
 
If we look at the three images by Alfons Himmelreich of a Kidma moveable lift the first is a straight commercial product shot whereas the other two use the same photograph for advertising as the overall context makes clear. 
  
295.02   Advertising >  Advertising photography 
  
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The history of advertising photography is not as well studied as it deserves to be. Part of the difficulty has been that it was largely ignored by the early histories as it was placed in the category of commercial photography which was outside the canon of notable photographers who were used to illustrate the one-volume histories of photography. This has changed over the years as many notable photographers including Edward Steichen, Paul Outerbridge, August Sander, László Moholy-Nagy, Margaret Watkins, Lewis Hine, Herbert Matter, Alfred Cheney Johnston, Richard Avedon and many others have made photographs for advertising.[1] The separation between photographers who spend their lives in commercial photography and the world of the history of photography is dubious indeed and there are many interactions. The superb colour carbro prints of Nickolas Muray[2] for example.
 
Prior to high resolution halftones it was difficult to print photographic advertisements in magazines and books but as the nineteenth century came to a close it was possible.
 
The period from 1890 to 1930 was an interesting one within art and photography as there were considerable shifts taking place with Pictorialism in photography and the rise of abstraction leading into Modernism. The Clarence H. White School of Photography[3] in America is a useful case study for understanding these intersections as some of the students, for example Margaret Bourke-White, Anton Bruehl, Paul Outerbridge and Margaret Watkins bridged the gap between these movements and carried out commercial and advertising assignments using different styles. The distinction between art photography and advertising has plagued the history of photography and excluded a lot of work that is worthy of consideration. 
  
295.03   Advertising >  Advertising that includes photographs 
  
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295.04   Advertising >  Photography as an Advertising Medium (1859) 
  
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There was a realization early on photography could be effectively, or ineffectively, used to promote the sale of an entertainment as this piece from The Photographic News for Amateur Photographers of 1859 noted:
Photography as an Advertising Medium
 
It is not an unusual thing to meet, in the course of one's perambulations, with photography as an advertising medium. It seems to be an especial resort now of showmen and theatrical characters. The great authority on the subject of advertising—Mr. Phineas T. Barnum, with his usual astuteness, has called it into requisition as a means of attracting public attention to his exhibitions. For instance, he is at present exhibiting the renowned Tom Thumb, who created such a furor some years ago. "When this diminutive specimen of humanity was first exhibited he had to be content with lithographic and wood-engraved portraits, showing how little he was when compared to a life-guardsman. But, now that he has again appeared on the public stage, he has his portrait taken from life, alongside of a real life-guardsman. "We have made inquiries as to the result of these photographic advertisements, and we are informed that they much surpass the old method of advertising by lithographs, which, however well executed, left only the impression on the public mind of an ideal; whereas, by having photographs taken, they see the real, knowing full well that in a photograph there is no room for any of those little tricks which the lithographer can so easily put into a lithograph. Mr. Barnum, however, is not the only showman who avails himself of the resources of photography. As we passed St. Martin's Hall, in Long Acre, the other day, our attention was attracted by another photographic advertisement, that of an actor who has some distant resemblance to portraits of Shakespeare, and who, therefore, has taken to the peculiar dress in which Shakespeare was supposed to attire himself, that is, if sculptors render the clothing of the bard correctly when they chisel out a statue. We could not help laughing at the idea, as we inspected the precious picture of a man with a faint resemblance to, and trying very hard to look like, Shakespeare. The model which. he evidently had been studying, was one of those extremely cheap plaster casts, painted black, and slightly bronzed. The picture altogether was what may be termed richly ludicrous. The advantage which we saw in this photographic advertisement was, that it dispelled all those poetic and sentimental ideas which a lithographer would have been certain to have introduced. Mr. and Mrs. Howard Paul, in their entertainment entitled "Patch Work," have also several photographic advertisements, which generally seem to attract attention ; while Mr. W. S. Woodin has had his entertainment put into the stereoscope. Lastly, though not least, we see that Mr. Spurgeon allows himself and his lady to be exhibited in the stereoscope; but whether it is with a similar object to those above alluded to, we are not in a position to say.[4]
 
  
Examples of advertising 
  
295.05   Advertising >  Carte de visites: Advertising for photographers 
  
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André Adolphe-Eugčne Disdéri> (1819-1889)[5] was a French photographer who in November 1854 took out a patent for carte de visite.[6] By affixing albumen prints to cards of a set size he created the first standardized format that was suitable for mass production and dissemination. Carte de visites became a worldwide craze from the 1850s onwards and allowed for the first photograph albums as distinct from scrapbooks. In societies where giving cards to acquaintances and business associates was common the addition of a photograph was a visual reminder that encouraged reciprocity. Disdéri> himself took numerous self-portraits that he used to promote his own business.  
  
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Photographers making carte de visites appreciated they could also take advantage of the opportunities for a visual business cards. The cards photographers created were basically of two types the cards showing the range of equipment the photographer had available for use or sale, as the cases of Richard Walzl (Baltimore) and Carlier, and the other was using a collage of photographs showing images for sale. 
  
295.06   Advertising >  Carte de visites: Advertising 
  
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295.07   Advertising >  Ranger & Austen: Clairvoyant Medical Examinations - Buffum & Cleveland 
  
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Send lock of hair and $1.00, with name, age and residence, plainly written, and receive by mail complete diagnosis of disease and advice concerning treatment.
 
Address
Buffum & Cleveland,
Syracuse, N.Y.
 
N.B. - The Photograph on the reverse is of Dr. C.T. Buffum, taken while entranced, and showing the controlling power, RED JACKET. 
  
295.08   Advertising >  Contemporary uses of carte de visites for employment 
  
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The popularity and declining costs of carte de visite[7] brought them within reach of the lower classes in a way that no other photographic type had really done up to that point. There are many photographers who took portraits or studies of the working class but it was the photographer who controlled what was taken, how posed, and where it would be shown or marketed. The subject rarely had a say it it. With the carte de visite it was the sitter who commissioned the portrait, could possibly have a say in the pose, took away the finished photograph and distributed them as required. This meant that for the first time it became possible for an employer to ask for a photograph to accompany a job application and we can find examples of this including:
 
Temperance agent (1870):
TEMPERANCE AGENT WANTED. - The Dumfriesshire and Kirkcudbrightshire Abstainers' Union wish to engage an Agent, qualified to advocate Abstinence principles, in their varied aspects and applications, by means of Lectures, Sermons, Visiting, &c. Salary, £130 sterling per annum. - Application, with testimonials and carte de visite, must be lodged, on or before, 16th February, 1870, with James Rodgers, Hon. Sec., 127, High-street, Dumfries.[8] 
  
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Medical Officer (1886):
Wanted, Medical Officer for the Hartlepools Friendly Societies Medical Association; must be fully qualified. - Apply, giving age and references, and enclosing carte-de-visite and testimonials, to T. Tweddell, Reed-street, West Hartlepool.[9]  
  
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Tuner and canvasser (1889):
TUNER and CANVASSER. Gentlemanly young man, with experience, WANTED, for the Country. Enclose carte-de-visite. State wages and references. H. Jackson, Messrs. Novello, Ewer and Co., 1, Berners Street, W.[10]  
  
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295.09   Advertising >  Cabinet cards: Advertising 
  
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295.10   Advertising >  Robinson & Roi: The Famous Glass Dress - Royal Robe of Princess Eulalia 
  
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In this cabinet card shows a mannequin wearing the glass dress that was ordered by the Spanish Princess Eulalia at the 1893 World's Fair. The back of the card provides the context and serves as a promotion for The Libbey Glass Company
  
295.11   Advertising >  Sutherland sisters 
  
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The Sutherland Sisters were a group of seven sisters who were famous for their extremely long hair which reportedly had a combined length of 37 feet. Whilst they were musically talented it was appreciated early on in their stage careers that the audience came to see their hair. Seeing a business opportunity their father came up with "“The Seven Sutherland Sisters Hair Grower” and later the "Scalp Cleaner" which were commercially very successful.[11]
 
Their publicity carried the following testimonial:
"Cincinnati, Ohio, March, 1884: - Having made a Chemical Analysis of the Hair Grower prepared by the Seven Long Haired Sisters, I hereby certify that I found it free from all injurious substances. It is beyond question the best preparation for the hair ever made and I cheerfully endorse it. -- J.R. Duff, M.D., Chemist."[12]
The length of their hair varied between three and seven feet and so to get around this difference in group photographs they were posed so the hair of each of them was touching the ground. 
  
295.12   Advertising >  McDonald: Advertising cabinet cards for the Storm Sign Co., South Bend, Ind. 
  
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295.13   Advertising >  I.W. Taber: The Taber photographic album of principal business houses, residences and persons (1880) 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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Trade directories listing the principal manufacturers, suppliers, and shops of a city or region were an essential part of any expanding town. They were the "Yellow Pages" of their day and preserved as essential research tools by local studies libraries. Some trade directories had tipped-in photographs[13] that were commissioned to illustrate the premises or goods of a vendor. Isiah West Taber took photographs of businesses in San Francisco for his directory The Taber photographic album of principal business houses, residences & persons (1880).[14] William James Topley produced a similar volume The Ottawa album, containing photographs and advertisements of the principal business houses, hotels and steamboats and local views (1875)[15] Pages from an advertising album of Philadelphia taken by S[amuel] McMullin also survive.[16] 
  
295.14   Advertising >  Banner ladies 
  
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In nineteenth century America banner ladies displayed the goods of a particular store or business on their clothing and participated in local parades and events to encourage trade. They frequently carried banners with the name of the business hence the name.[17] As the portraits of banner ladies were normally taken in studios presumably the cabinet cards were distributed as promotional items.
 
Early accounts of banner ladies and their function are rare with an all too brief mention referring to the 4th July 1845 celebrations in Lapeer Country, Michigan:
The grandeur of the marshals with their cocked hats, cockades and glittering swords, as they galloped about in all the "pomp and circumstance of glorious war," the roar of the artillery, the brilliant array of banner ladies, were well calculated to impress the imagination and memory of the average backwoods boy.[18]
 
  
   Advertising Banner Ladies 
View exhibition 
Title | Lightbox | Checklist
 
  
295.15   Advertising >  Seeking a wife (1881) 
  
By 1881 photography was so ubiquitous that it was used for finding companions in public.
A novel way of advertising for a wife has been adopted by an inhabitant of a provincial town. A photograph of the gentleman is placed in the window of a shopkeeper, and underneath is the following notice: "Wanted, a female companion to the above. Apply at the offlce."[19]
 
  
295.16   Advertising >  New York facades shown in cabinet cards 
  
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New York’s prominent display of industry and socio-economic development was pertinent early in the nation’s history, but it was not until the developmental construction of the city boroughs in the mid-nineteenth century that the city was transformed by spiralling metropolitan growth. Marshes were drained, farming land built over and lower class ramshackle developments were torn apart enabling the city to evolve into a new and upwardly mobile marketplace.
 
Urban dwelling in mid-nineteenth century New York brought with it all the problems of a city undergoing unbridled growth. Soon, during the "Gilded Age" of American entrepreneurial efforts spearheaded by families like the Vanderbilts – Gotham, as it would later be called, was prosperous and changing so fast that it is a wonder that commerce could exist in the forms shown in these photographs. New York as we know it today bears little resemblance to the gainful opportunities that it held for immigrants looking to make their way in New World.
 
These cabinet cards document New York’s internal struggles to build capital and wealth through every strata of its economic fibre – they are testimonies to fixed social standing amidst rapid economic change.
 
Proud shopkeepers and small factory workers stand in front of their workplaces as if to testify to their contribution to the growth of their places of employment, but more generally to New York City as a whole. Inn keepers, grocers, iron workers, and marketplace owners all make up the rich tapestry of life that permutated in the works of topographic firms such as Marksville, Wolff, The Manhattan Photo View Co, N.Y Phot Co., and the Metropolitan View Company among others. These firms recorded New York’s development in the age of collodion.
 
The subjects range from chicken pluckers to children on the tenement steps. It is indeed a record of amazing elasticity, confined by the edges of the photograph mount rather than one’s imagination. Though the photographers were not the first or the last to discover the importance of their topography, they did so with a sensitive eye that is rare in the stereoviews of the better known firms such as Anthony or Stacy. These firms ignored the people of New York to concentrate on the architectural grandeur. Perhaps, there was just no room for the individual in a city swallowing it’s own amidst canyons of offices and tenements.
 
There is another subtle quality about these images that predates the work of Eugčne Atget in Paris. The surreal and wonderful items found in storefront windows - an optician’s glaring sign, a mannequin hanging from a sign, or a delicious corset factory gave American cities a whisper of unguided, but lofty exuberance. These are memories from a time and a place that resonates with change - indeed some of these images hint at the cusp of modernity.[20][21] 
  
   Documentary NY Storefronts 
View exhibition 
Title | Lightbox | Checklist
 
  
295.17   Advertising >  Sports cards and cigarette cards 
  
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295.18   Advertising >  Advertising calenders 
  
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295.19   Advertising >  Gelatin silver prints: Advertising 
  
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Documentation of advertising and marketing initiatives 
  
295.20   Advertising >  Documenting window and shop displays 
  
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Photography has played a key part of the documentation of advertising programs of shops showing how storefront windows are dressed and how goods are displayed within. 
  
Photographers 
  
295.21   Advertising >  Margaret Watkins: Advertising 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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Margaret Watkins[22] (1884-1969) was a Canadian photographer who began studying at the Clarence White School of Photography[23] in Maine in 1914. Her skill was appreciated and she taught at the school between 1916 and 1928 with her students including Margaret Bourke-White, Laura Gilpin, Paul Outerbridge, Ralph Steiner and Doris Ulmann. This period was one of fluxing trends in photography as Pictorialism and Modernism intertwined and her work reflects this. [24] Margaret Watkins was one of the first women photographers to be accepted within the male-dominated world of advertising in the 1920s and she worked for the Fairfax advertising agency, J. Walter Thompson and Macy’s Department Store.[25] 
  
295.22   Advertising >  J. Pécsi: Photo und Publizität - Photo and Advertising (1930) 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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Jozsef Pécsi in his book Photo und Publizität - Photo and Advertising[26] included remarkably bold advertising photomontages, and one of the first books on the subject of photography in advertising. Both the leading prize in commercial photography in Hungary and the library at the House of Hungarian photography are named after this key figure of the New Objectivity and European avant-garde
  
295.23   Advertising >  Victor Keppler: Advertising 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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Victor Keppler was a notable advertising and commercial photographer particularly in the 1930s-1950s doing campaigns for U.S. Steel, General Electric, Nescafe, Lever Brothers and many others. 
  
295.24   Advertising >  Lejaren ŕ Hiller: Surgery through the Ages 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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Lejaren ŕ Hiller used sets and costumes to reconstruct tableaux vivants of surgical procedures and produced one a year between 1927 and the 1950s as advertising for the American medical suture company Davis & Geck. Some of these were published in 1944 in the book Surgery Through the Ages: A Pictorial Chronicle.[27] 
  
295.25   Advertising >  Nickolas Muray: Advertising 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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Nickolas Muray was an outstanding proponent of the use of colour photography for commercial and advertising work.[28] He was also a talented fencer and participated for the US in the 1928 and 1932 Olympics - and a lover of Frida Kahlo
  

Footnotes 
  
  1. Λ For a history of advertising photography - Robert A. Sobieszek, 1988, The Art of Persuasion: A History of Advertising Photography, (New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc.)
     
    There are also regional histories - Amélie Gastaut et al., 2006, La photographie publicitaire en France: De Man Ray ŕ Jean-Paul Goude, (Editions Les Arts décoratifs); Elspeth H. Brown, 2005, The Corporate Eye: Photography and the Rationalization of American Commercial Culture 1884–1929, (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press)
     
    Online there are examples of related exhibitions - "The High Art of Photographic Advertising - The 1934 National Alliance of Art and Industry Exhibition" (The prints are now at the Harvard Business School and the details on the exhibition are worthy of examination.)
    (Accessed: 6 Agust 2013)
    www.library.hbs.edu/hc/naai/ 
      
  2. Λ A large proportion of the archive of Nickolas Muray is in the collection of George Eastman House, Rochester, NY. 
      
  3. Λ Marianne Fulton et al., 1996, Pictorialism into Modernism: The Clarence H. White School of Photography, (New York: Rizzoli, in association with George Eastman House and the Detroit Institute of Arts) 
      
  4. Λ March 14, 1859, "Photography as an Advertising Medium", The Photographic News for Amateur Photographers, vol. 2, no. 28, p. 22 
      
  5. Λ Elizabeth Anne McCauley, 1985, A. A. E. Disderi and the Carte de Visite Portrait, (New Haven: Yale) 
      
  6. Λ William Culp Darrah, 1981, Cartes De Visite In Nineteenth Century Photography, (Gettysburg, Pa.: William C. Darrah); Thomas Harris, 2013, ‘The Mighty, Yet Diminutive, Carte de Visite‘, in Bryan & Page Ginns, 2013, Antique Photographica: The Collector's Vision (Schiffer), pp. 100-120; Elizabeth Anne McCauley, 1985, A. A. E. Disderi and the Carte de Visite Portrait, (New Haven: Yale) 
      
  7. Λ William Culp Darrah, 1981, Cartes De Visite In Nineteenth Century Photography, (Gettysburg, Pa.: William C. Darrah); Thomas Harris, 2013, ‘The Mighty, Yet Diminutive, Carte de Visite‘, in Bryan & Page Ginns, 2013, Antique Photographica: The Collector's Vision (Schiffer), pp. 100-120; Elizabeth Anne McCauley, 1985, A. A. E. Disderi and the Carte de Visite Portrait, (New Haven: Yale) 
      
  8. Λ The Temperance Record: The Organ of the National Temperance League, no. 723, February 5, 1870, p. 71. 
      
  9. Λ The Lancet, The Lancet General Advertiser, August 28, 1886, p. 42. 
      
  10. Λ The Musical Times, October 1, 1889, p. 581. 
      
  11. Λ The Sutherland Sisters (Accessed: 23 July 2013)
    www.niagara2008.com/history22.html 
      
  12. Λ The seven Sutherand sisters were: Sarah (3 ft), Victoria (7 ft), Isabella / Isabel (6 ft), Grace (5 ft), Naomi (5 1/2 ft), Dora (4 1/2 ft) and Mary (6 ft) and the lengths of their hair are given. This is from an example of their publicity materials.
    pinterest.com/pin/198510296046026991/ 
      
  13. Λ Tipped-in - ILAB: International League of Antiquarian Booksellers
    (Accessed: 7 November 2013)
    www.ilab.org/eng/glossary/557-tipped-in.html
    Attached to, but not integral to the binding of the book. We usually use this term to indicate something that has been added: a letter from the author, a newspaper or magazine review or obituary, etc. The nature of what is tipped-in will determine whether this addition will enhance or devalue the book.
     
      
  14. Λ I. West Taber, 1880, The Taber photographic album of principal business houses, residences & persons (San Francisco: I. W. Taber) 
      
  15. Λ 1875, The Ottawa album, containing photographs and advertisements of the principal business houses, hotels and steamboats and local views (Ottawa), includes 61 tipped-in prints.
     
    William James Topley - Dictionary of Canadian Biography
    (Accessed: 28 November 2013)
    www.biographi.ca/en/bio/topley_william_james_15E.html 
      
  16. Λ Thanks to Dan Weinstock for providing examples from the S[amuel] McMullin (Philadelphia) advertising album. 
      
  17. Λ I have come across no original accounts of banner ladies in literature or diaries of the period and would welcome further information - alan@luminous-lint.com 
      
  18. Λ 1888, History of Lapeer County Michigan, (Chicago, H.R. Page & Co.), p. 38 
      
  19. Λ August 1881, Gleason's Monthly Companion, vol. X, no. 8, p. 380 
      
  20. Λ We would like to hear from people who have information on the following New York photographic companies:
     
    Corliss & Bancroft, Photographers, 260 West 27th Street
     
    Gardner & Corliss, Out Door Photographers. Office 249 W. 27th Street, Room 13.
    It also lists W.O. Long Fine Portraits on 395 and 687 Eighth Avenue.
     
    W.E. Garrison Photographer. 209 E. 47th Street
     
    S. Marksville. 343 East 34th Street
     
    Mercantile View Company, 381 Canal Street, New York
     
    Metropolitan View Co., No 237 East 44th Street
    This firm was a partnership of the better known firms of L. Wolff & S. Marksville.
     
    National Photographic View Co. (G.W. Heppner) no. 339 East 34th St.
    The National Photographic View Co., 235 East 34th Street
    The National Photographic View Co., W.O. Long and G.W. Heppner, 235 East 34th Street, New York
     
    N.Y. Photograph Co., G.W. Bancroft, Landscape Photographer, no. 337 East 34th Street, New York
     
    New York Photographing Co. (Corliss & Bancroft), 260 West 27th Street.
     
    Photo View, 757 3rd Ave.
     
    D.C. Redington, Photographer, N.W. corner 34th St. & Broadway, New York
     
    L. Wolff, Landscape Photographer, 23 Chauncey Street
     
    Please send any information to alan@luminous-lint.com and I‘ll forward it on to Brad Feuerhelm. 
      
  21. Λ Text courtesy by Brad Feuerhelm (August 2006) 
      
  22. Λ Mary O'Connor & Katherine Tweedie, 2007, Seduced by Modernity: The Photography of Margaret Watkins, (Montreal: McGill-Queen's University Press) 
      
  23. Λ Barbara L. Michaels, 1996, Nov-Dec, ‘Pattern vs. Passion: The legacy of the Clarence H. White School of Photography‘, Afterimage, vol. 24, pp. 7-11 
      
  24. Λ Marianne Fulton et al., 1996, Pictorialism into Modernism: The Clarence H. White School of Photography, (New York: Rizzoli, in association with George Eastman House and the Detroit Institute of Arts) 
      
  25. Λ Margaret Watkins, 1926, ‘Advertising and Photography.‘, Pictorial Photography in America, vol. 4 
      
  26. Λ J. Pécsi, 1930, Photo und Publizität - Photo and Advertising (Berlin: Josef Singer A.-G.), [Text is in German and English.] 
      
  27. Λ Paul Benton and John H. Hewlett, 1944, Surgery Through the Ages: A Pictorial Chronicle, (New York: Hasting House) [photographs by Lejaren ŕ Hiller.] 
      
  28. Λ A large collection of the work of Nickolas Muray is held at George Eastman House. There is a website run by his descendents - nickolasmuray.com
      

alan@luminous-lint.com

 
  

HomeContents > Further research

 
  
Thumbnail Thumbnail Thumbnail Thumbnail Thumbnail Thumbnail Thumbnail  
  
General reading 
  
Brown, Elspeth H., 2005, The Corporate Eye: Photography and the Rationalization of American Commercial Culture 1884–1929, (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press) [Δ
  
Fulton, Marianne et al., 1996, Pictorialism into Modernism: The Clarence H. White School of Photography, (New York: Rizzoli, in association with George Eastman House and the Detroit Institute of Arts) [Δ
  
Gastaut, Amélie (ed.) et al., 2006, La photographie publicitaire en France: De Man Ray ŕ Jean-Paul Goude, (Editions Les Arts décoratifs) isbn-10: 2901422888 isbn-13: 978-2901422884 [Δ
  
Jacob, John, 2012, Kodak Girl, (Steidl) isbn-10: 3869303247 isbn-13: 978-3869303246 [Δ
  
Nassar, Issam; Almarcegui, Patricia & Worswick, Clark, 2010, Gardens of Sand: Commercial Photography in the Middle East 1859-1905, (Turner Ediciones) isbn-10: 8475068987 isbn-13: 978-8475068985 [Δ
  
Sobieszek, Robert A., 1988, The Art of Persuasion: A History of Advertising Photography, (New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc.) [Δ
  
Stein, Sally Ann, 1991, The Rhetoric of the Colorful and the Colorless: American Photography and Material Culture Between the Wars, (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan) [Δ
  
Strand, Paul, 1930, 19 Feb, ‘Steichen and Commercial Art‘, The New Republic, vol. 61, no. 794, p. 21 [Δ
  
Travis, David & Siegel, Elizabeth (eds.), 2002, Taken by Design: Photographs from the Institute of Design, 1937–1971, (Chicago: The Art Institute of Chicago, in association with The University of Chicago Press) [Δ
  
Wicks, Sidney F., 1934, 11 May, ‘Photography in Modern Advertising and Commerce‘, The British Journal of Photography, vol. 81, no. 3862 [Δ
  
 
  
Readings on, or by, individual photographers 
  
Ralph Bartholomew 
  
Bartholomew Jr., Ralph, 1998, Retail Fictions : The Commercial Photography of Ralph Bartholomew Jr., (Los Angeles County Museum of Art) [Δ
  
Lejaren ŕ Hiller 
  
Brown, E. H., 2000, December, ‘Rationalizing consumption: Lejaren ŕ Hiller and the origins of American advertising photography, 1913–1924‘, Enterprise & Society, vol. 1, p. 715–738 [Δ
  
Hiller, Lejaren ŕ; Banov, Leon & Benton, Paul, 1944, Surgery through the Ages: A pictorial chronicle, (New York: Hastings House) [Δ
  
József Pécsi 
  
Pécsi, J., 1930, Photo und Publizität - Photo and Advertising, (Berlin: Josef Singer A.-G,) [Δ
  
Edward Steichen 
  
Johnston, Patricia, 1997, Real Fantasies: Edward Steichen’s Advertising Photography, (Berkeley: University of California Press) [Δ
  
Josef Sudek 
  
Sudek, Josef, 2009, Josef Sudek: The Advertising Photographs, (Torst) isbn-13: 978-8072153428 [Δ
  
Margaret Watkins 
  
Pauli, Lori, 2012, Margaret Watkins: Domestic Symphonies, (National Gallery of Canada) isbn-10: 0888849036 isbn-13: 978-0888849038 [Introduction by Joseph Mulholland] [Δ
  
Watkins, Margaret, 1926, ‘Advertising and Photography‘, Pictorial Photography in America, vol. 4 [Δ
  
 
  
If you feel this list is missing a significant book or article please let me know - Alan - alan@luminous-lint.com 
  

HomeContentsPhotographers > Photographers worth investigating

 
Ansel Adams  (1902-1984) • Richard Avedon  (1923-2004) • Sid Avery • Ralph Bartholomew  (1907-1985) • Herbert Bayer  (1900-1985) • Margaret Bourke-White  (1904-1971) • Anton Bruehl  (1900-1982) • Marie Cosindas  (1925-) • Gordon Coster  (1906-1988) • Brian Duffy  (1933-2010) • Hans Finsler  (1891-1972) • Ruzzie Green  (1892-1956) • Lejaren ŕ Hiller  (1880-1969) • Lewis W. Hine  (1874-1940) • Hiro  (1930-) • Lotte Jacobi  (1896-1990) • Alfred Cheney Johnston  (1885-1971) • Barbara Kasten  (1936-) • Victor Keppler  (1904-1987) • Gustav Klutsis  (1895-1944) • François Kollar  (1904-1979) • Annie Leibovitz  (1949-) • Jay Maisel  (1931-) • Robert Mapplethorpe  (1946-1989) • Herbert Matter  (1907-1984) • Eric Meola  (1946-) • Duane Michals  (1932-) • László Moholy-Nagy  (check) • Sarah Moon  (check) • Nickolas Muray  (1892-1965) • Paul Outerbridge  (1896-1958) • Irving Penn  (1917-2009) • William M. Rittase  (1894-1968) • Jaroslav Rössler  (1902-1990) • August Sander  (1876-1964) • Xanti Schawinsky  (1904-1979) • Victor Skrebneski  (1929-) • Ema Spencer  (1857-1941) • Anton Stankowski  (1906-1998) • Edward Steichen  (1879-1973) • Bert Stern  (1929-2013) • Grete Stern  (1904-1999) • Maurice Tabard  (1897-1984) • Deborah Turbeville  (1937-2013) • Pete Turner  (1934-) • Margaret Watkins  (1884-1969) • Henry Wolf • Piet Zwart  (check)
HomeThemes > Advertising 
 
A wider gazeA closer lookRelated topics 
  
Advertising in newspapers 
Advertising in publications 
Commercial still lifes 
Commercial 
Ephemera 
Non-canonical photography 
 
  

HomeContentsOnline exhibitions > Advertising

Please submit suggestions for Online Exhibitions that will enhance this theme.
Alan - alan@luminous-lint.com

 
  
ThumbnailAdvertising and Commercial Photography: An Introduction 
Title | Lightbox | Checklist
Released (February 5, 2012) If you have examples of "advertising albums" or 19th century trade catalogues with tipped-in illustrations I'd be most interested in learning about them as I'm interested in doing online exhibitions. Thanks.
ThumbnailBanner girls and banner ladies 
Title | Lightbox | Checklist
Released (May 27, 2012)
ThumbnailNew York facades shown in cabinet cards 
Title | Lightbox | Checklist
Released (August 16, 2006)
  
 
  

HomeVisual indexes > Advertising

Please submit suggestions for Visual Indexes to enhance this theme.
Alan - alan@luminous-lint.com

 
  
   Photographer 
  
ThumbnailDexheimer's Studio: Banner girl 
ThumbnailGermaine Krull: Le Confort au Palais et dans les Appartements (1931) 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailHans Finsler: Commerical and advertising 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailHorst: Round the Clock 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailI.W. Taber: The Taber photographic album of principal business houses, residences & persons 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailJ. Pécsi: Photo und Publizität - Photo and Advertising (1930) 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailLejaren ŕ Hiller: Surgery through the Ages 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailMcDonald: Advertising cabinet cards for the Storm Sign Co., South Bend, Ind. 
ThumbnailNickolas Muray: Advertising 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailOliver Sarony: Advertising Carte de Visite 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailR. Goebel: Photographie-Gallerie 
ThumbnailRanger & Austen: Clairvoyant Medical Examinations - Buffum & Cleveland 
ThumbnailRobinson & Roi: The Famous Glass Dress - Royal Robe of Princess Eulalia 
ThumbnailS. McMullin: Advertising album 
ThumbnailVictor Keppler: Advertising 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailWilly Kessels: Advertising 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
 
  
   Connections 
  
ThumbnailPierre Jahan - Guy Bourdin 
 
 
  
   Occupationals 
  
ThumbnailBanner girls and ladies 
 
 
  
   Themes 
  
ThumbnailAdvertising and Commercial 
ThumbnailAdvertising and Commercial: Advertising albums 
ThumbnailBenetton advertising campaigns 
ThumbnailParts of the Columbus Watch 
ThumbnailScientific: Medical: Disabilities: Disability and advertising 
ThumbnailThe Tremont Watch Company 
 
  
   Techniques 
  
ThumbnailAlbumen prints: Advertising 
ThumbnailCabinet cards: Themes: Advertising 
ThumbnailCarte de visites: Themes: Advertising 
ThumbnailGelatin silver prints: Advertising 
ThumbnailMagic lanterns: Themes: Advertising 
ThumbnailTintypes: Advertising 
 
  
   Private collections 
  
ThumbnailCollection Laddy Kite: Banner girls and banner ladies 
 
 
  
   Still thinking about these... 
  
ThumbnailBanner lady for Shaving Mug Decorator - Painter Sam Jones 
ThumbnailPromotional carte de visite for Howard, Goodrich and Pierce, Clothing, Furnishings, Ladies and Gents Boots, Shoes, Party and Wedding Outfitters 
ThumbnailSport cards and cigarette cards 
ThumbnailWindow dressing Kleinhans Co. (Buffalo, NY) 
ThumbnailTrott & Co. (Boston, publisher): John C. Thomas, Dealer in Hats, Caps, Furs, and Gentlemen's Furnishing Goods 
 
 
  
Refreshed: 06 September 2014, 06:00
 
  
 
  
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