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HomeContentsThemes > Tableau vivant

Contents

Introduction
213.01   An introduction to tableaux vivants
213.02   Mimicing art within Pictorialism
213.03   Mrs Severn: Tableaux vivants (1854)
213.04   Charles Dickens and tableau vivant
Narratives
213.05   Using photographs to illustrate narratives: Arthurian
Photographers
213.06   Henry Peach Robinson: Little Red Riding Hood
213.07   Lejaren ŕ Hiller: Surgery through the Ages
213.08   Josef Jindrich Šechtl and Ignác Šechtl: Living statues
This theme includes example sections and will be revised and added to as we proceed. Suggestions for additions, improvements and the correction of factual errors are always appreciated. 
  
Status: Collect > Document > Analyse > Improve
 
  
Introduction 
  
213.01   Art >  An introduction to tableaux vivants 
  
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Slideshow (Be patient as this has 19 slides to load.) 
  
A tableau vivant is a scene played by one or more actors who remain silent and motionless.
 
When Charles Dickens toured America he was entertained at grand balls which consisted of a combination of dances and tableau vivant. Dickens would have watched or participated in a dance and then presumably behind a curtain a suitably attired group armed with appropriate props would take their positions in a well-known scene from "Oliver Twist" or "Nicholas Nickleby" the curtains would be drawn back to reveal them to the audience with appropriate acclamation.[1] Tableau vivant have declined in popularity along with costume parties, mime and dressing up although the tradition continues with dressed up characters in tourist centers.
 
Within the artistic milieu of England in the pre-First World War years arts and science were entwined. The culturally well connected families knew each other inter-married, visited each other, dressed up and played. The complex relationships between painting and photography have been well explored in numerous books, artists used photography (e.g. Degas[2], Alfons Mucha[3], Thomas Eakins[4], Frank Brangwyn and David Wilkie Wynfield[5][6]), photographers mimicked painting styles (e.g. Julia Margaret Cameron[7], William Lake Price[8] and Henry Peach Robinson[9]), in studios models posed either clad or nude and were often seen by the respectable parts of society as close to prostitutes. There were diverse motivations for tableau vivant and a simplistic, and very preliminary, typology is in the table below.
 
A preliminary typology of Tableau vivant
Dressing in costume Marcus Sparling: Zouave 2nd Division, Portrait of Roger Fenton (1855)  
  
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David Wilkie Wynfield: Artists from the Royal Academy dressed in Venetian Renaissance clothing  
  
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Folktales Henry Peach Robinson: Little Red Riding Hood (1858)  
  
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Lewis Carroll: St. George and the Dragon (1875)  
  
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Characters from popular literature William Lake Price: Robinson Crusoe (ca. 1857)  
  
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William Lake Price: Don Quixote in his Study (1855)  
  
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Julia Margaret Cameron's illustrations for Tennyson's Idylls of the King and other poems
Set pieces portraying King Arthur, Lancelot, Merlin, Vivien and other characters.  
  
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Historical events James Elliott: Crowning of Henry the Seventh on Bosworth Field  
  
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Ludwig Angerer: Marie Antoinette in Prison (1860s)  
  
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Lejaren ŕ Hiller: Surgery through the Ages  
  
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Recreations or pastiches of famous paintings Walter Barnes: The Apotheosis of Degas [Apothéose de Degas] which is a parody of the painting Apotheosis of Homer by Ingres (1827)  
  
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Use as models for other artworks Achille Bonnuit photographed orientalist tableau whilst working at the Porcelain Factory at Sčvres (1860s)  
  
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Religious Gabriel Harrison: The Infant Saviour Bearing the Cross [The Cost of Democracy] (ca. 1850)  
  
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Fred Holland Day: [Crucifixion frontal, with Mary, Mary Magdalene, Joseph and St. John(?)] (1898)
 
 
  
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Julia Margaret Cameron: La Madonna Esaltata; Fervent in prayer (1865)  
  
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Moral depictions Oscar Gustave Rejlander: Homeless (ca. 1860)  
  
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Social statements Hippolyte Bayard: Self-portrait as a drowned man (1840)  
  
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As further examples arrive I'll abandon or refine parts of the structure. 
  
213.02   Art >  Mimicing art within Pictorialism 
  
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Slideshow 
  
In the rise of pictoralism certain technical processes, particularly bromoil, gum bichromate and pigment prints, allowed photographers to create single images that could be manipulated in the darkroom to appear similar to painting brush strokes. This became a global movement as international exhibitions and publications meant that their work was seen by travelers and their themes, techniques and visual styles adopted.
 
Some photographers including Guido Rey and Richard Polak used sets, props and costumes to create photographs that mimicked the styles of old master paintings.  
  
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Johannes Vermeer (Dutch Master, 1632-1675) 
  
  • Guido Rey (1861-1935) Italian pictorialist from Turin who, like Richard Polak, created living tableau in the style of the Dutch painters Vermeer and Pieter de Hooch.[10] In 1902 his work was included in the Esposizione Internazionale di Arte Decorativa e Moderna di Torino and later it was published outside of Italy in prestigious magazines including Studio and Camera Work[11] (vol. 24, October 1908).  
      
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    Guido Rey 
      
  • Richard Polak (1870-1956) was a Dutch pictoralist who recreated sets similar to those of the great Dutch oil painting masters (Vermeer and Steen) and then photographed actors in them. He published them in a portfolio Photographs from Life in Old Dutch Costume[12].  
      
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    Richard Polak 
      
  • Count Aleksander von Tyszkiewicz was an aristocrat painter who recreated scenes reminiscent of the period of Napoleon Bonaparte.[13]  
      
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    Count Aleksander von Tyszkiewicz 
      
This tradition is continued by Australian photographer Bill Gekas who photographs his daughter in recreated tableaus of the Old Masters similar to those of Vermeer and Rembrandt
  
213.03   Art >  Mrs Severn: Tableaux vivants (1854) 
  
In an American Book, The Lady Companion; or, Sketches of Life, Manners, and Morals, at the Present Day (1854), Tableau vivant are explained:
Perhaps there is no intellectual amusement in fashionable life the nature of which is so little understood as the Tableau Vivant; it being generally considered as only a vehicle for display, whereas its real purpose is to arrange scientifically a combination of natural objects, so as to make a good picture, according to the rules of art.
 
A tableau vivant is literally what its name imports— a living picture composed of living persons; and, when skilfully arranged and seen at a proper distance, it produces all the effect of a real picture. It is said, that the first living picture was contrived by a profligate young German nobleman, who having, during the absence of his father, sold one of the celebrated pictures belonging to the old castle, which was an heir-loom, to conceal the deficiency, placed some of his companions behind the frame, so as to imitate the missing picture, and to deceive his father, who passed through the room without being conscious of his loss.
 
A tableau vivant may be formed in two ways; it may consist of a group of persons, who take some wellknown subject in history or fiction to illustrate, and who form a group to tell the story according to their own taste; or, it may be a copy, as exact as circum stances will permit, of some celebrated picture. The first plan, it may be easily imagined, is very rarely effective; since, as we find that even the best masters are often months, or even years, before they can arrange a group satisfactorily on canvas, it is not probable that persons who are not artists should succeed in making good impromptu pictures. Indeed, it has been observed, that artists themselves, when they have to arrange a tableau vivant, always prefer copying a picture to composing one.
 
Copying a real picture, by placing living persons in the positions of the figures indicated in the picture, appears, at first sight, an easy task enough; and the effect ought to be easily attained, as there can be no bad drawing, and no confused light and shade, to destroy the effect of the grouping. There are, however, many difficulties to conquer, which it requires some knowledge of art to be aware of. Painting being on a flat surface, every means are taken to give roundness and relief to the figures, which qualities of course are found naturally in a tableau vivant. In a picture, the light is made effective by a dark shadow placed near it; diminished lights or demi-tints are introduced to prevent the principal light appearing a spot; and these are linked together by artful shades, which show the outline in some places, and hide it in others. The colours must also be carefully arranged, so as to blend or harmonize with each other. A want of attention to these minute points will be sufficient to destroy the effect of the finest picture, even to those who are so unacquainted with art as to be incapable of explaining why they are dissatisfied, except by an involuntary liking or disliking of what they see.
 
The best place for putting up a tableau vivant is in a doorway, with an equal space on each side; or, at least, some space on both sides is necessary; and if there is a room or a passage between the door selected for the picture and the room the company is to see it from, so much the better, as there should be a distance of at least four yards between the first row of the spectators and the picture. It must be remembered that, while the tableau is being shown, nearly all the lights must be put out in the room where the company is assembled; and, perhaps, only one single candle, properly placed, in the intervening space between the company and the tableau, must be left slightly to illuminate the frame. In the above-mentioned doorway a frame, somewhat smaller than the original picture, must be suspended, three, four, or even five feet from the floor, as may suit the height of the door; or, if the door is not very high, the frame may be put one or two feet behind to gain space; but care must be taken to fill up the opening that would, in that case, show between the doorway and the frame; also a piece of dark cloth ought to be put from the bottom of the frame to the ground, to give the appearance of the picture hanging on the wall. The most important thing is, that chairs or tables ought to be placed behind the frame, so that the persons who are to represent the tableau may sit or stand as nearly in the position, with regard to the frame, as the figures appear to do in the real picture they are trying to imitate, and at about two feet from the frame, so that the light which is attached to the back of the frame may fall properly on the figures. In order to accomplish this, great study and contrivance are required, so that the shades may fall in precisely the same places as in the original picture; and sometimes the light is put on one side, sometimes on the other, and often on the top; and sometimes shades of tin or paper are put between the lights and the tableau, to assist in throwing a shadow over any particular part. The background is one of the most important parts, and should be made to resemble that of the picture as nearly as possible; if it is dark, coarse cloth absorbs the light best; but whether it is to be black, blue, or brown, must depend on the tint in the picture; should the background be a light one, coloured calico, turned on the wrong side, is generally used. If trees or flowers form the background, of course real branches or plants must be introduced to imitate those in the picture. Even rocks have been imitated; and spun glass has often successfully represented water. A thin black gauze, black muslin, or tarlatan veil should be fastened to the top of the frame, on the outside of it, through which the tableau is to be seen.
 
Care ought to be taken to conceal the peculiarities of the different materials used in the draperies, and it is even sometimes necessary to cover the stuffs used for the purpose with a gauze of a different colour, so as to imitate the broken and transparent colours found in most good pictures. This, carefully attended to, will give a quietness and simplicity to the whole, which will greatly add to the illusion.[14]
 
  
213.04   Art >  Charles Dickens and tableau vivant 
  
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In a buiography of Charles Dickens it listed the order of events and
... we may state that for the " Dickens Ball," at New York, on February 14th, 1842, a committee of the citizens recommended, among many other suggestions of a similar character, the following:
 
ORDER OF DANCES AND TABLEAUX VIVANTS.
 
1. Grand March.
2. Tableau Vivant "A Sketch, by Boz."
3. Amilie Quadrille.
4. Tableau Vivant " The Seasons," a poem, with music.
5. Quadrille Waltz, selections.
6. Tableau Vivant The book of " Oliver Twist."
T. Quadrille March Norma.
8. Tableau Vivant "The Ivy Green."
9. Victoria Waltz.
10. Tableau Vivant " Little Nell."
11. Basket Quadrille.
12. Tableau Vivant The book of "Nicholas Nickleby." 13. March.
14. Tableau Vivant "A Sketch, by Boz."
15. Spanish Dance.
16. Tableau Vivant " The Pickwick Papers."
[15]
 
  
Narratives 
  
213.05   Art >  Using photographs to illustrate narratives: Arthurian 
  
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Slideshow 
  
Arthurian stories had been a part of English folklore and legend long before they were recorded in French romances and the compilations of Sir Thomas Malory in the fifteenth century. William Caxton published Le Morte d'Arthur in 1485 so these were a thread within the Victorian imagination as photography became popular. Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1809–1892) breathed fresh life into the tales with his cycle of twelve poems The Idylls of the King (1859-1885). Tennyson was a popular poet and was appointed Poet Laureate in 1850. The poetry of the age with the exploits and loves of Sir Lancelot, King Arthur, Queen Guinevere and the power of Merlin along with the original sources were Salon based genre-painting[16] and popular photography. Dressing up in costume for plays and tableau vivant was a feature of nineteenth century house parties and photographers such as Henry Peach Robinson[17] and Julia Margaret Cameron[18] took staged photographs that portrayed moments from the stories.
 
Julia Margaret Cameron, who was a friend of Tennyson,[19] took the photographs for an edition of Idylls of the King and Other Poems (1874-1875).[20] 
  
Photographers 
  
213.06   Art >  Henry Peach Robinson: Little Red Riding Hood 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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Slideshow 
  
Henry Peach Robinson prepared a series of four photographs in 1858 to illustrate the folktale of "Little Red Riding Hood".[21]
  1. Her Mother having only one day made some cakes, said to Little Red Riding Hood, "I hear your poor old Grandma has been ailing; so, prithee, go and see if she be any better, and take her these cakes and a pot of butter.''
     
  2. ''Who is there?' said the Wolf. 'It is me, your own little grandchild', the artless little girl replied, 'I have brought you some nice cakes and a little pot of butter.' The Wolf, softening his voice as much as he could, said 'Pull the bobbin, and the latch will go up.''
     
  3. Little Red Riding Hood then went and drew back the curtain, when she was much surprised to see how oddly her Grandmother looked in her nightclothes!
     
  4. Little Red Riding Hood hastened home to tell her mother all that had befallen her; nor did she forget that night to thank heaven fervently having delivered her from the jaws of the Wolf
     
The series was shown at the 1859 Photographic Society and could be purchased for 5 shillings.[22] 
  
213.07   Art >  Lejaren ŕ Hiller: Surgery through the Ages 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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Lejaren ŕ Hiller used sets and costumes to reconstruct tableaux vivants of surgical procedures and produced one a year between 1927 and the 1950s as advertising for the American medical suture company Davis & Geck. Some of these were published in 1944 in the book Surgery Through the Ages: A Pictorial Chronicle.[23] 
  
213.08   Art >  Josef Jindrich Šechtl and Ignác Šechtl: Living statues 
  
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Slideshow 
  
 
  
 
  

Footnotes 
  
  1. Λ John Camden Hotten, George Augustus Sala and Arthur Penrhyn Stanley Charles Dickens: The Story of his life (New York: Harper & Brothers, 1870), p. 42 
      
  2. Λ Malcolm Daniel, 1998, Edgar Degas: Photographer, (New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art) [With essays by Eugenia Parry & Theodore Reff] 
      
  3. Λ Graham Ovenden, 1974, Alphonse Mucha Photographs, (Academy Editions Ltd) 
      
  4. Λ Gordon Hendricks, 1972, The Photographs of Thomas Eakins, (New York: Grossman Publishers); David Sewell (ed.), 2001, Thomas Eakins, (Philadelphia: Philadelphia Museum of Art in association with Yale University Press) 
      
  5. Λ Juliet Hacking, 1995, ‘David Wilkie Wynfield: The Great Amateur‘, History of Photography, vol. 19, no. 4, pp. 322-327; Juliet Hacking, 2000, Princes of Victorian Bohemia, (Prestel) 
      
  6. Λ The National Portrait Gallery in London has a collection of portraits by David Wilkie Wynfield - www.npg.org.uk/collections/search/set/362 as does the Royal Academy of Arts (London) 
      
  7. Λ For a catalogue raisonné of the photographs of Julia Margaret Cameron - Julian Cox & Colin Ford, 2003, Julia Margaret Cameron: The Complete Photographs, (Los Angeles: Getty Publications)
     
    For the album Julia Margaret Cameron gave to her friend Sir John Herschel - Colin Ford, 1975, The Cameron Collection: An Album of Photographs by Julia Margaret Cameron Presented to Sir John Herschel, (Workingham, England: Van Nostrand Reinhold, in association with the National Portrait Gallery, London)
     
    Julia Margaret Cameron, 1874, Annals of My Glass House (Unfinished manuscript); Reprinted in full in - Violet Hamilton, 1996, Annals of my glass house: photographs by Julia Margaret Cameron, (Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery), p. 15; Also reprinted in - Beaumont Newhall, 1980, "Annals of my Glass House" IN, Photography: Essays and Images, (New York: Museum of Modern Art) 
      
  8. Λ William Lake Price, 1863, A Manual of Photographic Manipulation Treating of the Practice of the Art and its Various Applications to Nature, (London: John Churchill and Sons) [2nd edition] 
      
  9. Λ H.P. Robinson, 1869, Pictorial Effect in Photography: Being Hints on Composition and Chiaroscuro for Photographers. To which is added a chapter on Combination Printing, (London: Piper & Carter) [British editions: 1869, 1879, 1881, 1893.; American: 1881, 1892; French: 1885; German:1886. Reprinted with an introduction by Robert A. Sobieszek (Pawley: Helios, 1971) 
      
  10. Λ Sadakichi Hartmann, "Guido Rey: A Master of Detail Composition" IN Sadakichi Hartmann, 1978,The Valiant Knights of Daguerre: Selected Critical Essays on Photography and Profiles of Photographic Pioneers, (University of California Press) 
      
  11. Λ For Camera Work - Pam Roberts, 1997, Camera Work: The Complete Illustrations 1903–1917. Alfred Stieglitz, 291 Gallery and Camera Work, (Köln and New York: Taschen) 
      
  12. Λ Richard Polak, 1913-1915, Photographs from Life in Old Dutch Costume [Folio of sixty-five photogravures, variously sized to approx. 9 x 6˝ in., each with printed credit, process and title, mounted on thick card with Printed in Germany blindstamp, printed title page, introduction by F.J. Mortimer and plate list, 20 x 14˝ in.] 
      
  13. Λ See: Count Aleksander von Tyszkiewicz , "Scene d'intérieur Empire", [Photo-Club de Paris / 1897, Pl. XXXV], 1897 ; Count Aleksander von Tyszkiewicz, "Der Besuch", [Die Kunst in der Photographie (Art Folio #4)], 1898 
      
  14. Λ A Lady (edited by) The Lady Companion; or, Sketches of Life, Manners, and Morals, at the Present Day (Philadelphia: H.C. Peck & Theo. Bliss, 1854), pp. 91-94. 
      
  15. Λ John Camden Hotten, George Augustus Sala and Arthur Penrhyn Stanley Charles Dickens: The Story of his life (New York: Harper & Brothers, 1870), p. 42 
      
  16. Λ William Holman Hunt, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, John William Waterhouse, Frank Cadogan Cowper, John Collier, Edward Burne-Jones and other Pre-Raphaelite artists painting Arthurian themes. 
      
  17. Λ H.P. Robinson, 1869, Pictorial Effect in Photography: Being Hints on Composition and Chiaroscuro for Photographers. To which is added a chapter on Combination Printing, (London: Piper & Carter) [British editions: 1869, 1879, 1881, 1893.; American: 1881, 1892; French: 1885; German:1886. Reprinted with an introduction by Robert A. Sobieszek (Pawley: Helios, 1971) 
      
  18. Λ For a catalogue raisonné of the photographs of Julia Margaret Cameron - Julian Cox & Colin Ford, 2003, Julia Margaret Cameron: The Complete Photographs, (Los Angeles: Getty Publications)
     
    For the album Julia Margaret Cameron gave to her friend Sir John Herschel - Colin Ford, 1975, The Cameron Collection: An Album of Photographs by Julia Margaret Cameron Presented to Sir John Herschel, (Workingham, England: Van Nostrand Reinhold, in association with the National Portrait Gallery, London)
     
    Julia Margaret Cameron, 1874, Annals of My Glass House (Unfinished manuscript); Reprinted in full in - Violet Hamilton, 1996, Annals of my glass house: photographs by Julia Margaret Cameron, (Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery), p. 15; Also reprinted in - Beaumont Newhall, 1980, "Annals of my Glass House" IN, Photography: Essays and Images, (New York: Museum of Modern Art) 
      
  19. Λ Julia Margaret Cameron photographed Tennyson on multiple occassions with one of her photographs the "Dirty Monk", taken in 1865, being a particular favourite.
     
    Julia Margaret Cameron, "Alfred, Lord Tennyson (Dirty Monk)", 1865 (taken) 1893 (ca, print), Photogravure, 23.2 x 19.6 cm, Art Institute of Chicago, Gift of Mrs. James Ward Thorne, 1961.871c
     
    Julia Margaret Cameron, "Alfred Tennyson (The Dirty Monk)", 1865, Albumen print, Metropolitan Museum of Art David Hunter McAlpin Fund, 1966 
      
  20. Λ Alfred Lord Tennyson, 1874-1875, Idylls of the King and Other Poems, (London: Henry S. King & co.) [Two volumes. Photographic illustrations by Julia Margaret Cameron] 
      
  21. Λ Little Red Riding Hood is a popular European folktale - Aarne-Thompson classification system, no. 333; Jacques Berlioz, 2007, Il faut sauver Le petit chaperon rouge, (Les Collections de L'Histoire) no. 36, p. 63 
      
  22. Λ Photographic Exhibitions in Britain 1839-1865 - Created by Roger Taylor
    (Accessed: 3 November 2013)
    peib.dmu.ac.uk/ 
      
  23. Λ Paul Benton and John H. Hewlett, 1944, Surgery Through the Ages: A Pictorial Chronicle, (New York: Hasting House) [photographs by Lejaren ŕ Hiller.] 
      

alan@luminous-lint.com

 
  

HomeContents > Further research

 
  
Readings on, or by, individual photographers 
  
David Wilkie Wynfield 
  
Hacking, Juliet, 2000, Princes of Victorian Bohemia, (Prestel) isbn-10: 3791323016 isbn-13: 978-3791323015 [Δ
  
 
  
If you feel this list is missing a significant book or article please let me know - Alan - alan@luminous-lint.com 
  

HomeContentsPhotographers > Photographers worth investigating

 
Achille Bonnuit  (check) • Julia Margaret Cameron  (1815-1879) • Lewis Carroll  (1832-1898) • F. Holland Day  (1864-1933) • James Elliott • Lady Clementina Hawarden  (1822-1865) • Lejaren ŕ Hiller  (1880-1969) • Hisaji Hara  (1964-) • Oscar Gustave Rejlander  (1813-1875) • Guido Rey  (1861-1935) • Henry Peach Robinson  (1830-1901) • Alfred Silvester • David Wilkie Wynfield  (1837-1887)
HomeThemesArt > Tableau vivant 
A wider gazeRelated topics 
  
Performance art 
Staged photography 
 
  

HomeContentsOnline exhibitions > Tableau vivant

Please submit suggestions for Online Exhibitions that will enhance this theme.
Alan - alan@luminous-lint.com

 
  
Thumbnail19th Century Tableau vivant 
Title | Lightbox | Checklist
Released (May 29, 2010)
ThumbnailLady Clementina Hawarden 
Title | Lightbox | Checklist
Released (March 7, 2007)
 
  

HomeVisual indexes > Tableau vivant

Please submit suggestions for Visual Indexes to enhance this theme.
Alan - alan@luminous-lint.com

 
  
   Photographer 
  
ThumbnailHisaji Hara: A Photographic Portrayal Paintings of Balthus 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailJosef Jindrich Šechtl and Ignác Šechtl: Living statues 
ThumbnailLejaren ŕ Hiller: Surgery through the Ages 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
 
 
  
   Still thinking about these... 
  
ThumbnailBluebeard's Wives 
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Refreshed: 13 October 2014, 12:54
 
  
 
  
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