Luminous-Lint - for collectors and connoisseurs of fine photography
HOME  BACKFREE NEWSLETTER

Getting around

 

HomeWhat's NewContentsVisual IndexesOnline ExhibitionsPhotographersGalleries and DealersThemes
AbstractEroticaFashionLandscapeNaturePhotojournalismPhotomontagePictorialismPortraitScientificStill lifeStreetWar
CalendarsTimelinesTechniquesLibraryImages and WordsSupport 
 

Social media

Share |

 

Home > Contents > Listing - Alphabetical - Styles and movements - Articles - Wars - Organisations - Exhibitions - Magazines - Connections

 
  
Fragment > Mrs. Gladys Maud Cockburn-Lange and her faked First World War dogfight photographs 
  
Use the following to expand the context... 
  
First World War (1914-1918) 
Fabricated realities 
Fakes, forgeries, tricks and deceptions 
 
The mysterious case of Mrs. Gladys Maud Cockburn-Lange and her aerial photographs of aerial dogfights taken during the First World War are relatively well known to photo-historians.[1] In the early 1930s she supplied a number of photographs that, if authentic, would have been extraordinary - at the time they were accepted as genuine but the person who supplied them could never be contacted directly and eventually vanished from all contact. The collection was sold to the publisher Heinemann for $20,000 who published the book Death in the Air: The War Diary and Photographs of a Flying Corps Pilot.[2]
 
The photographs were reproduced in books and used in exhibitions until 1984 when there was a donation to the Smithsonian Air Museum that included personal items along with the originals of the photographs sold by Mrs. Gladys Maud Cockburn-Lange. The donation was traced to Wesley David Archer who had been a Royal Flying Corps pilot and went on to become a maker of model aeroplanes. The pieces were now coming together and within the donation there were the original photographs where the wires supporting the models still shown. Further research revealed that Mrs. Gladys Maud Cockburn-Lange was infact Mrs. Gladys Maud "Betty" Archer the wife of the person who had made the donation.[3]
Footnotes 
  
  1. Λ Joe Nickell, 2010, Camera Clues: A Handbook for Photographic Investigation , (University Press of Kentucky), p. 63 
      
  2. Λ Flying Corp Pilot, 1933, Death in the Air: The War Diary and Photographs of a Flying Corps Pilot, (W. Heinemann Limited); Reprinted - Wesley D. Archer, 1985, Death in the Air: The War Diary and Photographs of a Flying Corps Pilot, (Greenhill Press) 
      
  3. Λ Edwards Park, January 1985, The Greatest Aerial Warfare Photos Go Down in Flames, Smithsonian, pp. 102-113
     
    For the source materials - Wesley Archer (Cockburn-Lange Hoax) Collection, 1916-1960
    airandspace.si.edu/collections/artifact.cfm?object=siris_arc_226874 
      
 
  
Thumbnail Thumbnail Thumbnail  
  
Checklist 
  

  
LL/51269
ThumbnailWesley David Archer 
First World War dogfight 
1933 (or earlier) 
 
Noble Numismatics 

  
LL/51270
ThumbnailWesley David Archer 
First World War dogfight 
1933 (or earlier) 
 
Noble Numismatics 

  
LL/51271
ThumbnailWesley David Archer 
First World War dogfight 
1933 (or earlier) 
 
Noble Numismatics 
 
  
 
  
HOME  BACKFREE NEWSLETTER
 Facebook LuminousLint 
 Twitter @LuminousLint