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HomeContentsThemes > Paris

Contents

Daguerreotypes
192.01   Daguerreotypes: Paris
192.02   Daguerreotypes: Paris: Notre-Dame
192.03   Paris et ses Environs Reproduits par le Daguerrotype, Sous la Direction de M. Ch. Philipon (Paris: Chez Aubert et Cie, 1840)
Daguerreotypomania
192.04   Daguerreotypomania
Henry Fox Talbot in Paris
192.05   Henry Fox Talbot: France: Paris
Notre Dame
192.06   France: Paris - Notre Dame
192.07   France: Paris - Notre Dame, Facade
192.08   France: Paris - Notre Dame, La Porte Rouge
Locations
192.09   Paris: Arc de Triomphe
192.10   Paris: Bois de Boulogne
192.11   Paris: Eiffel Tower
192.12   Paris: Hôtel de Ville
192.13   Paris: Les Halles
192.14   Paris: Montmartre
192.15   Paris: Pantheon
192.16   Paris: Place du Concorde
192.17   Paris: Place Vendôme
192.18   Paris: Pont Neuf
192.19   Paris: Saint-Cloud
192.20   Paris: The Louvre
192.21   Paris: The Seine
192.22   Paris: Tuileries
The Year of Revolutions (1848)
192.23   Year of Revolutions (1848): France - Paris
Édouard Baldus
192.24   Édouard Baldus: Paris
Charles Marville
192.25   Charles Marville: Paris
Nadar - Above and below Paris
192.26   Nadar: Balloon flights
192.27   Nadar: Catacombs and subterranean Paris (1860s)
The construction of the Paris Opera
192.28   Louis-Emile Durandelle: The Paris Opera (1861-1875)
Franco-Prussian War (1870-1871)
192.29   René Patrice Proudhon Dagron: Photomicrographs, carrier-pigeons and the beseiged city of Paris during the Franco-Prussian War (1870-1871)
The Paris Commune (1871)
192.30   Paris Commune (1871): Introduction
192.31   Paris Commune (1871): Photographs of wanted and dead communards
192.32   Paris Commune (1871): Destruction of the Vendome Column
192.33   Paris Comme Album (1871)
Railways of Paris
192.34   Construction du Chemin de Fer Metropolitan Municipal de Paris (1905-1910)
Eugène Atget
192.35   Eugène Atget: The streets and buildings of Paris
192.36   Eugène Atget: Street photography
192.37   Eugène Atget: Window displays
Amateur photography and snapshots
192.38   Grabriel Loppé: Paris by night
192.39   Photograph album - An Unknown Street Photographer in Paris (1896)
Social life
192.40   Brassaï: Paris de nuit: Book covers
192.41   The social life of Paris
Streets of Paris
192.42   Robert Doisneau: Humanistic photography
192.43   André Kertész: Street photography in Paris
192.44   Harold Chapman: Paris
This theme includes example sections and will be revised and added to as we proceed. Suggestions for additions, improvements and the correction of factual errors are always appreciated.
 
  
Daguerreotypes 
  
192.01   Europe >  Daguerreotypes: Paris 
  
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It should not be surprising that as the daguerreotype was first announced in Paris that it was exceptionally well documented in the early days of photography.[1]
 
Daguerreotypists photographing in Paris included:
Vincent Chevalier
Choiselat & Ratel
Louis Jacques Mandé Daguerre
Armand Hippolyte Fizeau
Jean-Baptiste-Louis Gros
Paul Michel Hossard
Noël Marie Paymal Lerebours
M. Thibault
This listing is an indication of some daguerreotypists worthy of further research and no more than that.[2] 
  
192.02   Europe >  Daguerreotypes: Paris: Notre-Dame 
  
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192.03   Europe >  Paris et ses Environs Reproduits par le Daguerrotype, Sous la Direction de M. Ch. Philipon (Paris: Chez Aubert et Cie, 1840) 
  
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The book Paris et ses environs : reproduits par le daguerreotype[3] (1840) includes tinted lithographs of Paris and Versailles.[4] 
  
Daguerreotypomania 
  
192.04   Europe >  Daguerreotypomania 
  
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In December 1839 Théodore Maurisset (1803-1860) created a lithograph cartoon entitled La Daguerréotypomanie[5] or "Daguerreotypomania" which captures the popular craze for the Daguerreotype in the months that followed its announcement:
 
The Library of Congress description sums up the chaos displayed in the scene:
French cartoon about the rush to try photography after Louis Jacques Mandé Daguerre revealed his process in 1839. Print shows long lines of people waiting to be photographed and others eager to support the craze by providing training and a vast array of photographic equipment. Several men hanging from gallows, "Potences a louer pour MM les graveurs," represent the death of art in the birth of photography. A balloon hovers in the air with a large camera as its basket.[6]
 
  
Henry Fox Talbot in Paris 
  
192.05   Europe >  Henry Fox Talbot: France: Paris 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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on 22 May 1843 Henry Fox Talbot wrote to his mother from the Hotel de Douvres in Paris[7] and in a letter he noted that he had a circular sitting room. It was from this room that he took his photograph View of the Boulevards of Paris which was a plate he included in The Pencil of Nature[8] Fox Talbot later wrote of this photograph.
This view was taken from one of the upper windows of the Hotel de Douvres, situated at the corner of the Rue de la Paix. The spectator is looking to the North-east. The time is the afternoon. The sun is just quitting the range of buildings adorned with columns: its facade is already in the shade, but a single shutter standing open projects far enough forward to catch a gleam of sunshine. The weather is hot and dusty, and they have just been watering the road, which has produced two broad bands of shade upon it, which unite in the foreground, because, the road being partially under repair (as is seen from the two wheelbarrows, &c. &c.), the watering machines have been compelled to cross to the other side.
 
By the roadside a row of cittadines and cabriolets are waiting, and a single carriage stands in the distance a long way to the right.
 
A whole forest of chimneys borders the horizon: for, the instrument chronicles whatever it sees, and certainly would delineate a chimney-pot or a chimney-sweeper with the same impartiality as it would the Apollo of Belvedere.
 
The view is taken from a considerable height, as appears easily by observing the house on the right hand; the eye being necessarily on a level with that part of the building on which the horizontal lines or courses of stone appear parallel to the margin of the picture.[9]
Fox Talbot took another photograph of the same location at street level[10] and another photograph close by at Boulevard des Italiennes.[11] 
  
Notre Dame 
  
192.06   Europe >  France: Paris - Notre Dame 
  
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192.07   Europe >  France: Paris - Notre Dame, Facade 
  
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The facade of Notre Dame in Paris has been preserved as daguerreotypes by Noël Marie Paymal Lerebours (ca. 1840) and Joseph-Philibert Girault de Prangey (1841), paper negatives by Henri Le Secq (1851-1860), a salt print by Charles Nègre (1853) and albumen prints by Gustave Le Gray (ca. 1858), Francis Frith (ca. 1865) and Édouard Baldus (ca. 1865), and a carbon print by Adolphe Braun (ca. 1880). These are a selection of nineteenth century photographs but there will be many more.
 
The construction of the facade began in 1200 and the North Tower (to the left) was completed in 1240 and the South Tower (to the right) ten years later. The rose window in the centre is an impressive 9.6 metres in diameter and acts seemingly as a halo for a statue of the Virgin with Child. Statues of the Kings of Judea and France were there until monarchies and monarchists were despised during French Revolution. Beneath this monumental facade are the three portals.
 
Each of the photographers has showed similar compositional choices. They work with the vertical frame, they center the subject, most allow a separation between the tops of the two towers and the top of the photograph. These photographs are not tilted, they are not showing sections of the facade and the harmony of the whole is there - no experimentation with composition was necessary or desirable when photographing an architectural icon. There is a beauty and inherent conservativism within the images. 
  
192.08   Europe >  France: Paris - Notre Dame, La Porte Rouge 
  
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Each architectural feature of a significant building such as the Porte Rouge at Notre Dame in Paris has a temporal sequence of photographs that show not only how the feature has changed but how photographic techniques have changed along with stylistic approaches. The daguerreotype by Joseph-Philibert Girault de Prangey (1841) is the same subject as the salt print by Charles Marville taken a decade later and that is different from the albumen prints by Bisson frères (ca. 1856) and Auguste Rosalie Bisson (ca. 1865).
 
In a magazine article "Why do we like Paris?" that was published in May 1878 in Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science a description of the Porte Rouge was given:
One of the most beautiful bits of Notre Dame is the Porte Rouge on the north side, which may be translated the "Door of Blood," and which was built by John the Fearless, duke of Burgundy, in expiation of the murder of the duke of Orleans in 1407. The valor and other princely qualities of Jean sans Peur and the odious character of his victim, who was the very curse of France, bias us in favor of the former notwithstanding the treachery of his deed. Their enmity had been bitter and of long standing, but they met for formal and public reconciliation, attended mass and received the sacrament together, and ended the day by a banquet. On his way home the duke of Orleans was surrounded and assassinated: the story goes that one wrapped in a mantle and scarlet hood, so as to conceal his face and figure, suddenly came out of a house and struck the final, fatal blow, and that this was the duke of Burgundy. The duke of Orleans had offered him an unpardonable insult by placing the likeness of the duchess of Burgundy among the portraits of his mistresses. It is further said that the duke of Burgundy had received intelligence of a plot to assassinate himself, and merely got the start of his foe. His atonement was splendid, according to the notions of those times. About ten years afterward he paid the natural penalty of his great crime, and was slain in his turn on the bridge of Montereau during a parley with the dauphin, afterward Charles VII. His tomb is at Dijon, the place of his birth, beside that of his father, Philippe le Hardi; his duchess Margaret lies by his side coroneted and in daisy-sprinkled robe; around the base of the monument troops of little monks mourn the death of their prince with every demonstration of grief. But under the rich Gothic canopy which forms the porch of the Porte Rouge the duke and duchess of Burgundy kneel in perpetual repentance amid a crowd of divine and sacred figures.[12]
 
  
Locations 
  
192.09   Europe >  Paris: Arc de Triomphe 
  
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The Arc de Triomphe in Paris was commissioned in 1806 after Napoleon's victory at Austerlitz and inaugurated in 1836.[13] A contemporary source said:
... the Arch of Triumph, commenced under Napoleon, and finished under Louis Philippe. It is copied from that class of monuments, commemorative of military glory, which yet survive the desolation of ancient Rome, such as the Arch of Septimius, and of Constantine; and which, while they convey to future eyes the memory of the great feats they record in almost living sculpture, are among the noblest embellishments with which a capitol can be adorned.[14]
 
  
192.10   Europe >  Paris: Bois de Boulogne 
  
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192.11   Europe >  Paris: Eiffel Tower 
  
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192.12   Europe >  Paris: Hôtel de Ville 
  
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192.13   Europe >  Paris: Les Halles 
  
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192.14   Europe >  Paris: Montmartre 
  
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192.15   Europe >  Paris: Pantheon 
  
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192.16   Europe >  Paris: Place du Concorde 
  
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192.17   Europe >  Paris: Place Vendôme 
  
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192.18   Europe >  Paris: Pont Neuf 
  
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192.19   Europe >  Paris: Saint-Cloud 
  
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Saint-Cloud is a commune in the western suburbs of Paris and was noted for the Château de Saint-Cloud which was destroyed in 1870 during the Franco-Prussian War (1870-1871) by French artillery and a resulting fire.[15] A salted paper print of the pristine gardens by Henri-Victor Regnault is in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.[16] in the early twentieth century the park of 460 hectares was photographed by Eugène Atget
  
192.20   Europe >  Paris: The Louvre 
  
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192.21   Europe >  Paris: The Seine 
  
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192.22   Europe >  Paris: Tuileries 
  
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The Year of Revolutions (1848) 
  
192.23   Europe >  Year of Revolutions (1848): France - Paris 
  
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In 1848 Paris was in a state of revolution and this was the period described by Victor Hugo (1802-1885) in his novel Les Miserables:
"In less than an hour twenty-seven barricades rose from the ground in the single quartier of the markets...The narrow, uneven, sinuous streets full of turns and corners, were admirably chosen; the environs of the markets in particular, a network of streets more intricate than a forest..."[17]
There are surviving photographs by Hippolyte Bayard (1801-1887)[18] of the remains of barricades in Rue Royale and two daguerreotypes by M. Thibault of those on Rue Saint-Maur-Popincourt set up during the 1848 revolution in Paris. The Thibault photograph secured it's place in history as being the first daguerrotype that was copied as an engraving[19] and published in L'Illustration on 1 July 1848 (nos 279-280, 1er-8 juillet 1848, p. 276.) with the title La barricade de la rue Saint-Maur-Popincourt le lundi après l'attaque, d'après une planche daguerréotypée par M. Thibault. When the Thibault daguerreotypes were sold at Sotheby's in 2002[20] they were claimed to be the first examples of photoreportage. 
  
Édouard Baldus 
  
192.24   Europe >  Édouard Baldus: Paris 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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Édouard Baldus (1813-1889)[21] is perhaps best known for his work with the Mission Héliographiques (1851)[22] documenting architectural monuments at risk within France and his work on the Édouard Baldus: Chemins de fer de Paris à Lyon et à la Méditerranée (1860s) in the 1860s. In addition to these Baldus documented the architectural monuments of Paris. Buildings such as La Bourse (The Stock Exchange), The Pantheon and Notre Dame were documented along woth monuments such as the Vendome Column and the L'Arc de Triomphe de l'Etoile. The rebuilding of parts of the Louvre was also an important subject for Baldus and he photographed it from the 1850s onwards. 
  
Charles Marville 
  
192.25   Europe >  Charles Marville: Paris 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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Charles Marville[23] as an official city photographer for Napoleon III took a series of about 425 images of the older roads of Paris that were to be destroyed by Baron Georges-Eugène Haussmann's[24] redesign of the city during the 1860s. Civil engineering on this scale in a bustling capital city was controversial as it involved the relocation of considerable numbers of citizens but it was viewed as an essential part of Napoleon III's modernisation of Paris through the construction of the grand boulevards.  
  
Charles Marville: The rebuilding of Paris 
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A further commission for Charles Marville was to document the street furniture of the city designed by architect Gabriel Davioud for Baron Haussmann. Marville made magnificent albumen prints of the newly installed gas lamps,[25] ironwork, pissoirs, Morris columns[26] for posting advertising, along the streets. When Paris installed gas lighting along the Champs De Elysees in 1828 it was the first European city to do so. The modernisation of under Baron Haussmann added 20,000 gas lamps[27] and Paris was indeed the "City of Light".  
  
Charles Marville: Gas lamps 
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Charles Marville: Colonne Morris 
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Charles Marville: Pissoirs 
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Charles Marville: Ironwork 
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   Charles  Marville 
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Nadar - Above and below Paris 
  
192.26   Europe >  Nadar: Balloon flights 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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Nadar's exploits with balloons were widely published as in the 15 October 1863 issue of The Photographic Journal being the Journal of the Photographic Society:
M. Nadar, a celebrated Parisian photographer, has distinguished himself as an aeronaut, and recently made an ascent, with about a dozen friends, in the largest balloon ever made. His balloon, called 'Le Géant,' is thus described in a daily contemporary: "The design of M. Nadar is to render aerial voyaging not only instructive, but pleasant; so he has constructed reading- and billiard-rooms, and a photographic studio, in addition to the usual living apartments. The car which contains these is two-storied, the upper floor being a terrace, surrounded by a strong railing, or garde-fous (absit omen !), from which, I presume, our travellers are to fish for birds, for M. Nadar is amply supplied with fishing tackle, which must either be intended for aerial sport, else as provision against their ' falling in the sea.'"[28]
The Encyclopaedia Britannica (1902) gave a detailed account:
Felix Nadar's Balloon
 
In 1863, Nadar, a well-known photographer at Paris, constructed an enormous balloon, which he called "Le Geant." It was the largest gas-balloon ever constructed, containing over 200,000 cubic feet of gas. Underneath it was placed a smaller balloon, called a compensator, the object of which was to prevent loss of gas during the voyage. The car had two stories, and was, in fact, a model of a cottage in wicker-work, 8 feet in height by 13 feet in length, containing a small printing --office, a photographic department, a refreshment room, a lavatory, &c., The first ascent took place at fve o'clock on Sunday, October 4, 1863, from the Champ de Mars. There were thirteen persons in the car, including one lady, the Princess de la Tour d"Auvergne, and the two aeronauts Louis and Jules Godard. In spite of the elaborate preparation that had been made and the stores of provisions that were taken up, the balloon descended at nine o'clock, at Meaux, the early descent being rendered necessary, it was said, by an accident to the valve-line. A second ascent was made a fortnight later, viz., on October 18; there were nine passengers, including Madam Nadar. The balloon descended at the expiration of seventeens hours, near Nienburg in Hanover, a distance of about 400 miles. A strong wind was blowing, and the balloon was dragged over the ground a distance of 7 or 8 miles. All the passengers were bruised, and some more seriously hurt. The balloon and car were then brought to England, and exhibited for some time at the Crystal Palace at the end of 1863 and beginning of 1864. The two ascents of Nadar's balloon excited an extraordinary amount of enthusiasm and interest, vastly out of proportion to what they were entitled to. The balloon was larger than any of the same kind that had previously ascended; but this was scarcely more than just appreciable to the eye, as the doubling the contents of a balloon makes comparatively slight addition to its diameter. M. Nadar's idea was to obtain sufficient money, by the exhibition of his balloon, to carry a plan of aerial locomotion he had conceived possible by means of the principle of the screw; in fact, he spoke of "Le Geant" as "the last balloon." He also started L'Aeronaute, a newspaper devoted to aerostation, and published a small book, which was translated into English under the title The Right to fly. Nadar's ascents had not the remotest connection with science, although he claimed that they had; nor was his knowledge, as shown in his writings, sufficient to have enabled him to advance it in any way.[29]
In the "Foreign Notes" section of Every Saturday on 9 June 1866 it was noted that Nadar was proposing that world transportation would be forever altered by human flight:
The various balloon experiments of M. Nader, the famous Parisian photographer, have resulted in a small volume, which the English translator styles, "The Right to Fly." M. Nader considers that all existing styles of locomotion will be deemed obsolete in a few years, when a more perfect system of aerostation shall have been discovered.[30]
 
  
192.27   Europe >  Nadar: Catacombs and subterranean Paris (1860s) 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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Millions of skeletons were preserved in the vast catacombs under Paris[31] when well-known Parisian photographer Nadar photographed the subterranean world in 1861.[32] In 1862 Gustav Flaubert and the inseparable Goncourt brothers[33] visited the morbid location and wrote:
Bones so tidily stacked that they call to mind the wine cellars of Bercy. There is an administrative orderliness that removes all the drama from this library of skulls. What's worse, one must put up with all those Parisian jokers who go underground on veritable pleasure parties and amuse themselves by hurling taunts into the mouth of Nothingness; it makes one cringe.[34]
Nadar wrote in his memoirs:
You need to take only a few steps through these subterranean passages to satisfy your curiosity. It's one of those places that everybody wants to see and no one wants to see again.[35]
Nadar was right that no number of photographs or the way they were captured with electric light could get over the prosaic nature of the fact they are just large piles of bones at times artfully arranged and at other times in vast piles. There is a shock factor of the first image but beyond that it is more of the same.[36] 
  
The construction of the Paris Opera 
  
192.28   Europe >  Louis-Emile Durandelle: The Paris Opera (1861-1875) 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
  
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The construction of the new Opera House in Paris in the nineteenth century was a statement in quarried stone of civic and national pride. On 29 December 1860 a resolution was passed that commenced a competition for suitable designs and plans. The unanimously chosen winner was Charles Garnier and by July 1861 the site had been selected and the following month the excavation of the foundations commenced. This was far from an ideal time for new public works with both the Franco-Prussian War and the following dark times of the Paris Commune coinciding with the construction. Despite this Garnier completed the project by December 1874 and in January 1875 it opened:
The opening of the New Opera House at Paris took place on Tuesday last. The Government had engaged the entire house for the opening night, which was, therefore, a state festivity, to which the diplomatic corps, the deputies, &c, were invited. The regular performances were to commence last evening with Hamlet.[37]
This vast undertaking was described in a contemporary account as follows:
The historian of the new temple of song rounds off his record with an array of not uninteresting figures, and with a few of these I too shall close. The gas-pipes, if connected, would form a pipe twenty-five kilometres in length; fourteen furnaces and four hundred and fifty grates heat the house; a battery of seventy cups generates electricity for the scenic effects; nine reservoirs and two tanks hold a hundred thousand litres of water, and distribute their contents through six thousand nine hundred and eighteen metres of piping, and there are twenty-five hundred and thirty-one doors, and seven thousand five hundred and ninety-three keys, which latter M. Gamier delivered formally, but figuratively, I imagine, to M. Halanzier when the manager took possession of the premises.[38]
During the process Louis-Emile Durandelle photographed both the construction and the ornamental sculptures that decorated the immense building. Illustrations clearly based on Durandelle's photographs were published in Le Nouvel Opera de Paris par Charles Garnier (1875-81)[39] and in Charles Nuitter's, Le Nouvel Opera (1875)[40].  
  
Photographs by Louis-Emile Durandelle of the Paris Opera House and printed illustrations 
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The project remains as one of the key documentations of a nineteenth century architectural project. Durandelle recorded many other key projects in Paris including the construction of Sacre Coeur, the Hotel de Ville, and the Eiffel Tower
  
   Louis-Emile  Durandelle Paris Opera 
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Franco-Prussian War (1870-1871) 
  
192.29   Europe >  René Patrice Proudhon Dagron: Photomicrographs, carrier-pigeons and the beseiged city of Paris during the Franco-Prussian War (1870-1871) 
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René Patrice Proudhon Dagron[41] was a French chemist and photomicroscopist whose innovations in microscopy, lens design, and marketing created a popular craze in optical novelities - his Bijoux Photomicroscopiques[42] (better known as Stanhopes[43] or Peeps) from the late 1850s. Dagron had his own factory for photomicroscopy and during the Franco-Prussian War (1870-1871) he was ideally placed to create photo-messages that could be transported by carrier-pigeons in and out of the besieged city of Paris
  
The Paris Commune (1871) 
  
192.30   Europe >  Paris Commune (1871): Introduction 
  
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Following the Franco-Prussian War (1870-1871) the head of the French National Government, Adolph Thiers, had negotiated the terms of peace but the inhabitants of Paris, who had undergone a long siege, did not accept the German victory. A catalyst for widespread unrest was a planned triumphal entry into the city by the German army - the citizens rebelled and the Paris Commune[44][45] began on 18 March 1871. The struggles of the Parisian Communards was studied by Karl Marx in his 1871 pamphlet The Civil War in France.[46]
 
There remains a photographic record of the barricades, devastated streets and buildings and the dead communards. Most of the photographs are fairly uninteresting albumen prints but within the collections at Northwestern University Library there are some gems. Photographs also survive of the destruction of the Colonne Vendôme[47] on 16 May 1871 in Place Vendôme.[48]
 
In the week beginning 21 May 1871 there was brutal street fighting an an estimated 20,000-30,000 communards were killed or executed with many more being arrested. French newspapers, such as Le Monde illustré and L'Illustration, used photographs as the basis for their engravings. 
  
192.31   Europe >  Paris Commune (1871): Photographs of wanted and dead communards 
  
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Following the Paris Commune (1871) photographs of wanted communards were supplied to the Frontier police so they could be captured - this use of photographs to support political objectives where photojournalists are torn between taking images at demonstrations and the knowledge that their images will be used as a tool of oppression. 
  
192.32   Europe >  Paris Commune (1871): Destruction of the Vendome Column 
  
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192.33   Europe >  Paris Comme Album (1871) 
  
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This exhibition contains the title page and all the plates for the:

Album Photographique
des
Ruines de Paris
collection
de tous les monuments et édifices incendiés et détruits
par
La Commune de Paris
Accompagnee de Notices historique de descriptives sur chaque sujet

The album with 20 glued in albumen prints was published in Paris by Librairie rue Visconti, 22 with the price of 28 francs. The author who wrote the notes was Justin Lallier, septembre 1871. 
  
Railways of Paris 
  
192.34   Europe >  Construction du Chemin de Fer Metropolitan Municipal de Paris (1905-1910) 
  
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The ever-increasing need of urban growth were straining the transportation capacities of large cities through the nineteenth century. The railway companies had built lines between urban centers but within them there issue needed to be addressed. In 1883 the city of Paris decided to construct its own subway system to keep itself independent of the national railway system (Chemin de Fer de l'État ). "The Compagnie du chemin de fer métropolitain de Paris" was formed in 1899 to carry out the construction with the first line opening in 1900.[49] 
  
Eugène Atget 
  
192.35   Europe >  Eugène Atget: The streets and buildings of Paris 
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Eugène Atget is best known for his photographs late nineteenth and early twentieth century Paris that detail the streets, architecture, shops, parks and trees of the city.[50] He sold photographs to archives and museum and to artists who used them to develop their painting skills. He lived very close to Man Ray in Paris who knew his work and purchased prints. In his final years his work was promoted by Berenice Abbott[51] and the New York gallery owner Julian Levy
  
192.36   Europe >  Eugène Atget: Street photography 
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No matter how well-respected Eugène Atget is as a recorder of the streets and architecture of Paris his street photography of people does not stand up well. In most cases it is distant with the backs of a group or crowd where their attention is drawn away from the photographer. The distance between the subject and the camera might be a part of the equipment he used but is more likely to be about personal reserve and a level of comfort he had with the subject. Where individuals such as Joueur de Guitare [Guitar Player] (1900), a street vendor Marchard d'abat-jour, rue Lepic (1899-1900) or the Facteur [Postman] (ca. 1900) were taken they are posed rather than having the informality that was emerging with 1890s snapshots. Just as Atget's camera and technique was outdated so was his approach to street photography
  
192.37   Europe >  Eugène Atget: Window displays 
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Amateur photography and snapshots 
  
192.38   Europe >  Grabriel Loppé: Paris by night 
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192.39   Europe >  Photograph album - An Unknown Street Photographer in Paris (1896) 
  
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These photographs come from a small, olive green Kodak album with the handwritten inscription on the inside cover, "Paris, 1896". The size of the prints, 1½ x 2 inches, indicates they were taken with a Pocket Kodak Camera, first released the year before. There are 92 photographs in all.
 
So much for the technical information; the real value of this album is that it represents the work of an amateur street photographer during the very earliest years of snapshot photography. More than that, the composition of a lot of the images is enigmatic. It anticipates an aesthetic that didn’t become popular until the introduction of the SLR camera some thirty years later and it leads us to wonder whether some of the photographs are the accidents they first appear to be.
 
The photographer has left a few, spare clues about his identity. The shadow cast in one photograph indicates it is a man and from two images it appears he may have been wandering the streets in the company of a friend. The inscriptions written in faint pencil on the album pages are in French although we can’t assume that was his native language. Tourists often give the local names for landmarks. One thing seems certain; though he may have been an amateur by inclination, his eye for photography is sophisticated, suggesting previous experience, a background in visual arts or at the least, a natural affinity.
 
A sizeable number of photographs in the album have to do with motion; bicyclists, horse drawn buggies and pedestrians hurrying through the streets. In December the previous year the Lumiére brothers had given the first public exhibition of their cinematograph and Etienne Jules Marey was still perfecting chronophotographic cameras. Capturing motion was constantly discussed in photographic journals and in newspapers and though no capable high speed cameras were commercially available in 1896, they were an inevitability. The new Pocket Kodak had a shutter speed of 1 1/25 of a second, still not fast enough to eliminate blur but it was small and light enough to exert some control over the image. As the photographer strolled through the Bois de Boulogne and snapped at bicyclists, he was as interested in experimenting with the possibilities of his new camera as he was in documenting city life.
 
Most amateur photo albums contain at least one image with an exact and revelatory composition that holds our attention. Generally we put that down to coincidence, but with this album the composition in so many images is carefully considered. Take, for example No. 14, a woman pushing a pram. The balance and pattern of the image, with the baby’s head placed under the dome and the woman at the centre is very neat. It appears as though the photographer saw the image materializing, perhaps as she was a few metres away, and positioned himself, steadying the camera against his chest and watching for the moment through the viewfinder.
 
With other images he intrudes, pushing his camera as close as possible without attracting obvious attention. In one of the most mysterious images (No. 19), a woman’s face is cropped neatly in half, the Pont Royal in the background. We could accept this as a lucky accident but the same apparent haphazardness is found in other images and on closer view they all reveal a harmony in the composition that begins to look deliberate. In the photograph of several men sitting on park benches (No. 25), the man in the right foreground is cropped, again, in half. The whole shape of the photograph leads towards the top hatted figure at the rear but it’s the hand on the silver topped cane that draws us back. In No. 24, another photographer (his friend?) is shot adjusting his camera. His head is cut off. Had a photographer like Andre Kertesz taken this in the 1930s we’d get the pun immediately and talk about it in terms of vision and identity. Only the date and this photographer’s anonymity prevent us from thinking he may have been making the same point.
 
Other photographs evoke Walker Evans’ streetscapes and (not surprisingly) J. H Lartigue’s juvenile snapshots[52]. Looking at the album in its entirety, it’s clear that although he has photographed many landmarks, the photographer is less interested in Paris as a subject than in the possibilities it offers for exploring something more intangible. If not an artist by profession, he was by disposition.
 
John Toohey (August 2009) 
  
   19thc Souvenir Albums 
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Social life 
  
192.40   Europe >  Brassaï: Paris de nuit: Book covers 
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Night photography had been used by Alfred Stieglitz for his some photographs in his series "Picturesque Bits of New York and Other Studies" (1897) but they were still relatively rare. When Brassaï ventured through the streets of Paris at night he was an outsider to the city. He had arrived in Paris in 1924 and met another Hungarian André Kertész who acted as a kind of mentor. Their styles were distinct however - Kertész was largely, but not entirely[53], concerned with the shapes of the natural world and social interaction - Brassaï was more drawn to the underbelly of the city, the mystery of graffiti and the night. He used his camera to capture a world rarely seen in Paris de Nuit which came out in a French edition[54] and an English edition in 1933.[55] Surrealism took the concealed world as one of its themes and death, abattoirs and the night with its shielded cloak of sin was worthy of exploration. In 1935 the Surrealist magazine Minotaure included Brassaï's photographs of Paris at night in the article "Nuits parisienne".[56] 
  
192.41   Europe >  The social life of Paris 
  
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Streets of Paris 
  
192.42   Europe >  Robert Doisneau: Humanistic photography 
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Robert Doisneau (1912-1994) was an outstanding Parisian street photographer who explored everyday moments within public space.[57] Joyful moments of children doing handstands, a balloon seller (Le Garde et les Ballons, a couple waltzing in the street at night (La Dernier Valse du Juillet 14, Paris) or a sneaky look at a nude painting Un regard Oblique are what made his body of work both touching and approachable. Later in his career his work would have to be reassessed when it was revealed that one of his most famous photographs Le Basier de L'Hotel de Ville (1950) used hired participants. Despite the controversy over this incident Robert Doisneau's photographs have become a significant part of French visual culture. 
  
192.43   Europe >  André Kertész: Street photography in Paris 
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André Kertész was Hungarian by birth[58] and arrived in Paris in September 1925 at a time of immense cultural ferment. He was one of a group of Hungarian photographers who were active in France including François Kollar, Robert Capa, Emeric Fehér, Brassaï, Julia Bathory. Man Ray, Germaine Krull and Lucien Aigner. He stayed in Paris and worked for numerous magazines including Vu, Le Sourire, Arts et Métiers Graphiques and Art et Médecine. His work during this period of street photography of the inter-war period was a significant element in his overall work.[59] As war became more likely Kertész left France in 1936 to settle in New York
  
192.44   Europe >  Harold Chapman: Paris 
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Harold Chapman said during an interview in December 1968:
"...there is no need for the contrived shot. Pictures are everywhere. So why set up a photograph when the natural one is infinitely better?" He added: "I am photographing for the future, not for the present... All I aim for is to record the trivial things that ordinary people use and consider unimportant."
 
  
   Harold  Chapman 
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Footnotes 
  
  1. Λ Musee Carnavalet, 1989, Paris et le daguerreotype, (Paris-Musees) 
      
  2. Λ If an exhaustive listing of daguerreotypists who took images of Paris does exist please let me know - alan@luminous-lint.com 
      
  3. Λ  Charles Philipon; Auguste Auvial; Paul de La Garenne; Victor Ratier; Jean Baptiste Arnout; et al, 1840, Paris et ses environs : reproduits par le daguerre´otype, ( Paris : Chez Aubert et cie., e´diteurs, marchands d'estampes et imprimeurs - Paris : Imprime´ par Be´thune et Plon) 
      
  4. Λ Included on "Books illustrated with lithographs or engravings after daguerreotypes or with prints from etched daguerreotypes" in Helmut and Alison Gernsheim, 1956, L.J.M. Daguerre (1787-1851), (Cleveland: World Pub. Co.), p. 190.
     
    For a useful list of early publications that used, or purportedly used, daguerreotypes see - Beaumont Newhall & Robert Doty, 1962, "The Value of Photography to the Artist, 1839", Image (George Eastman House), vol. 11, no. 6, pp. 25-28 
      
  5. Λ Copies of the lithograph are preserved in numerous collections including George Eastman House, J. Paul Getty Museum (84.XP.983.28) and the Library of Congress (Prints and Photographs Division, Digital ID: ppmsca.02343). 
      
  6. Λ Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Digital ID: ppmsca.02343 
      
  7. Λ The Correspondence of William Henry Fox Talbot - Document number: 4825
    Recipient: Elisabeth Theresa Feilding, née Fox Strangways, Author: William Henry Fox Talbot
    (Accessed: 2 June 2014)
    foxtalbot.dmu.ac.uk 
      
  8. Λ Reproduced in Larry J. Schaaf, 1989, H. Fox Talbot's The Pencil of Nature; Anniversary Facsimile, (New York: Hans P. Kraus, Jr. Inc.), Part 1, pl. 2 
      
  9. Λ H. Fox Talbot, 1844, The Pencil of Nature, (London: Longman, Brown, Green and Longmans). Also in Larry J. Schaaf, 1989, H. Fox Talbot's The Pencil of Nature; Anniversary Facsimile, (New York: Hans P. Kraus, Jr. Inc.), Part 1, pl. 2 
      
  10. Λ For a copy of this plate - Henry Fox Talbot, "The Boulevards at Paris [Previous Title: View of the Boulevards at Paris]", 1843, May-June, Salted paper print from paper negative, 15.1 x 19.9 cm (5 15/16 x 7 13/16 ins), Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gilman Collection, Purchase, The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation Gift, through Joyce and Robert Menschel, 2005, Accession Number: 2005.100.609 
      
  11. Λ For this plate see - Henry Fox Talbot, "Boulevard des Italiennes, Paris", 1843, May, Salted paper print, from a Calotype negative, 16.8 x 17.3 cm (6 5/8 x 6 13/16 in), J. Paul Getty Museum, Object number: 84.XM.478.6 
      
  12. Λ "Why do we like Paris?", 1878, May, Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, vol. 23, p. 528 
      
  13. Λ Arc de Triomphe - Wkipedia
    (Accessed: 2 June 2014)
    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arc_de_Triomphe 
      
  14. Λ Lewis Cass, 1840, France: Its King, Court and Government, (Wiley & Putnam), p. 160 
      
  15. Λ F.H. Norton, 26 November 1870, "Saint-Cloud", Appletons Journal of Popular Literature, Science, and Art, vol. IV, no. 87, pp. 639-640 
      
  16. Λ Henri-Victor Regnault, [Gardens of Saint-Cloud], 1855 (before), Salted paper print, from paper negative, 41 x 35.7 cm (16 1/8 x 14 1/16 ins), Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gilman Collection, Gift of The Howard Gilman Foundation, 2005, Accession Number: 2005.100.39 
      
  17. Λ Victor Hugo, 1862, Les Misérables, (Carleton), vol. 2, pts. 3-5 , p. 347 
      
  18. Λ Eugenia Parry (introduction), 2010, Hippolyte Bayard, (Daniel Blau) [Edition of 1000] 
      
  19. Λ This statement requires verification. 
      
  20. Λ Sotheby's in London (Thursday, 9 May 2002) 
      
  21. Λ Malcolm R. Daniel, 1994, The Photographs of Édouard Baldus, (New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art; Montreal: Canadian Centre for Architecture)
     
    He is commonly referred to as "Edouard-Denis Baldus" but there is no trace of this name having been used during his lifetime. He was born "Eduard" and adopted the French spelling "Edouard" after moving to Paris. [Thanks to Malcolm Daniel for this information.] 
      
  22. Λ Philippe Néagu et al., 1980, La Mission Héliographique: Photographies de 1851. (Paris: Inspection Générale des Musées Classés et Contrôlés), Exhibition catalogue; Anne de Mondenard, 2002, La Mission Héliographique: Cinq photographes parcourent la France en 1851, (Paris: Centre des Monuments Nationaux) 
      
  23. Λ For Charles Marville and Paris - Jacqueline Chambord (ed.), 1981, Charles Marville: Photographs of Paris, 1852-1878, (French Inst/Alliance Francaise); Charles Marville, 1994, Marville Paris, (Hazan); Charles Marville, 1997, Charles Marville, (Centre National de Photo)
     
    The work of Charles Marville is highly regarded and exhibitions of his work are mounted such as - "Charles Marville: Photographer of Paris" (The Metropoltan Museum of Art, NY, 29 January - 4 May 2014) 
      
  24. Λ For the work of Baron Haussmann and the urban design of Paris - Stephane Kirkland, 2013 , Paris Reborn: Napoléon III, Baron Haussmann, and the Quest to Build a Modern City, (St. Martin's Griffin); Patrick Camiller & Michel Carmona, 2002, Haussmann: His Life and Times, and the Making of Modern Paris, (Ivan R Dee) 
      
  25. Λ For the public lighting photographed by Charles Marville - Marie de Thézy, 1993, Charles Marville: Réverberes, (Paris: Paris Tête d'Affiche) 
      
  26. Λ In France advertising columns are called Colonne Morris taking their name from Gabriel Morris, a printer, who held the concession for advertising in 1868.
    (Accessed: 4 April 2014)
    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Advertising_column 
      
  27. Λ "Charles Marville: Photographer of Paris" (The Metropoltan Museum of Art, NY, 29 January - 4 May 2014)
    (Accessed: 4 April 2014)
    www.metmuseum.org/en/exhibitions/listings/2014/charles-marville 
      
  28. Λ 15 October 1863, The Photographic Journal being the Journal of the Photographic Society, no. 138, p. 383 
      
  29. Λ 9 June, 1866, "Foreign Notes", Every Saturday, vol. vI, no. 23, p. 643 
      
  30. Λ 1902, "Felix Nadar's Balloon", Encyclopaedia Britannica, 10th Edition 
      
  31. Λ Les Catacombes - Histoire de Paris
    (Accessed: 13 February 2014)
    www.catacombes.paris.fr 
      
  32. Λ Felix Nadar, 1982, Le Paris Souterrain de Félix Nadar 1861, (Caisse nationale des monuments historiques et des sites) [catalogue conçu par Philippe Néagu et Jean-Jacques Poulet-Allamagny ; présentation conçue par Jean Barrou avec la collaboration de Jean-Jacques Poulet-Allamagny]. 
      
  33. Λ Edmond de Goncourt (1822–96) and Jules de Goncourt (1830–70), French authors and diarists. See: Edmond de Goncourt & Jules de Goncourt, 2006,Pages from the Goncourt Journals , (New York Review Books Classics). Versions of their journals are available online. 
      
  34. Λ Goncourt brothers quoted in - Françoise Heilbrun; Philippe Néagu & Paul Neagu, Nadar, (Metropolitan Museum of Art), p. 99 
      
  35. Λ Quoted in - Françoise Heilbrun; Philippe Néagu & Paul Neagu, Nadar, (Metropolitan Museum of Art), p. 100 
      
  36. Λ The same applies to the photographs of the ash-covered corpses from Pompeii and the catacombs of Palermo. A few examples are sufficient to get a sense of the whole. 
      
  37. Λ The Academy, Issue 7, Jan 9, 1875, p. 51 
      
  38. Λ Frederick A. Schwab, "A Temple of Song", Scribners Monthly, May, 1875, Volume X, no. 1, p. 20 
      
  39. Λ 1875-81, Le Nouvel Opera de Paris par Charles Garnier, (Paris: Ducher et Cie) 
      
  40. Λ Charles Nuitter, 1875, Le Nouvel Opera (Paris: Libraire Hachette et Cie) 
      
  41. Λ R.P.P. Dagron, 1864, ‘Microscopic photography‘, British Journal of Photography, pp. 402; R.P.P. Dagron, 1864, Traité de Photographie Microscopique, (Paris) 
      
  42. Λ René Dragon,1862, Cylindres photo-microscopiques, montés et non montés sur bijoux brevetés en France et l'étranger [36 pages] 
      
  43. Λ Douglas Jull, 1997, Collecting Stanhopes, (D.S. Publications); Jean Scott, 2002, Stanhopes: A Closer View - A History and Handbook for Collectors of Microphotographic Novelties, (Greenlight Publishing); Bobbi London, 2013, ‘Stanhopes: A Package Deal‘, in Bryan & Page Ginns, 2013, Antique Photographica: The Collector's Vision (Schiffer), pp. 164-182; 
      
  44. Λ Quentin Bajac, Alisa Luxemberg, Denis Pellerin & Stéphanie Sotteau, 2000, La Commune photographiée (Réunion des musées nationaux) [Exhibition catalogue, 14 March - 11 June 2000, Musée d'Orsay] 
      
  45. Λ Alistair Horne, 1971, The terrible year; the Paris Commune 1871, (Viking Press); Alistair Horne, 2007, The Fall of Paris: The Siege and the Commune 1870-71 (Penguin) [Reprint] 
      
  46. Λ Karl Marx, 1871, The Civil War in France
    [A 35 page pamphlet that went through multiple editions.] Online: www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1871/civil-war-france/index.htm 
      
  47. Λ La Colonne Vendôme déboulonnée [French]
    www.histoire-image.org/site/etude_comp/etude_comp_detail.php?analyse_id=60 
      
  48. Λ en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Place_Vend%C3%B4me 
      
  49. Λ Albums on the construction of the Chemin de fer métropolitain municipal de Paris
     
    Vol. 1: gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b1200063n
    Vol. 2: gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b1200061t
    Vol. 3: gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b1200068q 
      
  50. Λ There are a large number of monographs on Eugène Atget and the standard by which all others are judged are the four volumes published by the Museum of Modern Art (1981-1985):
    John Szarkowski & Maria Morris Hambourg, 1981, The Work of Atget. vol. 1: Old France, (New York: Museum of Modern Art)
     
    John Szarkowski & Maria Morris Hambourg, 1982, The Work of Atget. vol. II: The Art of Old Paris, (New York: Museum of Modern Art)
     
    John Szarkowski & Maria Morris Hambourg, 1983, The Work of Atget. vol. III: The Ancien Regime, (New York: Museum of Modern Art)
     
    John Szarkowski & Maria Morris Hambourg, 1985, The Work of Atget. vol. IV: Modern Times, (New York: Museum of Modern Art)
     
      
  51. Λ Clark Worswick, 2002, Berenice Abbott & Eugene Atget, (Santa Fe: Arena Editions) 
      
  52. Λ Jacques-Henri Lartigue, 1966, Boyhood Photos of J. H. Lartigue: The Family Album of a Gilded Age, (Lausanne, Switzerland: Ami Guichard); Martine D’Astier, Quentin Bajac & Alain Saya, 2003, Lartigue: Album of a Century, (New York: Harry N. Abrams) 
      
  53. Λ The distortions series of André Kertész may be a deeper look at humanity but they may be just visual tricks with little deeper meaning.
     
    Twelve distortions by André Kertész was published in Frech satirical magazine Le Sourire, 12 March 1933.
     
    André Kertész, 1976, Distortions, (Paris, Editions du Chêne) 
      
  54. Λ Brassaï & Paul Morand, 1933, Paris de Nuit, (Editions " Arts et métiers graphiques, coll. "Réalités"). The text was by Paul Morand and it included 60 photographs by Brassaï. 
      
  55. Λ Brassaï & Paul Morand, 1933, Paris de Nuit / Paris After Dark, (Paris: Arts et Métiers Graphiques / London: B.T. Batsford Ltd.) 
      
  56. Λ Brassaï, 1935, "Nuits parisiennes", Minotaure, no. 7 
      
  57. Λ There are many books by Robert Doisneau and an overview of life - Peter Hamilton, 1995, Robert Doisneau: A Photographer’s Life, (New York: Abbeville Press) 
      
  58. Λ André Kertész was born on 2 July 1894 in in Budapest when it was part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. 
      
  59. Λ André Kertész, 1945, Day of Paris, (New York: J.J. Augustin); André Kertész, 1974, J’aime Paris: Photographs Since the Twenties, (New York: Grossman Publishers); Sandra S. Phillips, 1985, André Kertész: Of Paris and New York, (Chicago: Art Institute of Chicago) 
      

alan@luminous-lint.com

 
  

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General reading 
  
Janis, Eugenia Parry, 1986, ‘Demolition Picturesque: Photographs of Paris in 1852 and 1853 by Henri Le Secq‘, in Peter Welch & Thomas F. Barrow (eds.), 1986, Perspectives on Photography: Essays in Honor of Beaumont Newhall, (Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press), pp. 53 [Δ
  
McCauley, Elizabeth Anne, 1994, Industrial Madness: Commercial Photography in Paris 1848-1871, (New Haven: Yale University Press) [Δ
  
Musee Carnavalet, 1989, Paris et le daguerreotype, (Paris-Musees) isbn-10: 2901414362 isbn-13: 978-2901414360 [French] [Δ
  
Philipon, Ch., 1840, Paris et ses Environs Reproduits par le Daguerrotype, Sous la Direction de M. Ch. Philipon, (Paris: Chez Aubert et Cie) [Δ
  
Pinkney, David H., 1972, Napoleon III and the Rebuilding of Paris, (Princeton University Press) isbn-10: 0691007683 isbn-13: 978-0691007687 [Δ
  
Reynaud, Francoise; Tamburn, Catherine & Timby, Kim (eds.), 2000, Paris in 3D: From Stereoscopy to Virtual Reality 1850-2000, (Paris musees / Booth-Clibborn Editions) isbn-10: 1861541627 isbn-13: 978-1861541628 [Δ
  
Walker, Ian, 2002, City Gorged with Dreams: Surrealism and Documentary Photography in Interwar Paris, (Manchester University Press) isbn-10: 0719062152 isbn-13: 9780719062155 [Δ
  
 
  
Readings on, or by, individual photographers 
  
Eugène Atget 
  
Abbott, Berenice, 1963, Eugène Atget, (Prague: S.N.K.L.U.) [Δ
  
Abbott, Berenice, 1964, The World of Atget, (New York: Horizon Press) [Δ
  
Atget & Proust, 2012, Paris du temps perdu, (Paris: Editions Hoëbeke) [Δ
  
Atget, Eugène, 1930, Atget: Photographe de Paris, (New York: E. Weyhe) [Δ
  
Atget, Eugène, 1930, E. Atget: Lichtbilder, (Paris and Leipzig: Verlag Henri Jonquithres) [Δ
  
Atget, Eugène, 1963, A Vision of Paris, (New York: MacMillan) [Δ
  
Atget, Eugène, 1975, Atget: Lichtbilder, (Munich: Rogner and Bernhard) [Δ
  
Atget, Eugène, 1979, Atget: Voyages en Ville, (Paris: Chêne/ Hachette) [Δ
  
Atget, Eugène, 1979, Eugène Atget, (Milan: Electa Editrice) [Δ
  
Atget, Eugène, 1981, Atget's Vision, (Chicago: Edwynn Houk Gallery) [Δ
  
Atget, Eugène, 1982, Eugène Atget 1857-1927: Intérieurs Parisiens, Photographies, (Paris: Musée Carnavalet) [Δ
  
Atget, Eugène, 1983, Eugene Atget, I Grandi Fotografi Serie Aergento, (Gruppo Editoriale Fabri) [Δ
  
Atget, Eugène, 1984, Atget, Géniaux, Vert: Petits Métiers et Types Parisiens, vers 1900, (Paris: Musée Carnavalet) [Δ
  
Atget, Eugène, 2001, Eugène Atget: Miroirs: Daniel Quesney: Reconstitution Photographique, (Brussels: ARP Editions) [Δ
  
Atget, Eugène, 2002, Atget: L'art décoratif, (Paris: Flammarion) [Δ
  
Atget, Eugène, 2004, Eugène Atget: The Art of Old Paris, (Seoul: Kim Young Seob Photo Gallery) [Δ
  
Atget, Eugène, 2008, Atget à Sceaux: Inventaire avant disparitions, (Paris: Somogy Editions d'Art) [Δ
  
Atget, Eugène, 2011, Eugène Atget: Old Paris, (Madrid: Fundación MAPFRE/TF Editores) [Δ
  
Atget, Eugène & Friedlander, Lee, 2008, Parks and Trees: Eugene Atget & Lee Friedlander, (Cologne: Galerie thomas Zander) [Δ
  
Aubenas, Sylvie, 2010, Eugène Atget, (Paris: Télérama Album) [Δ
  
Aubenas, Sylvie & Le Gall, Guillaume, 2003, Eugène Atget's Trees, (New York: D.A.P., Distributed Art Publishers) [Δ
  
Aubenas, Sylvie & Le Gall, Guillaume, 2007, Atget: Une rétrospective, (Paris: Bibliotheque Nationale de France/Editions Hazan) [Δ
  
Badger, Gerry, 2001, Eugene Atget 55, (London: Phaidon Press) [Δ
  
Baldwin, Gordon, 2000, In Focus: Eugène Atget, (Los Angeles: The J. Paul Getty Museum) [Δ
  
Borcoman, James, 1984, Eugène Atget, 1857-1927, (Ottawa: Galerie Nationale du Canada) [Δ
  
Christ, Yvan, 1951, Saint Germain des pres 1900, Vu par Atget [Δ
  
Fourquier, Alain, 2007, Atget: Un photographe déjà célebre de son vivant, (Paris: Au bibliophile parisien, Stanislas Fourquier) [Δ
  
Harris, David, 1999, Eugène Atget: Itinéraires parisiens, (Paris: Musée Carnavalet/ Paris Musées) [Δ
  
Harris, David, 2003, Eugène Atget: Unknown Paris, (New York: The New Press) [Δ
  
Krase, Andreas & Adam, Hans Christian, 2001, Eugène Atget's Paris, (Cologne: Taschen) [Δ
  
Laxton, Susan, 2002, Paris as Gameboard: Man Ray's Atgets, (New York: Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Art Gallery, Columbia University) [Δ
  
Le Gall, Guillaume, 1998, Atget, Paris pittoresque, (Paris: Editions Hazan) [Δ
  
Lemagny, Jean-Claude et al., 2000, Atget, le Pionnier, (Paris: Marval) [Δ
  
Leroy, Jean, 1975, Atget: Magicien du vieux Paris, (Joinville-le-Pont: Pierre-Jean Balbo Editeur) [Δ
  
Puttnies, Hans Georg, 1980, Atget, (Cologne: Galerie Rudolf Kicken) [Δ
  
Rauschenberg, Christopher, 2007, Paris Changing: Revisiting Eugène Atget's Paris, (New York: Princeton Architectural Press) [Δ
  
Reynaud, Françoise, 1984, Eugene Atget, (Paris: Centre National de la Photographie) [Δ
  
Szarkowski, John, 2000, Atget, (New York: the Museum of Modern Art/ Callaway) [Δ
  
Szarkowski, John & Hambourg, Maria Morris, 1981, The Work of Atget. Vol. 1: Old France, (New York: Museum of Modern Art) [Δ
  
Szarkowski, John & Hambourg, Maria Morris, 1982, The Work of Atget. Vol. II: The Art of Old Paris, (New York: Museum of Modern Art) [Δ
  
Szarkowski, John & Hambourg, Maria Morris, 1983, The Work of Atget. Vol. III: The Ancien Regime, (New York: Museum of Modern Art) [Δ
  
Szarkowski, John & Hambourg, Maria Morris, 1985, The Work of Atget. Vol. IV: Modern Times, (New York: Museum of Modern Art) [Δ
  
Wiegand, Wilfried, 1998, Eugène Atget: Paris, (New York: Te Neues Publishing Company) [Δ
  
Worswick, Clark, 2002, Berenice Abbott & Eugene Atget, (Santa Fe: Arena Editions) [Δ
  
Yokoe, Fuminori & Ogura, Kosei, 1998, Eugene Atget: A Retrospective: An Intimate View of Paris at the Turn of the Century, (Tokyo: Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography) [Δ
  
Édouard Baldus 
  
Daniel, Malcolm R., 1994, The Photographs of Édouard Baldus, (New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art; Montreal: Canadian Centre for Architecture) [Δ
  
Brassaï 
  
2003, Resonancias: Brassaï > Paris / Colom < Barcelona, (Barcelona: Fundacio Foto Colectania) [Δ
  
Aubenas, Sylvie & Bajac, Quentin, 2013, Brassaï: Paris Nocturne, (Thames & Hudson) isbn-10: 0500544255 isbn-13: 978-0500544259 [Δ
  
Brassaï, 1933, Paul Morand: Paris de Nuit, (Paris: Arts et Métiers Graphiques) [Δ
  
Brassaï, 1968, Brassaï, (New York: Museum of Modern Art) [Introduction by Lawrence Durrell] [Δ
  
Brassaï, 2001, The Secret Paris of the 1930s, (New York: Thames and Hudson) [Δ
  
Brassai, 2011, Henry Miller: The Paris Years, (Arcade Publishing) isbn-10: 1611450284 isbn-13: 978-1611450286 [Translated by Timothy Bent] [Δ
  
Warehime, Marja, 1996, Brassaï. Images of Culture and the Surrealist Observer, (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press) [Δ
  
Robert Capa 
  
Lebrun, Bernard & Lefebvre, Michel, 2012, Robert Capa: The Paris Years 1933-54, (Harry N. Abrams) isbn-10: 1419700626 isbn-13: 978-1419700620 [Δ
  
Henri Cartier-Bresson 
  
Cartier-Bresson, Henri, 1998, Henri Cartier-Bresson: Henri Cartier-Bresson: À Propos de Paris, (Bulfinch) isbn-10: 0821224964 isbn-13: 978-0821224960 [Reprint edition] [Δ
  
Joan Colom 
  
2003, Resonancias: Brassaï > Paris / Colom < Barcelona, (Barcelona: Fundacio Foto Colectania) [Δ
  
Robert Doisneau 
  
Doisneau, Robert, 1944, La semaine héroïque. 19-25 Août 1944, (Paris: S.E.P.E.) [Δ
  
Doisneau, Robert, 1955, Instantantés de Paris, (Arthaud) [Δ
  
Doisneau, Robert, 2012, Robert Doisneau: Paris Les Halles Market, (Flammarion) isbn-10: 2080201085 isbn-13: 978-2080201089 [Δ
  
Doisneau, Robert & Fouchet, Max-Pol, 1967, Le Paris de Robert Doisneau et Max-Pol Fouchet, (Paris: Éditions Messidor) [Δ
  
Louis-Emile Durandelle 
  
Baillargeon, C., 2011, ‘Construction Photography and the Rhetoric of Fundraising: The Maison Durandelle Sacre-Coeur Commission‘, Visual resources: an international journal of documentation, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 113-128 [Δ
  
Garnier, Charles, 1878, Le Nouvel Opera de Paris par Charles Garnier, (Paris: Ducher et Cie) [Illustrations are based on photographs by Louis-Emile Durandelle] [Δ
  
Nuitter, Charles, 1875, Le Nouvel Opera, (Paris: Libraire Hachette et Cie) [Illustrations are based on photographs by Louis-Emile Durandelle] [Δ
  
Robert Frank 
  
Eskildsen, Ute, 2008, Robert Frank: Paris, (Steidl) isbn-10: 3865215246 isbn-13: 978-3865215246 [Δ
  
Lee Friedlander 
  
Atget, Eugène & Friedlander, Lee, 2008, Parks and Trees: Eugene Atget & Lee Friedlander, (Cologne: Galerie thomas Zander) [Δ
  
Izis 
  
Izis, 1950, Paris des Rêves, (Lausanne: Charmes de Londres Editions La Guilde du Livre) [Δ
  
André Kertész 
  
Ducrot, Nicholas (ed.), 1972, André Kertész: Sixty Years of Photography, 1912–1972, (New York: Grossman Publishers) [Δ
  
Kertész, André, 1974, J’aime Paris: Photographs Since the Twenties, (New York: Grossman Publishers) [Δ
  
Kertész, André, 1992, André Kertész: Stranger to Paris, (Toronto: Jane Corkin Gallery) [Δ
  
Kertész, André & Mac-Orlan, Pierre, 1934, Paris Vu par André Kertész, (Paris: Editions d'Histoire et d'Art - Librairie Plon) [Δ
  
Phillips, Sandra S et al., 1985, André Kertész: Of Paris and New York, (Chicago: Art Institute of Chicago) [Δ
  
Germaine Krull 
  
Bucovich, Mario von, 1930, Paris, (New York: Random House) [Photographs by Germaine Krull] [Δ
  
Krull, Germaine, 1931, Le Confort au Palais et dans les Appartements, (Paris, Edite par SOC pour la Société Générale de Fonderie) [With texts by Pierre Mac-Orlan, Marcel Prevost and others] [Δ
  
Warnod, André, 1930, Visages de Paris, (Paris: Firmin-Didot) [Photographs by Germaine Krull] [Δ
  
Gustave Le Gray 
  
Mondenard, Anne de & Pagneux, Marc, 2012, Modernisme ou Modernité - Les photographes du cercle de Gustave Le Gray (1850-1860), (Actes Sud) isbn-13: 978-2330005429 [Δ
  
Henri Le Secq 
  
Mondenard, Anne de & Pagneux, Marc, 2012, Modernisme ou Modernité - Les photographes du cercle de Gustave Le Gray (1850-1860), (Actes Sud) isbn-13: 978-2330005429 [Δ
  
Man Ray 
  
Garcia, Erin C., 2011, Man Ray in Paris, (J. Paul Getty Museum) isbn-10: 1606060600 isbn-13: 978-1606060605 [Δ
  
Charles Marville 
  
Borhan, Pierre, 1994, Charles Marville: Vespasiennes, (Paris: Paris Musées) [Δ
  
French Institute/ Alliance Francaise, 1981, Charles Marville: Photographs of Paris at the Time of the Second Empire, (New York: French Institute/ Alliance Francaise) [Δ
  
Kennel, Sarah et. al., 2013, Charles Marville: Photographer of Paris, (University Of Chicago Press) isbn-10: 022609278X isbn-13: 978-0226092782 [Δ
  
Marville, Charles, 1997, Charles Marville, (Centre National de Photo) isbn-10: 286754100X isbn-13: 978-2867541001 [French] [Δ
  
Moncan, Pierre de, 2009, Charles Marville: Paris photographié au temps d'Haussmann, (Paris: Les Editions du Mécthne) [Δ
  
Thézy, Marie de, 1993, Charles Marville: Réverberes, (Paris: Paris Tête d'Affiche) [Δ
  
Thézy, Marie de, 1994, Marville: Paris, (Hazan) [Δ
  
Nadar 
  
Nadar, Félix, 1982, Le Paris Souterrain de Félix Nadar 1861, (Caisse nationale des monuments historiques et des sites) isbn-10: 2858220557 isbn-13: 9782858220557 [Δ
  
Charles Nègre 
  
Mondenard, Anne de & Pagneux, Marc, 2012, Modernisme ou Modernité - Les photographes du cercle de Gustave Le Gray (1850-1860), (Actes Sud) isbn-13: 978-2330005429 [Δ
  
Christopher Rauschenberg 
  
Rauschenberg, Christopher, 2007, Paris Changing: Revisiting Eugène Atget's Paris, (New York: Princeton Architectural Press) [Δ
  
Kishin Shinoyama 
  
Kishin Shinoyama, 1977, Paris, (Tokyo: Schinchosha) [Δ
  
Ed Van der Elsken 
  
Berghmans, Tamara (text), n.d.Ed van der Elsken - Looking for Love on the Left Bank, (Aman Iman Publishing) isbn-13: 978-2953391091 [Background information and contacts sheets for Ed van der Elsken’s book Love on the Left Bank.] [Δ
  
Todd Webb 
  
Davis, Keith F, & Webb, Todd, 1986, Todd Webb: Photographs of New York and Paris, (Hallmark Cards, Inc.) [Δ
  
Émile Zola 
  
Zola, Emile, 1988, Zola Photographer, (Seaver Books) isbn-10: 0805007474 isbn-13: 978-0805007473 [Δ
  
 
  
If you feel this list is missing a significant book or article please let me know - Alan - alan@luminous-lint.com 
  

HomeContentsPhotographers > Photographers worth investigating

 
Jules Aarons  (1921-) • Lucien Aigner  (1901-1999) • Eugène Atget  (1857-1927) • Édouard Boubat  (1923-1999) • Marcel Bovis • Bruno Braquehais  (1823-1875) • Brassaï  (1899-1984) • Albert Brichaut • Henri Cartier-Bresson  (1908-2004) • François Adolphe Certes • Harold Chapman  (1927-) • Choiselat & Ratel • Barnaby Conrad • François-Joseph Delintraz • Delmaet & Durandelle • André Adolphe-Eugène Disdéri  (1819-1889) • Robert Doisneau  (1912-1994) • Louis-Emile Durandelle  (check) • Hans Eijkelboom  (1949-) • William England  (1830-1896) • André Kertész  (1894-1985) • William Klein  (1928-) • Jacques-Henri Lartigue  (1894-1986) • Gabriel Loppé  (1825-1913) • Charles Marville  (1813-1879) • Willy Maywald  (1907-1985) • Achille Quinet  (check) • Christopher Rauschenberg • Willy Ronis  (1910-2009) • Charles Soulier  (check) • Philip Trager  (1935-) • Raoul Ubac  (1910-1985) • Ed Van der Elsken  (1925-1990) • Frederick von Martens  (1885-?) • Vicky Wetherill • Émile Zola  (1840-1902)
HomeGeographical regionsEuropeFrance > Paris 
 
A wider gazeRelated topics 
  
Calotypists - France 
Cityscapes - Urban 
Daguerreotypists - France 
Forest of Fontainebleau 
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Photo-Club de Paris 
 
Key dates 
  
Paris Commune (1871) 
 
  

HomeContentsOnline exhibitions > Paris

Please submit suggestions for Online Exhibitions that will enhance this theme.
Alan - alan@luminous-lint.com

 
  
ThumbnailAdolphe Braun - The Paris Commune and the Aftermath of the Franco-Prussian War (1870-1871) 
Title | Lightbox | Checklist
Released (February 20, 2007)
ThumbnailAgathe Gaillard: 35th Anniversary of the Parisian Gallery 
Title | Lightbox | Checklist
Released (June 10, 2010)
ThumbnailCharles Marville 
Title | Lightbox | Checklist
Released (December 5, 2010)
ThumbnailDocumentary: 19th Century Louis-Emile Durandelle and the Paris Opera (1860-1874) 
Title | Lightbox | Checklist
Released (October 30, 2010)
ThumbnailEugène Atget (1857-1927) 
Title | Lightbox | Checklist
Released (September 3, 2006)
ThumbnailHarold Chapman: A Retrospective 1947-2007 
Title | Lightbox | Checklist
Released (January 12, 2007)
ThumbnailImages of a Capital - The Impressionists in Paris 
Title | Lightbox | Checklist
Released (November 6, 2010) Coincides with the exhibition at the Museum Folkwang, Essen, Germany (2 October 2010 - 30 January 2011).
ThumbnailLucien Aigner: Photo/Story 
Title | Lightbox | Checklist
Released (March 19, 2011)
ThumbnailParis Commune Album (1871) 
Title | Lightbox | Checklist
Released (May 1, 2006)
ThumbnailPhotograph album - An Unknown Street Photographer in Paris (1896) 
Title | Lightbox | Checklist
Released (August 6, 2009)
ThumbnailTodd Webb 
Title | Lightbox | Checklist
Released (December 14, 2007)
  
 
  

HomeVisual indexes > Paris

Please submit suggestions for Visual Indexes to enhance this theme.
Alan - alan@luminous-lint.com

 
  
   People 
  
ThumbnailBaron Georges Haussmann 
ThumbnailGustave Eiffel 
 
  
   Photographer 
  
ThumbnailAchille Quinet: France: Paris 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailAchille Quinet: Grand Hotel, Boulevard des Capucines, Paris (1870) 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailAdolphe Braun: The Paris Commune and the Aftermath of the Franco-Prussian War 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailAdolphe Braun: Théâtre de la Guerre, 1870-1871 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailAlphonse J. Liébert: Paris Commune (1871) 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailAndré Kertész: Day of Paris 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailAndré Kertész: Newstand, Paris 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailAndré Kertész: Street photography in Paris 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailBisson freres: France: Paris: Notre Dame 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailBrassaï: Book covers: Paris de nuit 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailBrassaï: Rue Quincampoix, Paris (ca. 1932) 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailCharles Marville: Bois de Boulogne 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailCharles Marville: Ch. Marville's studio, Corner of the Boulevard Saint-Jacques, no. 66) 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailCharles Marville: Colonne Morris 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailCharles Marville: Lampposts 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailCharles Marville: Old Paris 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailCharles Marville: Pissoirs, urinoirs, vespasiennes 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailCharles Marville: The rebuilding of Paris 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailÉdouard Baldus: Notre Dame 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailErwin Blumenfeld: Lisa Fonssagrives on the Eiffel Tower (1939) 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailEugène Appert: Crimes de la Commune 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailEugène Atget: Avenue des Gobelins 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailEugène Atget: Paris: Parc Monceau 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailEugène Atget: Paris: Streets and buildings 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailGermaine Krull: Le Confort au Palais et dans les Appartements (1931) 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailGrabriel Loppé: Paris by night 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailGrabriel Loppé: Paris: Eiffel Tower 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailHarold Chapman: Paris 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailHenri Le Secq: France: Paris: Notre Dame 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailHenri Plaut: Paris 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailHenri Rivière: Photography and lithography - The Eiffel Tower 
ThumbnailHenry Fox Talbot: France: Paris 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailJoseph-Philibert Girault de Prangey: Notre Dame 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailLouis-Emile Durandelle: Construction of Sacre Coeur 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailLouis-Emile Durandelle: Construction of the Eiffel Tower 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailLouis-Emile Durandelle: Le Nouvel Opera de Paris 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailLouis-Emile Durandelle: Ornamental scuplture at the Paris Opera 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailM. Thibault: Barricades of Paris (1848) 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailNadar: Catacombs and subterranean Paris 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailPaul Maurer: Paris 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailRobert Doisneau: La Banlieue de Paris 
About this photographer | Photographs by this photographer 
ThumbnailVincent Chevalier: View of Paris 
 
  
   Connections 
  
ThumbnailÉdouard Baldus - Unidentified photographer - Bruno Braquehais - Henri Plaut 
ThumbnailJoseph-Philibert Girault de Prangey - Charles Marville - Bisson frères - Auguste Rosalie Bisson 
 
  
   Themes 
  
ThumbnailRené Patrice Proudhon Dagron: Photomicrographs and pigeon post (1870-1871) 
ThumbnailWar: Paris Commune (1871) 
 
  
   Geography 
  
ThumbnailFrance: Paris: Arc de Triomphe 
ThumbnailFrance: Paris: Bois de Boulogne 
ThumbnailFrance: Paris: Eglise de Clotilde 
ThumbnailFrance: Paris: Eiffel Tower 
ThumbnailFrance: Paris: Hôtel de Ville 
ThumbnailFrance: Paris: L'Ecole des Beaux-Arts 
ThumbnailFrance: Paris: Les Halles 
ThumbnailFrance: Paris: Montmartre 
ThumbnailFrance: Paris: Notre Dame 
ThumbnailFrance: Paris: Notre Dame: La Porte Rouge 
ThumbnailFrance: Paris: Notre Dame: The facade 
ThumbnailFrance: Paris: Pantheon 
ThumbnailFrance: Paris: Place de l'Étoile 
ThumbnailFrance: Paris: Place du Concorde 
ThumbnailFrance: Paris: Place Vendôme 
ThumbnailFrance: Paris: Pont Neuf 
ThumbnailFrance: Paris: Sacre Coeur 
ThumbnailFrance: Paris: Saint-Cloud 
ThumbnailFrance: Paris: The Louvre 
ThumbnailFrance: Paris: The Seine 
ThumbnailFrance: Paris: Tuileries 
 
 
  
   Still thinking about these... 
  
ThumbnailConstruction du Chemin de Fer Métropolitan Municipal de Paris 
ThumbnailParis et ses Environs Reproduits par le Daguerrotype, Sous la Direction de M. Ch. Philipon (Paris: Chez Aubert et Cie, 1840) 
 
  
Refreshed: 09 August 2014, 13:01
 
  
 
  
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