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0822337940
 
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Lynching in the West: 1850-1935 
 
  
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Product Details 
  
 
Paperback 
299 pages 
Duke University Press 
Published 2006 
  
Review 
  
“Gonzales-Day’s work throws the emphasis on the spectators themselves and makes hard lines between then and now, them and us, difficult to draw.” --Holland Cotter, New York Times  
  
“[A] grotesque, fascinating and informative study. . . .” --Tom Clagett, Santa Fe New Mexican  
  
Book Description 
  
Accounts of lynching in the United States have primarily focused on violence against African Americans in the South. Ken Gonzales-Day reveals racially motivated lynching as a more widespread practice. His research uncovered 350 instances of lynching that occurred in the state of California between 1850 and 1935. The majority were perpetrated against Latinos, Native Americans, and Asian Americans; more Latinos were lynched in California than were persons of any other race or ethnicity.  
  
An artist and writer, Gonzales-Day began this study by photographing lynching sites in order to document the absences and empty spaces that are emblematic of the forgotten history of lynching in the West. Drawing on newspaper articles, periodicals, court records, historical photographs, and souvenir postcards, he attempted to reconstruct the circumstances surrounding the lynchings that had occurred in the spaces he was photographing. The result is an unprecedented textual and visual record of a largely unacknowledged manifestation of racial violence in the United States. Including sixteen color illustrations, Lynching in the West juxtaposes Gonzales-Day’s evocative contemporary photographs of lynching sites with dozens of historical images.  
  
Gonzales-Day examines California’s history of lynching in relation to the spectrum of extra-legal vigilantism common during the nineteenth century—from vigilante committees to lynch mobs—and in relation to race-based theories of criminality. He explores the role of visual culture as well, reflecting on lynching as spectacle and the development of lynching photography. Seeking to explain why the history of lynching in the West has been obscured until now, Gonzales-Day points to popular misconceptions of frontier justice as race-neutral and to the role of the anti-lynching movement in shaping the historical record of lynching in the United States.  
  
From the Back Cover  
  
“In this meticulously researched and innovative study, Ken Gonzales-Day brings to light the history of lynching in California. As an artist, Gonzales-Day renders a stunning visual record of an absent history. As a scholar, he assembles the documents that reveal the racial violence that undergirds the development of the Golden State, the West, and the American Dream.”—Chon A. Noriega, Professor and Director, UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center, and Adjunct Curator, Los Angeles County Museum of Art  
  
“Lynching in the West is an important and groundbreaking book, which revises the racialized history of lynching in the United States. Ken Gonzales-Day’s argument is based on extensive archival research, and his careful, nuanced reading of images provides a beautiful example of how cultural historians can use photographs as primary evidence in exciting new ways.”—Shawn Michelle Smith, author of Photography on the Color Line: W. E. B. Du Bois, Race, and Visual Culture  
  
About the Author 
  
Ken Gonzales-Day is Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Studio Art at Scripps College. A practicing artist, he has held fellowships at the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Smithsonian Institution. His work has been featured in solo and group exhibitions in cities including Los Angeles, Guadalajara, Mexico City, and New York.
 
  
 
  

This photographer...

 
  
Lynching in the West: 1850-1935 
  
Ken Gonzales-Day (Photographer)
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